Attaching Fondant (Timing)

Decorating By Franluvsfrosting Updated 22 Jul 2008 , 5:47pm by mamacc

Franluvsfrosting Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:23pm
post #1 of 9

I have a wedding cake to do in a couple of weeks and it will be buttercream with a kind of ruffle topped fondant ribbon around the base of each tier. The ribbon will actually be three very thin layers of fondant, one on top of the other for a "ruffly" effect. The ribbons will be lower on one edge than the other and the flowers will be placed at the low point on each tier.

My question is, if I make these ribbons before hand how can I store them so they will still attach to the cake? I was figuring that I would not attach them to the cake until I have it stacked and that won't happen until I'm at the site. When I'm there I won't have time to roll out ribbons on the spot!

Also, by the time the cake is ready for the ribbon the buttercream will have crusted. Do I just schmear a little bit of fresh buttercream on the back of the fondant to attach it to the cake?

Sorry, I'm new to fondant! Thanks for any help! icon_biggrin.gif

8 replies
MacsMom Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:40pm
post #2 of 9

If they need to be pliable (to wrap around a cake?), you won't be able to make them before hand as they will crack.

If they are supposed to be like bows, you can let them dry hard and attach them with roayl icing.

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:43pm
post #3 of 9

What kind of Fondant are you using?

How many tiers your cake is going to have?

Is this the first time you do a tier cake?

If you answer this questions I will be able to help you better.

Franluvsfrosting Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:55pm
post #4 of 9

I'm using Michelle Foster's fondant in white chocolate but I am willing to use something different if needed (mmf, chocolate plastic, etc)

It will be three tier and no, it's not my first. Just my first with fondant accents. I am using the SPS plate system to stack.

msauer Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:57pm
post #5 of 9

When I attach fondant to crusted buttercream, I use a paintbrush with some clear vodka and dab it where I need it to stick. It won't leave behind any flavor or taste.

I have dilemma's like this all the time...do I take it stacked or not. Last weekend I delivered a 4-tier cake already assembled because (like you) there was no way to get all the work accomplished on site. I used the center dowel support and had no problems. (Have you taken the other wedding cakes in your gallery already assembled? Is there a reason why you wouldn't do the same for this cake?)

What would you think about taking a couple of tiers already assembled with the fondant already attached? Maybe you could just add the top tier and the fondant to the top tier when you get there.

I've heard of others who have used the long cascading fondant drape and will roll it out and cover it loosely with Saran Wrap, put it in a long plastic container (maybe those under the bed storage ones would be long enough and support the fondant). I think the most important part is keeping moist otherwise you are going to get cracking on the edges.

HTH-

-Michelle

Valli_War Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 4:04pm
post #6 of 9

I am no expert. I am a newbie myself. But here are my thoughts. Can't you make the ribbon and cover it in two strips of wax paper loosely and wrap around the pan or dummy and when you stack the cakes, take the wax paper off and attach it to the cake. I am assuming it would help if you wrap around the dummy of each tier of cake so that the shape is maintained. You definitely will have to use buttercream to adhere that to the cake, that much I know. You can even use gum glue, but it takes a while for it to stick properly.

Just my thoughts.

Franluvsfrosting Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 4:13pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by msauer



What would you think about taking a couple of tiers already assembled with the fondant already attached? Maybe you could just add the top tier and the fondant to the top tier when you get there.



HTH-

-Michelle




I am attending this wedding and it's about 25 minutes away from where the reception will be. It's an outdoor reception on August 1 and the wedding is at 1pm so the reception will be at least an hour after that. The reception is at a family member's house (they have a big lovely yard with a gazebo and it's a beautiful spot for it) For obvious reasons I can't leave a wedding cake set up and unattended outside for several hours. thumbsdown.gif

I do have the use of a refrigerator on the site if the weather is too hot and it's big enough that I could place the bottom two tiers already stacked in there. Of course once it has fondant on it that changes everything!

Maybe I'll just roll out a few test ribbons and see how long it takes me. I could possibly roll them out the morning of the wedding and they'd still be moist enough to shape if I take precautions right?

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 4:31pm
post #8 of 9

OK,

My suggestion is to stack the cake at home and take it completely assemble to the venue, I make three tiers cakes all the time and always deliver assemble and I never had a problem, you are using the SPS system and I just use dowels or big straws with a dowels thru the center.

If you decide to assemble on site I would say make sure that when you pack it no air should touch it because it will crack when you try to use it.

I really think you should take it assemble and I never used the SPS system but I heard that is very good.

Good luck

Wendy

mamacc Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:47pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by wendy1273

OK,

My suggestion is to stack the cake at home and take it completely assemble to the venue, I make three tiers cakes all the time and always deliver assemble and I never had a problem, you are using the SPS system and I just use dowels or big straws with a dowels thru the center.

If you decide to assemble on site I would say make sure that when you pack it no air should touch it because it will crack when you try to use it.

I really think you should take it assemble and I never used the SPS system but I heard that is very good.

Good luck

Wendy




This is what I do too. The center dowel makes a big difference!

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