Heating Core & Flower Nails - Please Explain

Decorating By sweet_2th_fairy Updated 22 Jul 2008 , 6:23pm by wendy1273

sweet_2th_fairy Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 2:49pm
post #1 of 16

I just read another post discussing baking a pound cake and using a heating core or flower nail to help with the baking. I understand the concept, but is a heating core something that you purchase or make? How do you do the "flower nail method?" Sorry, I'm new at this... icon_redface.gif

15 replies
kettlevalleygirl Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:01pm
post #2 of 16

Wilton sells a heating core, which is sort of a metal cup placed in the middle of the cake while cooking. I have it and have used it, but use flower nails more. (I am not a professional!)
I use the nail, by placing the nail on the greased pan, I grease the nail also, I use several nails, depending on the size. place them around the pan, then pour the batter in the pan, slide them back to the place I want them and then throw them in the oven. (the nails are pointy up).
Then after they cool for 10 minutes, I turn the cake upside down on a rack, and the nails come out easily.
It really does work for even cooking.

mamajan61 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:13pm
post #3 of 16

I don't even own a heating core. I've had so much luck with the nails... I figured why mess with something that works... icon_smile.gif

ladybuglau Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:15pm
post #4 of 16

I read somewhere that the reason cakes dome in the middle is because most of the heat is conducted in from the sides and bottom of the pan. When the heat travels to the middle, it has nowhere else to go and pushes the cake up and forms a dome. When you use a heating core, or a flower nail (which I use) it conducts the heat to the middle and the cake cooks up much more evenly, without overbrown edges while the middle is still uncooked. It works even better if you use the bake even strips on the outside of the pan. No more domes to slice off!
p.s. you don't need to use a heating core unless you're baking a large cake, I personally don't use them unless it's 10/12" or larger

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:37pm
post #5 of 16

Hello,
I have tried every method out there and I can tell you that the best tip I got is from from Jennifer Dontz.

Don't waist you time and cakes and take a old shower towel and cut it in to strips long enough to wrap around the pan wet and secure with a pin, It works like a charm, your cakes will be level every time and I make a lot of 14" and 15" cakes and I never use a hearing core or a nail and they always cook nice and even.

Good luck
Wendy

tonedna Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 3:55pm
post #6 of 16

The towel idea is the same idea as the baking strips from Wilton. The whole thing depends to on the oven. I need a baking core for cakes over 10. For some reason the centers dont want to cook in my house. But at the shop, with the professional oven, never the need for anything, they cook perfect everytime.
Edna

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:22pm
post #7 of 16

Tonedna,

You are right the towel idea is the same as the strip but a list you can save a few dollars.

thumbs_up.gif

I have a electric oven and it works great for me and I had a lot of problems before with my cakes not cooking even and now my problem is solve. icon_lol.gif

Tonedna,
I love your cakes! You are very talented

Aliwis000 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:32pm
post #8 of 16

I am no professional lol!!!! But I use a flower nail when I make a 9*13. I have the bakeing strips but cant use them on my 9*13 because the sides slope down (not sure if I am saying that right) so the strips dont stay up. The nail works very well and I dont have to level it.


Not to hijack the thread but do you all bake on "bake" or "convect"? Just wondering

tonedna Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:43pm
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by wendy1273

Tonedna,

You are right the towel idea is the same as the strip but a list you can save a few dollars.

thumbs_up.gif

I have a electric oven and it works great for me and I had a lot of problems before with my cakes not cooking even and now my problem is solve. icon_lol.gif

Tonedna,
I love your cakes! You are very talented




Oh thanks for saying that! icon_biggrin.gif

I just mention the strips so people know that basically is the same thing..icon_biggrin.gif

the cake whole Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:47pm
post #10 of 16

I have just finished 3 12" x 18" slabs and did not want to take any chances, too much time and money worth of ingredients! So I bought the heating core. I found it works great! The cakes are level and the sides are not overdone at all. When I removed the core I could see how perfectly moist the centre of the cake is, which gives me a little reassurance that it baked evenly. The only issue I have with the heating core is I have a difficult time getting all the cake out of it, no matter how much I grease it up! The up side is I get a little taste of the hard work, yummy!!
Good luck!
thumbs_up.gif

sweet_2th_fairy Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:57pm
post #11 of 16

Thanks for all the explanations and alternative methods. For those that use the flower nails, how many do you use for a 10" cake? Do you just position them centered in the middle or do you place them sporadically around the cake?

For the homemade towel method, what type of towel do you use? Is it really thick like a bath towel or is it thinner like one you would wipe dishes with?

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:00pm
post #12 of 16

I don't use a hearing core when I use my towels strips and I have baked 12x18" and it worked perfect for me. But I don't get to eat that extra from the heating core so if it works for you go ahead!!
thumbs_up.gif

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:00pm
post #13 of 16

I don't use a heating core when I use my towels strips and I have baked 12x18" and it worked perfect for me. But I don't get to eat that extra from the heating core so if it works for you go ahead!!
thumbs_up.gif

jlsheik Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:10pm
post #14 of 16

I am not an expert but this is my opinion.....wet fabric or strips from wilton act as an insulator and keep the cake from getting so done on the outside befor the inside, so it does not have the hard outer crust....and by more even baking cuts down the need for the heat core. You really should not need a heat core unless you are baking a 3in high pan. Even the larger 2 inch pans will bake out just fine if you lower the temp just a little, wrap and cook a little longer.
Also, just my opinion....but a tomato paste can works perfect cut out on both ends and washed and any trace of label removed and greased very well after baking you can pull right out and not have to plug the hole. I have used all three methods they all work though.

Maria_Campos Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:19pm
post #15 of 16

I use both the stripes and nails, I'm just paranoid like that. I don't like the core, it's just one more thing to do, and I like to keep it as simple as possible when it comes to the baking part.

wendy1273 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:23pm
post #16 of 16

Jlsheik, you hit the nail in the head, your right!!

I just have to add that I have a electric oven and I set the temp at 335 instead of 350.

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