Acetate Sheets

Decorating By sweettoothmom Updated 30 Jul 2008 , 4:40pm by sweettoothmom

sweettoothmom Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 10:06pm
post #1 of 16

Hello I am looking for acetate sheets for transfering of royal icing etc to a cake.

Also has anyone looked at Global Sugar Art lately? I was just there today looking for acetate sheets. Oh my goodness they have the prettiest laser cut cupcake papers I think I have ever seen!

They would make a cc bouquet look so adorable! Check it out!!!!

Thank you in advance for helping me find these products.

15 replies
snowshoe1 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 1:23pm
post #2 of 16

You can get the acetate sheets here:

http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/SearchResults.aspx

Yep - saw those cupcake wrappers. Really pretty!

Bossy Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 1:27pm
post #3 of 16

Bought some of the laser cut cupcake papers at the ICES Orlando show. There are so many to choose from, they all look great so had to just choose a couple!!!

sweettoothmom Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 5:41pm
post #4 of 16

Thank you snowshoe and Bossy! Enjoy those cc papers!

ladycake17 Posted 22 Jul 2008 , 6:39pm
post #5 of 16

How do you use acetate sheets to transfer RI? I'm sure everyone is saying WHAT? I don't think I know how it is done. Thanks!

sweettoothmom Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 9:59pm
post #6 of 16

I have not attempted it since I couldnt find the acetate but to my understanding you apply the icing in the given decoration or pattern and then once it is dry you use an artists spatula to remove it and apply. THis could alo be used to create the tiaras and other RI decorations. But once again this will be my first attempt and I am a little bit more than scared!

adobewife Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 10:14pm
post #7 of 16

I love acetate for RI, but if it is a small design, I just use parchment. I just tape it over the design, and pipe. The great thing about parchment, is that when the design is dry, it releases. If the design is bigger than lettering, or small detail, DO NOT USE! The parchment warps with to much moisture. I did the little lettering for my "Chloe" cake in my gallery this way, and the lettering was tiny, and I just set it on with a palette knife.

Aliwis000 Posted 23 Jul 2008 , 10:20pm
post #8 of 16

acetate? Easy to find. Go to a print shop or copy place that does binding. We use the 8.5*11 sheets to cover bound books. They will probably sell you a few sheets at a time, we do. They come to us in 100 sheet packs but maybe Office Max sells them in small quantities. Hope this helps!

Alicia

sweettoothmom Posted 25 Jul 2008 , 2:15am
post #9 of 16

Is there a difference in the end result between using wax paper verses parchment paper?

Thanks for hte input on the acetate sheets from a printer. We dont have anyone in our little kneck of the woods who is a printer. But I will look at office supply stores for them. GOOD IDEA!

adobewife Posted 25 Jul 2008 , 2:35am
post #10 of 16

Parchment releases better, but is prone to warping with a large piece, I am always nervous with wax paper, even if I grease it lightly. If the piece is large, I sometimes, cut around the design with an exacto knife, and tell the client that I left the paper on the back, so that it is easier to remove for cutting ; ), and so they don't eat it. They seem to appreciate that I take that into consideration.

sweettoothmom Posted 25 Jul 2008 , 5:25pm
post #11 of 16

I am experienceing warping with wax paper and that is why I was looking into the acetate.

I have not used parchment paper before.

adobewife Posted 26 Jul 2008 , 5:30am
post #12 of 16

I also know a local lady, who does a lot of RI, and she uses plastic wrap (NOT CLING), and she does beautiful work. I've never tried this, but I liked the fact that she can use the same pattern board over and over this way.

sweettoothmom Posted 28 Jul 2008 , 7:20am
post #13 of 16

The only issues I have with plastic wrap is that it is too flexible and it leads to cracking during application.

adobewife Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:39am
post #14 of 16

She stretches her very tautly over a stiff board so that it is almost laminated. Then she removes dried pieces with a palette knife.

snowshoe1 Posted 29 Jul 2008 , 1:07pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by adobewife

I also know a local lady, who does a lot of RI, and she uses plastic wrap (NOT CLING), and she does beautiful work. I've never tried this, but I liked the fact that she can use the same pattern board over and over this way.




OK - silly question of the day icon_redface.gif - what is the difference between plastic wrap and cling? TIA

sweettoothmom Posted 30 Jul 2008 , 4:40pm
post #16 of 16

You know I do not know the difference while doing my shopping this week I looked to see if the labels read differently or showed some difference.
And you know I couldnt find anything. So I am not sure there is a difference. Can anyone help us on this one?

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