More Sheet Cake Questions- Urgent For Customer

Decorating By Beanie1001 Updated 21 Jul 2008 , 8:23pm by kimmypooh79

Beanie1001 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 5:36pm
post #1 of 11

I know some people make sheet cakes and just ice them with no filling. When they do fill them and layer them, is it usually just one layer that they bake and then layer and fill them? Or do they bake two separate layers? I'd like to sell mine with some height.

Also, how do you usually price sheet cakes? I live in Philadelphia. For normal occasion cakes I charge 2ps for all buttercream. But I know people usually charge less for sheet cakes. PLEASE HELP! I need to get back to a customer who wants a sheet cake

10 replies
shannycakes321 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 5:44pm
post #2 of 11

I usually bake two separate sheet cakes, then torte them both and stack them. Not sure about pricing though, I guess that would depend on what else you were doing for decoration. Hope this helps!

kimmypooh79 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 5:54pm
post #3 of 11

I am too chicken to torte so I bake 2 layers and fill in between those. I made an all buttercream 9x13 and sold it for $40, but I only made about $15 dollars on it. It was my first for profit cake, it's in my photos the polka dot one, I probably sold it too cheap. I don't really know.

robinscakes Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:03pm
post #4 of 11

Most of what I do is sheet cakes. I always fill them. I bake two separate layers, spread the filling on one while they're still in the pan, sandwich them together, take one pan off and replace it with the cake board, then flip it onto the cake board and take the other pan off (make sense?). My prices start at $25 for a 1/4, $35 for a 1/2, $45 for a 3/4, and $55 for a full. Those are the base prices and the price goes up with the complexity of the design and if they don't use one of my basic flavors. I live in a small town, so I can't get the prices that most people can.

akgirl10 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:13pm
post #5 of 11

I don't see why you wouldn't charge your base price of 2ps for your sheet cake, it's still the same recipe you use on round or square cakes. I like torted and filled cakes. Torte or bake two layers, whatever works best for you. If you do two 2" layers, be sure to charge for all that cake!

There are plenty of people who do not charge less for sheet cakes.

indydebi Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:17pm
post #6 of 11

Robin, what are you calling a 1/2 and a full sheet?

If I bothered to use the terms, I would call a full sheet a 18x24 (two 12x18's). So if you double layer an 18x24 (four 12x18's), that's enough cake for 200 people ... and you're only charging $55???? That's less than 30 cents a serving.

I would call a half sheet a 12x18. So if you're baking two of these and double-layering them, that's cake for 100 for $35????

Please tell me I'm missing something here! icon_eek.gif I can't believe anywhere in the country that 30 cents a serving is considered "standard" price!

robinscakes Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:23pm
post #7 of 11


I don't have the dimentions off hand, but my 1/4 serves 24, my 1/2 serves 48, my 3/4 serves 74 and my full serves 98. Yes, that's a little over .50 a serving for basic cake. With the design it's more. But, I live in economically strapped Michigan and I get what I can get. I still make a profit.

indydebi Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:33pm
post #8 of 11

Still looking for some dimensions..... On a double layer cake, are you considering a serving the standard 1x2x4 .... or are you cutting them 2x2x4? How many cake mixes would you use for the pan?

I can make a 12x18 cake and say it serves 3, but it depends on how big I cut the pieces. icon_biggrin.gif

By the way, the whole country is "economically strapped". Haven't heard one governor wave his hand and say, "Hey! Everything's great in MY state!" icon_biggrin.gif

Indiana is ALSO very dependent on the auto making industry .... a lot of the Tier 1 and Tier 2 ... and even Tier 3 suppliers are in Indiana. (I worked two different jobs that supported the Big Three auto industry.) So when GM is down ... so is Indiana.

robinscakes Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:42pm
post #9 of 11

I don't charge by the tiny little wedding cake servings. I charge for a realistic piece of cake icon_biggrin.gif

So, yes, if you cut my cake you'd get a lot more pieces of it. They're the same dimentions as the grocery stores sell. I generally don't charge by the slice, but by the cake. My prices are a little higher than the grocery stores, and and about double Sam's Club.

Michigan has the highest percentage of people moving out of state and the highest rate of foreclosures. It's bad. I know it's bad everywhere. I moved from Indiana to Michigan. It was bad where I lived, too (Shelby County, SE of Indy). Believe me, people still complain that my prices are high. As long as I'm making a profit and my customers are happy with the product I'm happy.

Suzycakes Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:46pm
post #10 of 11

My sheet cake sizes are the same as Debi's. I never 'double layer' them unless the area where the cake is going to be served is strapped for space ( unless the order is for a double sheetcake to fee 200 people or so).

If a customer requests a filling I split my 2" tall frozen sheetcake in half horizantally and slide the top off, spread with filling and gently slide the top back on. Then let the cake finish thawing before I try to ice. I cannot ice a frozen cake - but that is another thread.

kimmypooh79 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 8:23pm
post #11 of 11

Alright ladies, let's not start the my state is poorer than your state discussion.

Robin--I'm with you on this one and I just want my customers happy, I cut larger pieces on sheet cakes. I charge per cake instead of per serving at least for now while I'm still new at it.

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