How Do You Handle This?

Decorating By joy5678 Updated 21 Jul 2008 , 1:07am by joy5678

joy5678 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 4:46am
post #1 of 23

I spoke with a bride to be in regard to her wedding cake. The first question I had was how many people was she inviting to the wedding. Her answer was that she only wanted a small cake because her family was going to make sheet cakes to serve in addition to the wedding cake. How would you handle this situation? I haven't faced this before but I'm not quite comfortable with it. I want to do her cake but I don't feel that I can tell her not to bring in other additional cakes (probably a money problem). What do you do? Thanks for your suggestions.

22 replies
MacsMom Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 5:25am
post #2 of 23

I'm still honored when someone wants me to do their cake and I have to be understanding if they need to cut costs. I just cross my fingers that my cake tastes better than the other!

I know there is also the possibility of mistaken identity in case the sheet cakes are awful and guests think you made them, but heck, I can't afford my own cakes so I like to help others' out.

I'm making a wedding cake next month for a bride who is expecting 120 guests but can only afford a cake that serves 90, so her mother and grandmother and bringing platters of Italian wedding cookies! (I'm going to make the cake larger for her).

cakequeen50 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 5:38am
post #3 of 23

I know you will probably get all kinds of comments on how you don't want your name associated with other's cakes but I look at it like Macsmom, I try to help people out. I am a firm believer in Karma and doing unto others as you would have them do unto you, NOT before they do unto you. Kindess goes a long way.....that is until you come across a real PITA, then the rules change!

yummymummycakes Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:04am
post #4 of 23

Whilst I agree with the above opinions, I also like to help people out when applicable, what happens if someone gets sick and they claim it was your cake?

I have read a lot of posts on CC where it seems to be a real problem in the USA, seems like you can sue for almost anything.

Just a thought.....

leah_s Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 7:38am
post #5 of 23

I will not take a cake to a wedding, especially, where other cakes are present. (OK on the cookies.) It's posted on my webiste, and brides have to initial that clause in my contract and sign the contract also.

Frankly, her budget just isn't my problem. If she wants my cake she'll buy it. And cut her budget somewhere else.

I'm all in favor of being nice, but not when it may damage my reputation. As food suppliers our reputations are mostly what we have. (Some skills, of course . . .)

kakeladi Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 11:07am
post #6 of 23

Totally agree w/leahs!

indydebi Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:38pm
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

Totally agree w/leahs!




Absolutely! I HAVE told a bride, "Oh, other cakes? Sorry, I can't do it then." I've given her my "reputation protection and liability issues" speech and she understood my position.

I'm not here to start the debate between home and shop cakers, but I think those who have shop rent to pay tend to be more adament about this very real liability issue and the high value of the reputation of their business. I'm not paying $1500 a month in rent to help people out ... I'm doing it to make a profit and with the hopes that the business will grow.

I DO help people out ... once a year, we select a bride and groom and do their wedding cake for free, as a surprise to them (usually a military couple). I did a $500+ reception for free for a young man who was shipping out to Iraq in just 2 weeks.

Look, this is not just personal opinion. This is court law. I recall a story shared on CC some time ago. An unlicensed, home-caterer did a wedding and the family brought "the family potato salad". The potato salad sat out all night. The cleaning crew saw it and ate some. The cleaning crew took the leftover home to their family, who ate some. Cleaning crew, cleaning crew's family, and some of the guests ended up with food poisoning. Even tho' the caterer had NOTHING TO DO WITH THE SALAD, she was sued. The court found her liable because since she was the caterer, she was therefore considered the food expert and should have made sure the potato salad was properly disposed of. She lost her business AND her home.

This is very real, people, and you're either in business ... or you're trying to be everyone's friend. But either way, you better CYA!!

chutzpah Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 5:08pm
post #8 of 23

It has nothing to do with karma. Not one bit. Not one itty, bitty tiny little bit. Nope. No way. Nothing.

I have a LOT of overhead. I pay rent, garbage collection, payroll, electric bill (2 freezers, 4 fridges, commercial dishwasher, biggass espresso machine and coffee mill, bigass Hobart, bigass oven, lights etc), city planning office fees (sidewalk sign), insurance, telephone (cell & regular), HD fees, contract with the exterminator (required by HD... I think they are cahootsing), (and reparation of machines if something happens). Blah blah blah.

I am a business women. Karma points have to be raked in elsewhere (donations to charity, cat shelter, basic good deeds towards my fellow man, etc). I do plenty of mitzvot during the course of a week. I'm not worried about karma coming around and biting me in the ass, because I KNOW that won't happen.

It's the difference between running with the big dogs and playing on the swings.... Debi knows what I mean! icon_smile.gif

joy5678 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:09pm
post #9 of 23

Thank you all for your input on this subject. My thinking was leaning in the direction that Indy, Leahs & chutzpah discussed, but I wasn't sure why. I do not want to be held liable for anyone elses "stuff". So I won't even put myself in the position for that to happen. I've been around long enough to listen to good advice especially when it can go into a "legal" matter. I like to help others out also, but not at the high cost that it may wind up costing me. I'll find other outlets for that. One more thing---if you don't mind sharing-can you tell me how your contract is worded regarding this issue. I don't have it in mine, but want to add it. You can pm me it you wish. Thanks again

cakequeen50 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:18pm
post #10 of 23

I guess that is my problem, chutzpah, I've been playing on the swings too long. I may need to get up off my bigass and go run with the big dogs soon!

chutzpah Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:22pm
post #11 of 23

icon_rolleyes.gif

bobbie2003 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:40pm
post #12 of 23

I was wondering if you could decorate a dummy cake for her and then they could just eat the sheet cakes. Just a thought.

chutzpah Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 6:46pm
post #13 of 23

The thing about that is everyone sees this gorgeous cake and then eats a 1-inch tall square slice of Aunt Jan's sheet cake and it's dry and gross with no filling..... everyone will think it's Joy's cake. It's her reputation on the line.

southerncake Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 7:01pm
post #14 of 23

I agree with Leahs and Debi -- no cake made by anyone other than me!! Unlike a lot of other bakers, my wedding sheet cakes are not the same $$ per serving as my tiered cakes (if they are just flat iced on a plain piece of board with a basic border around the bottom -- they are not meant to be seen). If they can't afford for me to do a tiered cake for their number of servings, then I actually do feel like I am offering them an economical alternative with the sheet cakes.

I just don't feel it's worth the risk!

indydebi Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 8:12pm
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by joy5678

One more thing---if you don't mind sharing-can you tell me how your contract is worded regarding this issue. I don't have it in mine, but want to add it. You can pm me it you wish. Thanks again




Here's mine:

10. No other perishable foods can be brought in from another source, professional or private, when Cater It Simple is providing the buffet.. If the wedding cake is purchased from Cater It Simple, no other sheet or kitchen cakes can be brought in from another source. This is to insure reputation and liability issues.

leah_s Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 9:53pm
post #16 of 23

Sole provider: Customer agrees that Gallery House will be the sole provider of all cake servings at this function, and failure to comply with this policy will result in forfeiture of both the cake(s) and the full purchase price of the cake(s) as paid by the customer, excluding deposits on rented or loaned material. Cake is defined as, but not limited to, any sheet cake, Groom's cake, or faux/fake cake furnished, purchased, rented, or gifted by any third party. Dessert buffets and displays of individual pastries are excluded.

southerncake Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 10:41pm
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Sole provider: Customer agrees that Gallery House will be the sole provider of all cake servings at this function, and failure to comply with this policy will result in forfeiture of both the cake(s) and the full purchase price of the cake(s) as paid by the customer, excluding deposits on rented or loaned material. Cake is defined as, but not limited to, any sheet cake, Groom's cake, or faux/fake cake furnished, purchased, rented, or gifted by any third party. Dessert buffets and displays of individual pastries are excluded.




I like this wording. I am going to change my paragraph on this subject to something more like Leahs. Thanks for sharing!!

maryak Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 12:00am
post #18 of 23

I agree, it's got nothing to do with Karma. I made cupcakes for my cousin as a gift because she loves them so much, but she ended up getting another cake to sit on top without telling me icon_mad.gif . The other cake was so dry and disgusting that I noticed no one was eating my cupcakes. It absolutely infuriated me but I couldn't go around telling everyone at the party, I didn't make the top cake only the cupcakes, they were too drunk to take me seriously!! Urgh, I don't want to be associated with horrible dry cakes, so I say don't do it. If they can make sheet cakes then they can order a small cake from the store if it's a budget issue.

maryak Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 12:02am
post #19 of 23

Sorry I know my post sounds too harsh, but the wounds are still fresh, this only happened two weeks ago. icon_redface.gif

FromScratch Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 12:18am
post #20 of 23

I have a sole provider clause in my contract too and I am a (legal) home baker. I take things very seriously and I don't want my cakes to be associated with anything but my cakes. Plated desserts are different. If they want to have a pastry table fine by me, but no other cakes.

bobwonderbuns Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 12:36am
post #21 of 23

I'm glad this came up because I have that clause in my contract as well and make sure the client understands this, but I'm wondering how to police this policy? I'm not invited to these weddings, I just set up the cake and go. I've had suspicions on some of the clients but nothing ever came of it.

Marcelita Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 12:53am
post #22 of 23

Thank you so much Leahs, Indydebi and Chutzpah...I have learned SO much from reading your posts on this topic thumbs_up.gif

joy5678 Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 1:07am
post #23 of 23

Thank you all soooo much for your help. I'm going to add the sole provider clause to my contract tomorrow. How in the world did I get along without you all before CC came into my world??????

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