Does Anyone Not Offer American Buttercream?

Business By mom42ws Updated 28 Sep 2008 , 1:27am by lilthorner

mom42ws Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 6:52pm
post #1 of 107

just wondering if there are people out there who do not offer traditional/american buttercream. i really dislike working with it and even more cleaning it up and cleaning it out of all my tools/equipment. i recently have found IMBC (finally) and am considering only offering the IMBC to my customers...no regular buttercream. i think it's more sophisticated and lighter but without sacrificing flavor. what are your thoughts on this?

thanks for your insight!
ashley

106 replies
chutzpah Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:03pm
post #2 of 107

D'ya mean the kind made with crisco/powdered sugar?

if so, the answer is NO NO NO!

I think it is way gross, won't eat it, and wouldn't think of serving it to a guest or a customer.

Powdered sugar frostings are gritty. Crisco leaves a film in your mouth 'cause the melting point is so much higher than butter.

SMBC for me, because on the rare occasions that I eat frosting I want it to be GOOD..

*President and founder of the Cake Snob Club*

FromScratch Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:04pm
post #3 of 107

Me!! I don't use american buttercream at all unless someone *really* wants it (usually for a child's party) or doesn't care for SMBC (though I have yet to meet a person who didn't like it). I make SMBC and that's all I use. Even for cream cheese frosting.. just whip up some room temp cc and fold the SMBC/IMBC into that.. it's REALLY good and much more stable than powdered sugar based cc icing can be.

**edited to add that I've been a proud member of TCSC since 2007 (unofficially since much before, but it was official in 2007) icon_lol.gificon_wink.gif

chutzpah Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:05pm
post #4 of 107

as usual, my favorite seester...... great minds think alike.....

FromScratch Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:07pm
post #5 of 107

icon_biggrin.gif

snarkybaker Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 107

Would never even dream of making a cake with powdered sugar frosting...not delicious and too hard to work with.

tootie0809 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:21pm
post #7 of 107

I would love to only do SMBC, but I just can't get mine stable enough. It melts even in my air conditioned kitchen. I tried icing a large 2-tiered cake a couple weeks ago with it and attaching some small gumpaste flowers to the sides, and they started to slip off after just about 30 minutes out of the fridge. I hate the taste of powdered sugar and shortening icings, but I do use it because it is much easier to get use and I can attach lots of decorations to it.

For those of you who only use SM or IMBC, how do you keep it stable and from melting? What am I doing wrong? I really, really want to use this type of icing only, but I'm ready to give up on it.

FromScratch Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:25pm
post #8 of 107

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.

golfgirl1227 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:29pm
post #9 of 107

I don't offer it. Sometimes I will do a mix of IMBC and an all-butter powdered sugar icing, when it's for kids (but that's only on cupcakes, and only if I need to).

loriemoms Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:38pm
post #10 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.




Same here! Its too humid here for use it for wedding cakes and I don't have walk in fridge to keep the cakes in! (I have a dedicated fridge, which will hold two cakes tiered cakes, tops!)

I would love to see a stablized recipe!

luvscakes Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:47pm
post #11 of 107

I also am one of those snobs- I went with IMBC a couple of years ago and would never put that other on my cakes- it's my reputation on the line and I want to offer something truly professional and unique. If they wanted the other BC I figured they can buy a much cheaper cake at Walmart or the other grocery stores!

indydebi Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 7:48pm
post #12 of 107

what's "American Buttercream"? icon_confused.gif

FromScratch Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:21pm
post #13 of 107

American style buttercream is shortening/butter based with powdered sugar as opposed to the european style buttercreams which are egg based with granulated sugar and butter.

You can sub 1/2 (or I know that leahs uses all) high ratio shortening for the butter in SMBC/IMBC to give it some more stability. I just don't care for the sickly sweetness and gritty mouth feel that powdered sugar gives to a frosting.

PinkZiab Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:31pm
post #14 of 107

I only do American Buttercream as a special request (and the REALLY have to beg, and have to have tasted my other buttercreams first lol). I usually do swiss or italian, and occasionally a french or german (mousseline), but those last two are also only for certain desserts/cakes, and not usually with wedding/occasion cakes. My American Buttercream is most butter with a small amount of sweetex (for a large batch I use 5 lbs of butter to only about 600 grams of sweetex)

southerncake Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:32pm
post #15 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.



Same here! Its too humid here for use it for wedding cakes and I don't have walk in fridge to keep the cakes in! (I have a dedicated fridge, which will hold two cakes tiered cakes, tops!)

I would love to see a stablized recipe!




Lorie, I have the same problem (maybe it's because we are only 30 minutes away from one another with the same humidity problem)!

I would love to try a really, really great recipe that some of the PPs can recommend!

tootie0809 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:35pm
post #16 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.




Well, I've tried a few different recipes. The most recent one I tried was:

1-1/2 cups egg whites
3 cups sugar
3 pounds unsalted butter
1 tbsp flavoring

I've tried switching some of the butter to high-ratio shortening, and that has not helped. I've also tried adding a couple tbsp of meringue powder and that has also not helped. I haven't tried IMBC yet. The whole sugar syrup freaks me out. Is IMBC more stable than SMBC?

yelle66 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:38pm
post #17 of 107

I don't offer it. If someone really wanted that kind, I suppose I would, but otherwise, I just love SMBC too much (although, I must say, sugarshack's icing is very pretty)!

Chef_Stef Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:42pm
post #18 of 107

I lean HARD towards IMBC. I offer ABC (american bc) but ONLY against my will and ONLY if it's an outdoor cake where there are heat issues, or if the bride has said they don't like the IMBC, and yes I've had some that don't. They say it's not sweet enough, too buttery, and one actually called it 'waxy'. I told her she's not supposed to eat it COLD, but she went with Bettercreme, so go figure (I hate that stuff, too; swear it's not food).

SO--Yes, I offer it, but not willingly. My samples always come with IMBC.

I don't like making it, cleaning up after it, eating it, working with it, and it almost without fail will cause blowouts in heat after being in the fridge, which I never get with my IMBC. icon_razz.gif

Every time I work with it, I like it less, actually.

Jenn2179 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:44pm
post #19 of 107

I only use an American buttercream. I use the recipe from the Whimsical Bake House for thier House buttercream and everyone loves it. Not sickly sweet and not critty at all.

Homemade-Goodies Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:49pm
post #20 of 107

I have been making an odyssey in search of the best buttercream for me. While travelling thru the 'American' versions, (indydebi's is the best of them all, btw!!!!) I found mostly only children were liking it. The Dutch palette is used to whipped cream cakes mostly, so the sweetness of the powdered sugar wasn't appealing to adults at all.

I kept searching and have landed on either the Dutch buttercream (which I'm working on the recipe in English to post here) or Martha Stewart's SMBC. The Dutch one tastes like melty soft ice cream....yummers! Even my Dutch husband sneaks his pinky 'accidentally' in the bowl from time to time. And he ain't a sweets man, so that's a compliment!! thumbs_up.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:52pm
post #21 of 107

I wish I could offer something else, but under the Ohio Cottage Laws, I can't sell anything that needs to be refrigerated. Darn!

loriemoms Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:54pm
post #22 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncake

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.



Same here! Its too humid here for use it for wedding cakes and I don't have walk in fridge to keep the cakes in! (I have a dedicated fridge, which will hold two cakes tiered cakes, tops!)

I would love to see a stablized recipe!



Lorie, I have the same problem (maybe it's because we are only 30 minutes away from one another with the same humidity problem)!

I would love to try a really, really great recipe that some of the PPs can recommend!




I am glad to see I am not alone! I don't know anyone in our area that isnt doing some sort of variation of buttercream....I just don't think the eggwhite/sugar based frostings like humidity!!

KoryAK Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:56pm
post #23 of 107

I'm in the only-ABC-if-you-beg club

FromScratch Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 8:57pm
post #24 of 107

I don't have to deal with the high heat all the time, but I have had SMBC out in the high 80's with no issues of having it melt off of a cake and it definitely shouldn't be melting off the cake at 68-72 degrees (what I assume your ac'd house it kept at). I wouldn't do a BC cake for an outdoor event in the summer, so I don't run into this so much. I know it's hard for you to avoid that living in the bowels of hell (temp wise only icon_wink.gif no ill will meant at all) Have you tried making it will all high ratio shortening? When you mix it up, is it stiff and stable and then falls apart when you have your cake outside?

You can try my recipe if you want..

10 egg whites
2 cups sugar
6 sticks unsalted butter (or 3 cups high ratio shortening or a combo of the two)
3 TBSP vanilla

Here's a post where I posted pics of the mixing process:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-594605-.html

snarkybaker Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:28pm
post #25 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncake

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

What's your recipe? Maybe we can help you.



Same here! Its too humid here for use it for wedding cakes and I don't have walk in fridge to keep the cakes in! (I have a dedicated fridge, which will hold two cakes tiered cakes, tops!)

I would love to see a stablized recipe!



Lorie, I have the same problem (maybe it's because we are only 30 minutes away from one another with the same humidity problem)!

I would love to try a really, really great recipe that some of the PPs can recommend!



I am glad to see I am not alone! I don't know anyone in our area that isnt doing some sort of variation of buttercream....I just don't think the eggwhite/sugar based frostings like humidity!!




Sorry to break this to you all, but I am right over in Chapel Hill and we do all European buttercreams. Mostly IMBC, but for outdoor weddings, the german kind with the poured fondant in it holds very well.

Mike1394 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:28pm
post #26 of 107

I try to keep it IMBC yummy stuff icon_biggrin.gif . The issue I'm having is I have an out side event in two weeks, and they want a cake icon_mad.gif. So it's either some form of P Sugar, and crisco, or bettercream. One's a handful of preservatives, and the other is full grease. Oh the travesty of it all LOLOL

Mike

Amy729 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:33pm
post #27 of 107

o.k., I guess I am kinda slow because I had no idea you could make SMBC with hi ratio!

The only reason I wasn't too crazy about it before was because I thought it was a little too buttery. (I know, too buttery! crazy icon_smile.gif )

Jeanne, have you made it with the high ratio and if so what are the differences.

Thanks!

Amy

Amy729 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:35pm
post #28 of 107

txkat,

what is the german kind? I have never heard of that before.

snarkybaker Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:48pm
post #29 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amy729

txkat,

what is the german kind? I have never heard of that before.




Basically you make a poured fondant ( or buy it) or alternately you can make an inverted sugar syrup which is stable at room temperature and beat it into equal parts butter.

There are some people who call a pastry cream based buttercream "german buttercream" It uses pastry cream, with butter and a very small amount of powdered sugar. It is very stable as well.

snarkybaker Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 9:52pm
post #30 of 107

Oh and by the way...American Buttercream is actually a whole egg buttercream:
http://www.cookingforengineers.com/recipe/180/Buttercream-Frosting-American

The concoction made from confectioners sugar, some form of solid fat, and some form of liquid is called "powdered sugar frosting"

Sorry...pet peeve. icon_twisted.gif

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