Competition Question

Decorating By deetmar Updated 13 Aug 2008 , 4:50pm by snowshoe1

deetmar Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:39pm
post #1 of 14

I have decided to enter a cake in the State Fair, I know I'm stupid. The rules state, "Cakes will be judged on visual effect and will not be cut, therefore cakes need not be real. Styrofoam dummies may be used. However, all cakes should be constructed in a way that could be accomplished in a real cake. Failure to observe this guideline will result in deductiobns in the score for execution of the design."

This is my questions, does this mean I have to use dowels, or can I just use royal icing to stick the layers together?

Thanks for the help.

13 replies
BethG Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:52pm
post #2 of 14

You can use royal icing. you don't have to use dowel rods. Hope this helps

Elserj Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:54pm
post #3 of 14

Yeah, I made a wedding cake for the county fair and didn't bother with dowel rods. They have the same exact statement. It has more to do with the shape of the cake. Like a really intricate carving that probably wouldn't been able to be done in real cake. Along those lines.

HTH

Sugarflowers Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:55pm
post #4 of 14

If you are using cake dummies, then Royal icing will work fine. You only need dowel rods for real cake.

If your design requires carving the cake then the cake has to be actual cake and not styrofoam.

Good luck and we want to see photos!

Michele

deetmar Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:58pm
post #5 of 14

Thanks guys, you just made my life a lot easier.

lorijom Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 12:52am
post #6 of 14

I'm also entering a competition and I've been wondering if a carved staircase on my bottom tier would be acceptable in a dummy cake? That doesn't seem like enough carving to require me to use real cake... Opinions?

Sugarflowers Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:47pm
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijom

I'm also entering a competition and I've been wondering if a carved staircase on my bottom tier would be acceptable in a dummy cake? That doesn't seem like enough carving to require me to use real cake... Opinions?




Sorry, if it's carved at all, then it has to be real cake. I judged a show last year that had a similar idea and we were not able to give it the ribbon the work deserved because it was carved out of styrofoam. It was a fantastic cake with wonderful details. All of the judges wanted it to place very well, but we had to go by the rules. If we had not, and there were some other cakes that were made in the same way, then we would have had a major problem explaining why is was okay for one cake but not all of them.

Good luck with your competition.

Michele

Kitagrl Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 5:11pm
post #8 of 14

I entered a competition earlier this year where I did a wedding and grooms cake....I didn't know we were allowed to do styrofoam for the wedding cake so I did all real...but when judging, they DID check to make sure my carved doggie grooms cake was real cake.

lorijom Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 2:04am
post #9 of 14

Thanks so much for the heads up...I would have been really bummed out to go to all that work only to be disqualified icon_sad.gif Re-thinking my design now.

armywifebryan Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 11:33pm
post #10 of 14

If in doubt, call and ask whoever is in charge of that competition. If nothing else it will put your mind at ease and you will know 100% what is allowed and what isn't. I have seen a few competitions that had varying rules. That is one reason I haven't entered yet. Gotta get a little more nerve up I guess. lol HTH

Teresa

deetmar Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 11:43pm
post #11 of 14

I have decided not to enter. I covered the styrofoam with fondant today, and I hate it. I have already made 200 roses and it's not near enough to cover the top layer, little lone the middle layer. I am so frustrated and tired.

I would much rather enter a "real" cake. I guess I need way more experience.

cakedout Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 11:58pm
post #12 of 14

Don't give up so easily! And every level of experience is generally welcomed at any competition!

And remember....if there isn't a size guideline (must be 3 tiers, at least 20" tall), why can't you simply downsize the design? I remember in my early days I thought I had to create some huge, eye-catching tiered cake. Then I got smart and began entering smaller cakes, which I was able to better design and decorate with a higher level of skill.

good luck to you!

Elserj Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:23pm
post #13 of 14

I've entered a carved styrofoam cake into our county fair and it got Best of Show. I think it all depends on the rules and type of judging. Calling the superintendent of the department will clear up any confusion.

snowshoe1 Posted 13 Aug 2008 , 4:50pm
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by deetmar

I have decided not to enter. I covered the styrofoam with fondant today, and I hate it. I have already made 200 roses and it's not near enough to cover the top layer, little lone the middle layer. I am so frustrated and tired.




So sorry to hear you are feeling this way.

What is it you hated about the covered dummy? Maybe we can help - covering dummies can be tricky the first time if you're used to working with cake.

I know this post is a little late - but I had an experience with a 3-layer dummy and I wish I had put in three center dowels to stabilize it. I used RI (and a lot of it) to keep the tiers together. The decorations were so heavy when I moved the dummy the RI just wasn't enough and the whole thing moved and decorations fell off - and, of course, smashed to pieces! So think about he weight of the decorations on your dummy before you discount center dowels.

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