How Do I Put 2 Different Cake Flavors Together?

Decorating By mommy1624 Updated 18 Jul 2008 , 8:09pm by SUELA

mommy1624 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:12pm
post #1 of 8

I have a friend who wants a cake that is half chocolate and half white and I have tried this in the past where I see a line down the middle once it's frosted. Any tips? (I usually try to talk people into marble in that case...LOL)

Thanks in advance!

7 replies
mcdonald Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:21pm
post #2 of 8

what size cake are you making?? I have taken a piece of plastic and wrapped it and inserted down the middle so that it would hold up while I poured each flavor in.. then remove carefully when full. I have also used cardboard wrapped up too

Lil_Belle Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:28pm
post #3 of 8

you could do one full cake one flavor and the other one the other flavor and then just cut them in half and frost together? maybe...

thedessertdiva Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:29pm
post #4 of 8

I like to do each layer as a flavor, so bake your cake (round, square, sheet) of each flavor. Split the cakes like you would for filling and use one flavor as the base and the other as the top. That way there is no bleading of flavors or messy dams you need to worry about.

Did I totaly confuse you?


Suzycakes Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:38pm
post #5 of 8

I just simply set one edge of the cake pan up on a few dishtowels and then put the white cake mix in. Then I bring the chocolate mix over and gently remove the towels and quickly pour in the chocolate mix and let them "Meet In The Middle". I find it is best to swirl the middle together with a spatula or knive. I have had some half sheet cakes separate where the flavors met.

This works like a charm for me!


Mencked Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:54pm
post #6 of 8

You can also fold a strip of aluminum foil, put it in the center of the pan, clipping the ends of the foil to the pan with mini bullclips, and then fill one side and then the other and then remove the foil before baking as usual. Works like a charm and I've also found it helpful to tilt one end of the pan up with dishtowels, like someone else said, until you can pour the other flavor in.

krystyne_wilson Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:59pm
post #7 of 8

These all seem like good ideas and depending on how she wanted it any way could work. I like the idea of using the 2 different pans and then layering them... icon_biggrin.gif

SUELA Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:09pm
post #8 of 8

This is pretty much the same question I asked about two weeks ago...glad you got more responses than I I just did this this past weekend. Bottom 16" square waas half white half choc...the 12" layer was half key lime half sour cream almond, and the top 8" was carrot.( The carrot and key lime were the big hits btw.) I baked each separately then cut in half and stuck together. My issue was not all the cakes rose to the same height and I had to be creative.

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