Bride Wants Her Anniversary Cake

Business By LNW Updated 20 Jul 2008 , 4:10pm by chutzpah

LNW Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 3:17pm
post #1 of 36

I did her wedding cake 2 years ago. She just emailed me, a couple of weeks before her 2 year anniversary, to request the cake. Seems a little late to me but I did promise them an anniversary cake and I didnât specify on the contract which anniversary. Do I go ahead and make the cake?

35 replies
Karema Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 3:30pm
post #2 of 36

I would just go ahead and make it. I probably would add that to your contract that it is the first year anniversary.

sari66 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:42pm
post #3 of 36

Yes, just make it she may have been busy or not wanting it last year icon_wink.gif

foxymomma521 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:53pm
post #4 of 36

Is it only a 6"? I'm think you should just go ahead and do it. With your cake fresh in their minds again, maybe they'll call you for the baby shower...

leah_s Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:56pm
post #5 of 36

I give them a gift certificate with an expiration date.

sweetideas Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:57pm
post #6 of 36

I totally forgot to get my anniversary cake...that first year flies by!!

Tiababe Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:00pm
post #7 of 36

Yeah, I would do it. But to echo what one poster already said....perhaps in your contract you should stipulate that an anniversary cake will be for the first anniversary only.

Jocmom Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:27pm
post #8 of 36

I know I was moving into a new house on my first anniversary. I had no time for an anniversary cake. That would have been just one more thing to pack!

indydebi Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:59pm
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I give them a gift certificate with an expiration date.




mine, too.

leah_s Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:19pm
post #10 of 36

Once again, Indy, we share a brain. icon_smile.gif

LeanneW Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:20pm
post #11 of 36

Leah and Debi...

do you specify the date(s) it can be redeemed on?

like for example is it only good on the anniversary date or for a time frame surrounding the anniversary date?

also, do you specify they have to give you a certain amount of notce to redeem it. I was just thinking what if they just show up on the anniv. expecting you made the cake and they didn't have to call and order it.

what would you do if they lost the gift certificate? would you honor it?

thanks ladies

loriemoms Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:27pm
post #12 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by leannewinslow

Leah and Debi...

do you specify the date(s) it can be redeemed on?

like for example is it only good on the anniversary date or for a time frame surrounding the anniversary date?

also, do you specify they have to give you a certain amount of notce to redeem it. I was just thinking what if they just show up on the anniv. expecting you made the cake and they didn't have to call and order it.

what would you do if they lost the gift certificate? would you honor it?

thanks ladies




I have in the contract that the free anniversary cake is for the FIRST anniversary and they must order it two weeks or more before thier first anniversary. I don't have to worry about dates, since they pretty much know when their first anniversary is, or do I have to worry about certificate printing or getting it to them, etc. They can pick out a cake flavor and filling, but I have the same 6 inch cake for everyone, buttercream, no flowers, just a simple design. I haven't had anyone just "show up" yet! Only about half my brides take advandage of this as well..many move away from the area or go ahead and save their top tier..

indydebi Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:33pm
post #13 of 36

Mine shows an expiration date, which is on their one-year anniversary. I also have written on there, "Two weeks notice is required".

Edited to add: Never underestimate the stupidity of the American Public. If there's no expiration date, even if it says it's for the FIRST anniversary, I swear to high heaven, they will argue with you "well, there's NO expiration date, so I should be able to get my 1st anniversary cake 5 years later!"

sari66 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 8:40pm
post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Mine shows an expiration date, which is on their one-year anniversary. I also have written on there, "Two weeks notice is required".

Edited to add: Never underestimate the stupidity of the American Public. If there's no expiration date, even if it says it's for the FIRST anniversary, I swear to high heaven, they will argue with you "well, there's NO expiration date, so I should be able to get my 1st anniversary cake 5 years later!"


LOL Debi you are so right!

loriemoms Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 9:12pm
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Mine shows an expiration date, which is on their one-year anniversary. I also have written on there, "Two weeks notice is required".

Edited to add: Never underestimate the stupidity of the American Public. If there's no expiration date, even if it says it's for the FIRST anniversary, I swear to high heaven, they will argue with you "well, there's NO expiration date, so I should be able to get my 1st anniversary cake 5 years later!"




You know those things you put on your car windshield to keep the sun from beating down on it all day and getting hot? Mine has a warning
"Remove before attempting to operate vehicle".

After seeing that, I can understand what you mean. People are well, people.

sweettoothmom Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:09pm
post #16 of 36

CC'rs let me ask a stupid question. You bake the original wedding cake and then part of the price is also an anniversary cake?
The original contract is for the wedding and anniversary cake inclusive? Do you show this as a bonus to the couple even thought you have the price costs etc enveloped in the fee your charging?

I tell people to eat the anniversary cake on thier one month anniversary not the one year because a frozen year old cake tastes like a frozen year old cake. CA CA!!!

Has this worked out well for you? Would you dare call the brides at the year mark and make arrangements for the anniversary cake?
What about at the time that they call for the anniversary cake you also give them a "special" on a baby shower cake?

loriemoms Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:18pm
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettoothmom

CC'rs let me ask a stupid question. You bake the original wedding cake and then part of the price is also an anniversary cake?
The original contract is for the wedding and anniversary cake inclusive? Do you show this as a bonus to the couple even thought you have the price costs etc enveloped in the fee your charging?

I tell people to eat the anniversary cake on thier one month anniversary not the one year because a frozen year old cake tastes like a frozen year old cake. CA CA!!!

Has this worked out well for you? Would you dare call the brides at the year mark and make arrangements for the anniversary cake?
What about at the time that they call for the anniversary cake you also give them a "special" on a baby shower cake?




I tell them serve the entire cake at the wedding...if they do save the top, I tell them eat it for thier first night home after their honeymoon, as part of that symbol of their first meal together in their new home.

I use it more as a selling item...its pretty common these days to offer a free anniversary cake.

Many couples wait years before having that first baby in my area...they probalby would all want todays prices 10 years from now! hahahha

disneynutbsv Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 10:28pm
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I give them a gift certificate with an expiration date.




But...realize this too...depending on which state you are in, Gift Certificates less than $100 cannot expire (its a law here in NH...so check your state laws!) icon_biggrin.gif

indydebi Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 1:04am
post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by disneynutbsv

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I give them a gift certificate with an expiration date.



But...realize this too...depending on which state you are in, Gift Certificates less than $100 cannot expire (its a law here in NH...so check your state laws!) icon_biggrin.gif




Is that for any gift certifcate ... or just the ones that the clients hand you money for?

I've heard of that when you hand a store a $20 bill and they give you a gift certificate for your niece's birthday. You exchanged real money for a certificate so if it "expires", that's like saying a $20 bill "expired".

But this is not a certificate where they have actually handed you money for it .... I am "giving" them a free cake a year from now. Technically, no money exchanged hands for this item.

Any idea, anyone? icon_confused.gif

gateauxdamour Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 1:25am
post #20 of 36

The anniversary cake "certificate" has always struck me as more of a "coupon." Redeemable within a certain time frame which is specified on the form and does not have a true cash value (i.e., they can't show up a year later and say "keep the cake, I want the $xx"). JMHO

disneynutbsv Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 3:23am
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by disneynutbsv

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I give them a gift certificate with an expiration date.



But...realize this too...depending on which state you are in, Gift Certificates less than $100 cannot expire (its a law here in NH...so check your state laws!) icon_biggrin.gif



Is that for any gift certifcate ... or just the ones that the clients hand you money for?

I've heard of that when you hand a store a $20 bill and they give you a gift certificate for your niece's birthday. You exchanged real money for a certificate so if it "expires", that's like saying a $20 bill "expired".

But this is not a certificate where they have actually handed you money for it .... I am "giving" them a free cake a year from now. Technically, no money exchanged hands for this item.

Any idea, anyone? icon_confused.gif




hmm, good point.. I don't know?
I own a hair salon, so of course when we give gift certificates we are receiving money in return, but sometimes when I want to give my customers something I give them a "coupon" good for and that "can" have an expiration date on it.

CakeMakar Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 3:44am
post #22 of 36

I don't understand why it matters when they redeem it? If they want it on their 1st or their 5th, you're still making a cake. As long as you both know you did their cake...not some stranger getting it?

Can someone clarify?

indydebi Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 3:53am
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMakar

I don't understand why it matters when they redeem it? If they want it on their 1st or their 5th, you're still making a cake. As long as you both know you did their cake...not some stranger getting it?

Can someone clarify?




Because:
(1) It's a FIRST anniversary cake, not a "whenever I want to get one" cake
(2) Technically, this is like an open account on my books .... it's an outstanding "check" that hasn't been cashed yet. I'm not keeping it open forever. It costs money to keep accounts open ... maintenance and monitoring, etc.
(3) When I offered the cake, it had a value of $X. 5 years later, it now has a value of $3X, so they are actually getting MORE than what the original offer was for.
(4) I don't owe something to someone for the rest of their life.

Git-R-Dun!!!!!!!!!!

disneynutbsv Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 3:58am
post #24 of 36

I couldn't agree more Indy!

Melvira Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:15am
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMakar

I don't understand why it matters when they redeem it? If they want it on their 1st or their 5th, you're still making a cake. As long as you both know you did their cake...not some stranger getting it?

Can someone clarify?




I was just going to mirror Indydeb on this one... if I make the cake for them next year, I am giving them (for example) $20 worth of free cake. If I make it 5 years from now, it might be $50 worth of free cake. I'm not down with that. Not to mention... you don't want, say 75% of your brides 'holding out' on their anniv. cakes, then you end up with a year where half of your business is freebie cakes, and you're having to turn down paying jobs to make the free ones. Not fun!

mom2spunkynbug Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:20am
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

(4) I don't owe something to someone for the rest of their life.

Git-R-Dun!!!!!!!!!!




LOL!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Ok, now I need to think about how I'm going to handle this. I tell all my customers that they get a free 1 year anniversary cake so they don't have to eat 1-year-old frozen cake, but I don't have it in my contract anywhere. And I already have 7 contracts done so far. I was thinking maybe sending them something out with their final statement (which will show their cake paid off). Maybe sending a general flyer? That states the size (6" round) and the flavors (same as wedding cake) and the date it must be used by along with a "two-week notice required" how does that sound??

CoutureCake Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 5:38am
post #27 of 36

In regard to the state law thing on gift certificates, you've got to read what your state's law is (and that of surrounding states if you're on the boarder like I am). I know here if YOU issue the certificate or gift card, there CAN be an expiration date here... HOWEVER, if there is any money exchanged that card cannot lose $$ value. Granted, the buying power of $$ can change over time, but at least here, you can have an expiration on something originating from you that doesn't have monetary exchanges for the certificate applied. You've got to know your state's laws so you can do it so you can have the expiration attached.

"This certificate entitles you to a free 6" first anniversary cake design matched to your original wedding cake's top tier. This certificate expires on (two to six months after their first anniversary - that way if they forget they still have a chance). Please call (number) at least 2-6 weeks in advance of the date you would like to pick up the cake and mention this certificate. This certificate may not be exchanged for cash and has no monetary value"

indydebi Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 11:24am
post #28 of 36

i leave the certificate in an envelope on the cake table when I deliver the cake. When talking with the brides, I tell them to put the certificate in their wedding book "....so you don't forget about it!" Mine expires 365 days after their wedding. It's a first anniversary cake and should be picked up in time for their first anniversary.

poshcakedesigns Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:21am
post #29 of 36

If you didn't specify an expiration date I'd go ahead and do the cake

Cakepro Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:58am
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxymomma521

I'm think you should just go ahead and do it. With your cake fresh in their minds again, maybe they'll call you for the baby shower...




Seriously!

Who cares if they missed their first anniversary...bake 'em a cake, fulfill your obligation, make the customer happy, and maybe you will get more orders from them.

I don't see how this is a big deal...or why you would even question doing it for them. *Shrug* JMO

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