Any Other Cake Business Ideas?

Business By Kate714 Updated 21 Jul 2008 , 10:17pm by Mac

Kate714 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 1:28am
post #1 of 36

Hi all,

Since it's very difficult to get licensed here and all my ideas for starting a cake business seem to fizzle out, I'm wondering if anyone has any other cake-related business, other than making and selling cakes? Selling cake decorating stuff? Hosting cake decorating themed parties? Anyone have ideas?? icon_biggrin.gif

35 replies
johnson6ofus Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:41am
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I once thought about kid's "cookie decorating" parties. Like 8-13 year olds. Provide 3 (or more) pre-made blank cookies, and supply the icing, markers, sprinkles, etc.

Kind of like a tea party theme, but make your own cookies. Like build-a-bear, or those paint your own pottery places.....

leannsloan Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:56am
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Maybe teach cake and cookie decorating you still get to do what you love and share it with others I hope this helps

all4cake Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:15am
post #4 of 36

develop/perfect recipes...compile tested recipes...


Make cake decorations(some states(even some that don't license home-based bakeries) allow this as long as they're labeled "for decoration only")

Kate714 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 12:03pm
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thanks guys! keep em comin'!! icon_biggrin.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:56pm
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With the decorating parties, aren't you still baking and selling the cookies/cakes? How would that be any different than selling?

BrandisBaked Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 4:59pm
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Wedding cake dummy rental. I hear it's all the rage. icon_wink.gif

all4cake Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:18pm
post #8 of 36

Cookies, cakes,icings can be purchased in bulk for the decorating party idea. One would need adequate storage.

It would be a good thing to run any food related business by the health dept. first. I would request a meeting with an inspector to discuss the business in detail....so the details can be evaluated and given the benefit of any exceptions that may be out there for a food related business....so, it's not classified with others and evaluated under the same rules....make sure they know that the basis of your business isn't baking and selling a product from home but supplying a pre-made product and a service.

I love the dummy rental idea.

-K8memphis Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:32pm
post #9 of 36

Hey, Kate!

Great name you have there and not only that but we're also walking in the same mocassins of too hard to do cakes in my state.

As far as like doing parties I think one can get around the licensing thing by prepping/baking the cookies on their premises. So that's a little more prep time -- gotta haul your ka around whatever and I'm not completely positive but that's a possibility.

Then I'll put it this way if you are entertaining doing any kind of tupperware type 'parties' or 'classes' with any companies, be sure they have they own exclusive line of products. For example Pampered Chef, May Kay, Home Interiors all have unique products.
*Edited to say: so should any cake companies like this that you might know. They need to have exclusive products too.

Besides talking about cakes or making one, I really really really like to make cool cake boards and bases. I love to make cake stands.

I have a couple on my website but I think I would like to do that maybe when I grow up. That and wrestle the grizzly bears in my county that set up 'the rules'. hahaha not funny icon_lol.gif

Any bakeries around there need any help maybe?

Happy day to you!!

Edited as above*

MichelleM77 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 5:35pm
post #10 of 36

I think it would be fun to have private lessons, but more like be hired out when someone wants to make a cake for a party, but can't do it themselves, but want to be a part of it. So they hire you to come and help them decorate a cake. Might be too hard and you will still have a lot of work to do, but there are private chefs doing similar things, so why not private bakers?

sweettoothmom Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 11:16pm
post #11 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked

Wedding cake dummy rental. I hear it's all the rage. icon_wink.gif




Actually you can make these dummies and then take them to a host of boutiques in your area. THey can be used a decor. i remember my grandmother never had an empty cake plate on her counter. If it was empty it was being washed and prepped for the cake that was in the oven. I love making dummies for weddings.

sweettoothmom Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 11:19pm
post #12 of 36

Hey another thing I know a lot of poeple who are not working from a licensed kitchen are still working but they only sell etc online. THe internet has no such rules. I dont know how that works but they are doing a bang up business.

LeanneW Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 11:37pm
post #13 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettoothmom

Hey another thing I know a lot of poeple who are not working from a licensed kitchen are still working but they only sell etc online. THe internet has no such rules. I dont know how that works but they are doing a bang up business.




sorry if i misunderstood what you were saying, but, are you saying that you think as long as the cake is sold online that the seller doesn't need to be lisenced? or are you talking about selling other tings, not food?

I don't think that is true. I believe you would still fall under the laws of where you do your business from. I think you still need a business lisence, pay taxes, health dept. permit, etc.

I would hate for someone to be mislead and get in trouble.

krystyne_wilson Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 11:39pm
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So if you advertise ONLY online you can make and sell cakes out of your home like under the table? icon_confused.gif

LeanneW Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 11:42pm
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kate714

I'm wondering if anyone has any other cake-related business, other than making and selling cakes? Selling cake decorating stuff? Hosting cake decorating themed parties? Anyone have ideas?? icon_biggrin.gif




I saw on someone's website, I think it might have been a CCer. They have pics of cakes with flowers and such on them and they sell the "kit" to make that cake.

I think the kit includes the GP flowers and instructions for placing them. Everything included in inedible. you could include ribbon, a recipe for cake and frosting, a decorated cake board for the finished cake, maybe also the dowels and cake circles too.

Kate714 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 12:43pm
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked

Wedding cake dummy rental. I hear it's all the rage. icon_wink.gif




has anyone done this? I'm wondering what people would charge...and does the couple get to pick their design and you make it or do they pick from ones you already have? icon_confused.gif

-K8memphis Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 12:57pm
post #17 of 36

I don't do this but I am tempted.

Off the top of my head I would charge about $1 per serving plus a big deposit of about $3 per serving. $100 minimum. I'd rent it like a tux--gotta have it back right away and it's gotta look great or money is deducted. Nothing broke.

I've seen on tv that this done in Japan a lot.

Wow that's a great idea though. Here's a tag on idea--do the flowers on the cake so the bride can give them to bridesmaids as thier gifts. That way there's less to break in all the hoopla going on. Provide boxes.

Hey you can do the East Coast I'll' do the MidSouth. We'll get another couple Kate's to do the West & Southwest.

Totally just kidding but this is getting my old self a little motivated--thanks!

icon_biggrin.gif

loriemoms Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 1:10pm
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked

Wedding cake dummy rental. I hear it's all the rage. icon_wink.gif




I was thinking the same thing! Do you have to have a legal kitchen to do wedding cake dummies?

Also, how about gum paste flowers? Can you make gum paste flowers without having a legal kitchen? I bet other bakeries would buy them up in a snap!!

MichelleM77 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 1:23pm
post #19 of 36

If you check out ebay and etsy's rules and regulations, it mentions food regulations vary by state, that basically you are to follow those and if not, you are selling at your own risk.

http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/food.html

Kate714 Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 1:29pm
post #20 of 36

I would think the legal kitchen aspect would not apply because nothing is edible?? icon_confused.gif You're basically just providing decorations for the reception.

-K8memphis Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 2:13pm
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kate714

I would think the legal kitchen aspect would not apply because nothing is edible?? icon_confused.gif You're basically just providing decorations for the reception.




Geez on the one hand I'd feel bad about cutting into folk's territory by doing dummies and lessening the purchase of wedding cakes. But I'd for sure be legal-ish. I mean you'd have to set up like a for real business and collect and pay tax and be good that way.

I mean I've thought a thousand time about doing dummies before but never took it possibly serious till now.

Ooo Oooo got a thought for yah. This is good. You sell them the cake for the same as they'd pay for a for real cake. Then you buy it back from them according to how it looks when it is returned. Y'know buy it back for a lot if it looks fine and for much less if it's very damaged. But I mean there isn't too much to really get messed up. Especially if they use the flowers for bridesmaids gifts.

AND for real bakeries could compete this way too. It does not create a monster that will eat them up. Because that would haunt me. I've been in business and it is not right to undercut. So they could do it too. Plus they would get the orders for easy peasy sheet cakes that they can pump out for easy.

But this would be way cool.

I am actually getting slightly motivated. Don't worry I'm sure it will pass soon icon_lol.gif

leannsloan Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 3:56pm
post #22 of 36

What about mimi wedding cakes so they could be put on the tables as centerpiece them can be given away to the wedding party as a gift the mini cake can look like the actual wedding cake that people eat that would be cool Here is another idea holiday parties at my husband work they always have a centerpiece in the table and someone at that table wins the centerpice to take home make mini dummies for any reception. What do you think about this

leannsloan Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:00pm
post #23 of 36

sorry guys about my typing I think faster than I can type alot of spelling mistakes

leannsloan Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:23pm
post #24 of 36

Here's another thought I do more cookies than cakes and at christmas everyone says they are to pretty to eat. And asks how to preserves them I even been asked if I would make them into an ornaments just an idea

cocobean Posted 19 Jul 2008 , 4:38pm
post #25 of 36

o.k. here is a totally different idea. icon_eek.gif How about making gourmet doggie treats? icon_surprised.gif We were on vacation a few weeks ago and were shopping. There was the cutest little bakery that sold all gourmet doggie treats. It looked like a regular bakery at first but at closer look the goodies were all for dogs. Fun shapes and things dipped in white chocolate, sprinkles etc (dogs can have white chocolate, because it's really not chocolate). Anyway I was thinking surely you wouldn't have to have a legal kitchen to make doggie treats. You could sell them to a lot of different places: dog groomers, farmers markets, vets, on line etc. What do you think about that? I've been thinking about it myself. They could be packaged really fun. You know some people really spoil their dogs!!! judge.gif Maybe there is money in it and you could also be a creative baker! icon_biggrin.gif

Kate714 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 2:21am
post #26 of 36

k8memphis...all good ideas! although it would be tough to negotiate w/the couple on how much their wedding cake got damaged, don't you think?

the doggie treat idea is kind of cute!! icon_smile.gif

-K8memphis Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:39pm
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kate714

k8memphis...all good ideas! although it would be tough to negotiate w/the couple on how much their wedding cake got damaged, don't you think?

the doggie treat idea is kind of cute!! icon_smile.gif




There's a restaurant in NE Illinois called The Warsaw Inn. It's a Polish smorgasbord. If you leave any of the food on your plate they charge you for it. Eat all you want but don't waste any. There's a price for each different type of wasted leftovers printed on the menu.

So all that to say, I think if you have it clearly outlined in advance that will avoid any negotiation because I agree negotiation would be crazy.

They have a sincerely vested interest in getting that cake back in one piece so that they can get thier moolah back. I'd have a nice easy box to slide it into under the table as always. Their buy back price would reduce with each day longer they keep it. I think it's very do-able.

Doggie treats require their own kind of rules regulations and restrictions. Not the least of which is preservatives for shelf life. Also do-able but not a freebie by any means.

sweettoothmom Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 5:57pm
post #28 of 36

I am not condoning working without proper licensing I am saying however that it is being done. It is primarily being done online because there is no way of regulating what can be sold online. You could say you are anywhere online.. So how can they realistically govern the internet?

I know of one peanut brittle company who made all of thier product in thier home kitchen assisted by thier 6 young children and they are the number one seller of peanut brittle in the US. They have however found that thier local health department is requiring they add on to thier home as a dedicated commercial kitchen to continue working. They did comply but thier home kitchen opens directly into the commercial facility so it is really no difference to how they work.

In my state the health department cant close you down they cant even give you a fine for working outside a commercial facility. It is a matter of technicality, obtaining a license etc..... This law also is in effect for all restaurants.

I am a fan of the legal way, the right way of doing things is always best. I am simply sharing what is going on. I am not saying do it go break the law. I am saying pay your taxes get the proper licensing when and where you can. BUT others arent and I thought you might want to be aware. icon_smile.gif

Mac Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 6:36pm
post #29 of 36

Just as an FYI, the health department CAN monitor sites that sell over the internet. AND if you are in their jurisdiction, can fine you.

As for the doggie treat business...you have to have a manufacturing license, proper facilities to make them AND the FDA will come and spend the day with you to see how you prepare, make, store and package your product. Products are also weighed and you have to have that little ingredients list on each package.

I know because I checked into doing it for prepackaged cookies and doggie treats.

Sorry to burst your balloon; however, with the pets dying from the bad pet food, they have gotten pretty stringent about that area, too.

sweettoothmom Posted 21 Jul 2008 , 7:25pm
post #30 of 36

Thanks for sharing that Mac. It must be different in your area. In our state the Health Dept cant fine you and in the areas where this Peanut brittle is manufactured they cant fine you either. It is all smoke and mirrors. By asking you to obtaint he license you assume if you dont they can fine you. Our state is a little backward in making laws and then completing them with legal ramifications. when they are broken.
Also the health department does not scout the internet hunting for businesses in thier area that sell food online. If someone turned you into them I am sure you would have a hell storm on you though icon_smile.gif
Really I am not saying go break the law!! Please do not break the law. I am pointing out as an attorney could do that there are loop holes in the laws.

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