Hello Everyone! Can I Borrow Your Advice?

Decorating By crazycanuk Updated 16 Jul 2008 , 9:28pm by tchrmom

crazycanuk Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:43pm
post #1 of 23

Hello there, my name is Stacey and I am brand new to the site! I was thankfully referred here by my cake decorating instructor!

First off, I am in my 2nd week of course 1 and I am absolutely loving it. Can't wait to get more into it.

I have a few newbie questions that I am hoping you will be able to help me with.

1) Buttercream receipe, I used the one in the course book, but I am wondering if there is another receipe that is just as good, that uses less shortening, etc etc?

2) I am contemplating getting the wilton round 8"x2" pan. I use some cheaper ones now, and I am wondering what the pros/cons are of going wilton? I had troubles with my cakes sticking smack in the middle of my cheaper pans (despite coating the pan), any suggestions on what can be used to prevent further sticking? With a wilton pan (8"x2") do you use 2 store boxed mixes?

Sorry for all the questions.

And TIA for all your help!

22 replies
foxymomma521 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:52pm
post #2 of 23

Welcome!! What did you use to coat your pans? If you are looking into getting a new set of pans there are brands other than Wilton... (I like Magic Line) For a set of 8 x 2 pans you only need one mix. As far as buttercream, check the recipe section. Everyone has their own preference icon_smile.gif Good Luck!

bkdcakes Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:58pm
post #3 of 23

Welcome to our addiction!

On the sticking, do you line the pans with parchment or waxed paper? If not, try that. Just grease the pan, then cut the paper to fit the bottom & lay it in there. Fill & bake. Just make sure you grease the sides, too.

There are tons of recipes on this site. Check them out & try them out, see what you like.

Any 8x2 would use 1 box mix for 2 pans. If you use a doctored cake mix recipe, it goes a little further.

Again, welcome! icon_biggrin.gif Ask all the questions you like! You can search the forums, or sometimes someone will direct you to a forum topic that will help you, too.

Cake_Princess Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:59pm
post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazycanuk

Hello there, my name is Stacey and I am brand new to the site! I was thankfully referred here by my cake decorating instructor!

First off, I am in my 2nd week of course 1 and I am absolutely loving it. Can't wait to get more into it.

I have a few newbie questions that I am hoping you will be able to help me with.

1) Buttercream receipe, I used the one in the course book, but I am wondering if there is another receipe that is just as good, that uses less shortening, etc etc?

2) I am contemplating getting the wilton round 8"x2" pan. I use some cheaper ones now, and I am wondering what the pros/cons are of going wilton? I had troubles with my cakes sticking smack in the middle of my cheaper pans (despite coating the pan), any suggestions on what can be used to prevent further sticking? With a wilton pan (8"x2") do you use 2 store boxed mixes?

Sorry for all the questions.

And TIA for all your help!





I would suggest sticking with the recipe if it's for the course. This way if you run in to problems with your icing your instructor can easily help you trouble shoot the issues. Otherwise, there are tonnes of recipes in the recipe section as mentioned before.

Gale Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:00pm
post #5 of 23

Stacey,
Welcome to the site. You will find so much helpful advice on here. As far as the icing, there are several buttercream recipes on here you may want to try. I use Wilton and Magic Line pans. I like both. You can get 2 - 8inch layers from 1 box mix (2" thick). If you bake your cake at 325 instead of 350, it should rise even with the top of your pan. As far as the sticking issue, some people put parchment paper in the bottom of their pans. Hope this helps.

danijus Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:01pm
post #6 of 23

Welcome to CC. I use the wilton pans and never had a problem. I use crisco and flour on them and nothing ever stuck. I'm sure there are better out there. Just bought a fat daddio but haven't tried it yet. As for buttercream recipes, there are many. If you are looking for a crusting buttercream, try:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-6992-0-Indydebis-Crisco-Based-Buttercream-Icing.html
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-5313-0-Sugarshacks-Buttercream-Icing.html

If you want a meringue buttercream try:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-6927-0-Very-Vanilla-Swiss-Meringue-Buttercream.html

toodlesjupiter Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:01pm
post #7 of 23

crazycanuk- Hi and Welcome! I agree with foxymomma on Magic Line being a better pan to buy. Also, if your cake is sticking in the middle, it helps to line your pans with parchment paper before baking. I line, spray with Pam and bake. No more sticking. I just started using Sugarshack's recipe, but it is made with shortening. Otherwise, I just used 1c. butter, 1c. shortening, 2 lbs. powdered sugar, flavoring and enough half & half to reach desired consistency. There are many, many variations though. My advice would be to test a few different recipes to see what works for you. Hope that helps!

CakeWhizz Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:04pm
post #8 of 23

Hi Crazycanuk! Welcome to CC. It's one of the best friendliest and sometimes drama filled cake forums around and I guarantee that you will be hooked in no time. I will suggest that you invest in very good cake pans and I have heard good things about Magic Line and Fat Daddio's. With regards to cakes sticking to the bottom of the pans, my preference is to either use Wilton's spray release or to line my pans with non stick baking paper.

I only use buttercream for filling and crumb coating and I use a Swiss Meringue Buttercream (non crusting) which can be flavoured in a lot of ways.
For a demo of how to make it visit



For a crusting butternream recipe, I suggest you use Sugarshack's recipe which can be found in the recipe section as it comes highly recommended by other CCers. I wish you the very best and enjoy the journey!

yelle66 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:05pm
post #9 of 23

If you do go with the Wilton pans, I would try to get the decorator preferred ones and not just the performance ones. I have some of the latter in the 8 inch and somehow they are bent and they just don't bake as well as my others. I really try to avoid Wilton whenever I can b/c I think alot of their stuff is crap, but I do have several decorator preferred pans and those are alright. I like my Magic Line pans better. Definitely do the parchment rounds at the bottom of the pan, they won't stick anymore.

And good luck! This place is VERY addicting! icon_biggrin.gif

crazycanuk Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:12pm
post #10 of 23

Thank you everyone for all the advice! It is greatly appreciated!

I will go hunt around town for some magic-line pans, I have never actually seen these before.

Thank you for all the points to the right direction!

I should ask you as well, is there any good online stores that you can purchase these pans and other supplies from? I find michaels to be expensive.

I have been trying to find cake 'cardboard boxes' or an equivalent to be able to take my finished cakes and transport (disposable, resusable).

Thanks again!

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:16pm
post #11 of 23

Welcome, Stacey. You'll learn a lot here.

My opinion is that the Magic Line pans are really great, and so are Fat Daddio's (a newer line).

As you've read from all the other previous responses, there are hundreds of different buttercream recipes. You can find them right here on Cake Central if you just click on the recipes tab. I suggest though for class, to just use the Wilton one that's given to you (as long as you can eat it if you're planning on eating your cakes). It's easier to guage how each batch will likely turn out and how to thin or firm them up, if needed. After you've taken the classes, or outside of class, it'll be fun to experiment with all the different types and flavors of buttercream to see which ones you like and which ones work best for you.

Good luck and, again, welcome to CC.

TexasSugar Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:17pm
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cake_Princess

I would suggest sticking with the recipe if it's for the course. This way if you run in to problems with your icing your instructor can easily help you trouble shoot the issues. Otherwise, there are tonnes of recipes in the recipe section as mentioned before.




As a WMI I'd also have to say PLEASE use the class buttercream recipe in class for all the practice and piping. Trouble shooting is one of the reasons, another is because it holds up better than some other buttercreams for the repeated use in class.

By all means play with your icing at home and you can always use what you want to ICE your cake with for class. There are many great recipes on here that you can try.

I use the Wilton pans all the time and haven't had problems with them. When I use the 8x3 I use one cake mix. For the 8x2 I will use 1.5 mixes (or a doctored mix) for two nice pretty full 2in layers.

mushbug9 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:22pm
post #13 of 23

Just a suggestion for sticking, I got a recipe on here for a homemade non stick....well I will just say it...glob. Its the recipe that was given out at the Wilton courses back before Wilton made the non stick spray they have. It is simple. Equal amounts of flour, oil and shortening. Beat well. Paint onto pans before putting in the mix. You barely have a CRUMB left in the pan. Also make sure you are turning the cakes out within 5- 10 minutes after taking them out. Everyone varies on their exact time. I flip mine onto a rack immediately after closing the oven and very rarely do I have a broken or stuck cake. the reason have to turn it out while the pan and cake are still hot is because all the sprays ect have shortening. Shortening sets when it cools. It will litterally glue your cake to your pan. LOL.
the parchment as mentioned is a great way as well, I am just too cheap to spend the money icon_eek.gif
Welcome and here is to hoping you learn as much as we each have and more. icon_smile.gif

roxxxy_luvs_duff Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:32pm
post #14 of 23

I use wilton and magic line pans. I like wilton because it bakes a lot faster but magic lines give me a cake with a flatter top. I always bake at 325.

i would use the wilton recipe for class but for something you are making that you want to eat I like the Buttercream Dream recipe

showersfamily4 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:36pm
post #15 of 23

As for purchasing supplies, see if you have a local cake shop that sells supplies. There are a couple here in my town that sell all sorts of things, including pans and boxes for transporting cakes. One of them will even order things for me that she doesn't ordinarily have on hand. Sometimes things are cheaper on line, but with shipping costs it isn't always the case.

cocorum21 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:38pm
post #16 of 23

I usually line the bottom of my pans with parchment cirlcles. You can buy them precut but I just cut my own. Here's a diagram on how to cut them.
LL

jennifer7777 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:47pm
post #17 of 23

Hey...welcome to CC.

I have used Wilton, Magic Line and Williams-Sonoma cake pans and I love them all. I bake at 325 for slower, more even baking...cuz I hate going through the trouble of heating cores and bake-even strips.

For my buttercream I use the Wilton recipe with the 1/2 shortening, 1/2 butter...full strength for all of my cake decorating. I DO NOT thin it out like Wilton class suggests (although I used to)

As far as cakes coming out of the pan, my favorite is PAM for baking. I literally set a timer for 10 min. after taking the cake out of the oven and turn it out after the 10 min. NO LONGER. Through trial and error I have found that once you let cakes start sitting for 15 or more minutes, the stuff you use to keep them from sticking to the pan is the SAME stuff that makes it stick to the pan because it solidifies. 10 min is all you need...it gives the cake a little time to settle and is not too hot to handle the pan (still use baking mitts though icon_wink.gif )

Hope you enjoy your time here on CC as much as I have...I am an addict.

foxymomma521 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:49pm
post #18 of 23

www.fondant source.com (take out the space) they ship to Canada
coupon code "cakecentral" will take off 10% icon_smile.gif

CakeMakar Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 5:56pm
post #19 of 23

Check out eBay for Fat Daddio pans - one of the sellers/stores has fantastic prices for them. I only have one, but I love it.

I would agree with using the Wilton icing for class. It really helps you learn the consistency and troubleshooting/repair so you'll know what to look for when you are on your own with a new recipe and have to tweak it.

BigTexinWV Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 7:22pm
post #20 of 23

I don't know if this is a problem, but when I first started to make cakes I could not for the life of me make a strawberry cake. For about a month I could only make yellow cakes, since then I can make any flavor. Maybe the consistancy was too weird.

I still don't know what I did wrong, maybe the cake could sense my fear!?!?!

I would also stick with the buttercream your instructor wants you to use, somethimes using butter in buttercream melts to fast in class because you are holding the bag watching the instructor, it can really mess up the consistancy. Once you know what to do, you will not have to hold the bag so long thinking about bag postitions, pressure, and other details.

lbass Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 8:43pm
post #21 of 23

Welcome to CC!!

My advice would be to go on the forums and read as much as you can.
I've learned more reading here than anywhere. Everyone is so helpful and before you know it you will laughing and crying with the rest of us.
When you finish your wilton classes, check out Sugarshack's videos.

Good Luck!!! icon_wink.gif

aundrea Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 9:00pm
post #22 of 23

hi and welcome!!!
everyone here has given you great advice.
i hope you take time to look around and have a fun here!

tchrmom Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 9:28pm
post #23 of 23

Parchment paper is one of the better inventions. I cut my own circles too. I just pull out paper twice as long as I need (if I need two, which I usually do), trace the pan, fold, and cut both at the same time following the outline I drew.
GOod luck.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%