What Do You Do With Your Wedding Cakes?

Decorating By veronica970206 Updated 20 Jul 2008 , 5:16pm by Junecakes

veronica970206 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 2:50pm
post #1 of 15

I have heard so many different ways on stacking for a wedding cake, which one is the best way? When using cardboard circles, do you cover them with foil? Do you place a wax paper circle on top of the cardboard circle? Or do you just use the plastic seperator plates? If you use the palstic plates how do you get them back from the bride and groom? Or do you not get them back?

The reason why I am asking these questions is because I am doing my first wedding cake next year, I have stacked cakes and normally I use the cardboard circles with a wax paper circle on top, but the cakes I do that for are for birthdays, or little special occassions to where family and friends ask me to bring a cake which is usually free because it gives me more practice/experience, but I am so excited and nervous at the same time, because I know I have to start some where, but I just need to know what is the best way of going about it. I am calm, but I keep thinking this is so different than a baby shower/bridal shower, cookout, etc, ya know? Anyway, thanks so much in advance, you all are fabulous!!!

Sincerely,
Veronica

14 replies
Shelly4481 Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 7:21pm
post #2 of 15

Not sure if I can help, but will try!!! I have done my cakes 3 different ways. I have just used cardboard plain and have covered them with that press n seal on the cakes that you wont see. I have also used the plastic plates, but I put the cake on a cardboard too. I usually get all my stuff back from bride and groom (usually a family member will bring it back). I use a support system that is called SFS (stress free support) and I don't have to worry about getting everything back because I live in a small town and always know the bride/groom or family. I do charge a fee for the use of all my supplies. Now I have been using foam core boards to put my cakes on. For the bottom board I usually use a big piece of ply board for strenght and cover it. HTH

indydebi Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 8:57pm
post #3 of 15

You don't have to cover cardboards. Some people think they will get soggy and collapse .. they won't. They'll hold up fine.

If I have a 3-tier drop-n-run cake, and if I HAVE to use any plastic plates (i.e. wilton disposable hidden pillars plus one 6" plate under the top tier, because they wanted 2" of space between the top and middle tier), then I just eat the cost .... it's not worth $15 worth of gas to get $8 worth of plastic back.

You can include the cost of the plastic in your invoice if you don't want to screw around with getting them returned. OTherwise, family members are usually pretty good about returning them. You might leave a small plastic trash bag for them to put the stuff in, plus a list of what needs returned. I use white trash bags so I can black-magic-marker my name and phone number on the bag.

veronica970206 Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 7:29pm
post #4 of 15

I never used plain cardboard plates because sooooo many people say the cake sticks and peels back the cardboard and so on and so on. I then thought, why do they make them if it does that? I am sooooooooooo glad to hear that it does not ruin the cake, I figured I can decorate the cakes, stack them when I get there the next day and then they will have the staff at the hall slice the cake accordingly. I just wanted to make sure on what was best to do with this wedding cake. Thanks so much everyone, if you have any more advice to offer, please tell me, I really appreciate it.

Sincerely,
Veronica

loriemoms Posted 18 Jul 2008 , 9:47pm
post #5 of 15

I also dont cover my boards..they are waxed and I have put cakes on them from the oven and wrapped them and put them in the freezer for weeks and they never got soggy, so I doubt they will get soggy just sitting for a day or two! haha!

Anyway, I use the SPS system..boards on plates. I also just put the cost of the system into the price of the cake..some brides give them back, some don't. I agree, its not worth the price of gas to try to get them back. When I have something more expensive like a fountain, etc, I charge a deposit and leave them with a list of the parts and a box to put it in..I usually get it back from the mom or maid of honor, etc, the next day.

2txmedics Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 12:13am
post #6 of 15

I put my wedding cakes on wilton plates, they are plastic...When i make a cake I include a "supply fee" for the plates...the way I work is like this:

supply usage fee 25.00 or whatever the plate cost me and how many I use I just add the price per cake I paid on that item...my contact says...

if not returned 1 week after the wedding, the fee is non refundable...if they return them...I do refund the money. That money I put to the side.
Since I live out in the out skirts...this fee helps pay for the plates and I only lose gas miles, but I wait until Im in town to buy more when I get groceries, which everyone goes to walmart almost daily or every few days. HOPE THIS HELPS.

leah_s Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 7:45am
post #7 of 15

As everyone knows, I'm a big fan of SPS for construction. So, I use cardboards and the SPS plates.

sweetcravings Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 9:16am
post #8 of 15

I wondered this same thing. I've not done many stacked cakes, but did do my neice and son's first communion cake. I used cardboard cake circles under each cake, uncovered. When we went to pull the cakes one off the other i couldn't believe how soft those cardboards got from sucking up all the oil in the buttercream. It was somewhat difficult to lift them off since they were sooo soft. I was relieved that the whole thing didn't collapse. It certainly made me rethink how i might do this in the future. I'd be interested to hear what others think.

Suz

misha35 Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 12:12pm
post #9 of 15

I've done several stacked cakes & cover the cardboard with foil.. It seemed to protect the cake board from getting soggy and reduced my worries. Also made it easy for me to pry the layers apart.
good luck!!!.

loriemoms Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 12:29pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcravings

I wondered this same thing. I've not done many stacked cakes, but did do my neice and son's first communion cake. I used cardboard cake circles under each cake, uncovered. When we went to pull the cakes one off the other i couldn't believe how soft those cardboards got from sucking up all the oil in the buttercream. It was somewhat difficult to lift them off since they were sooo soft. I was relieved that the whole thing didn't collapse. It certainly made me rethink how i might do this in the future. I'd be interested to hear what others think.

Suz




Were these waxed circles or just plain cardboard?

indydebi Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 12:57pm
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcravings

I wondered this same thing. I've not done many stacked cakes, but did do my neice and son's first communion cake. I used cardboard cake circles under each cake, uncovered. When we went to pull the cakes one off the other i couldn't believe how soft those cardboards got from sucking up all the oil in the buttercream. It was somewhat difficult to lift them off since they were sooo soft. I was relieved that the whole thing didn't collapse. It certainly made me rethink how i might do this in the future. I'd be interested to hear what others think.

Suz



Were these waxed circles or just plain cardboard?




Suz, I'd be questioning just how "wet" your icing was when you put those cardboards on there? My cakes sit around assembled for a couple of days and I have never experienced what you just described, but my icing crusts very well, so my cardboards aren't sitting on 'wet' icing ... there is not really any moisture to be absorbed. And I stay and cut my cakes, so I see personally each and every cake I do.

As loriemoms asked ... are you using the cardboards designed to be used with cakes or are you ... as I've seen some poeple say they do .... making your own out of boxes 'n such (not such a food safe thing to do in my opinion).

Suzycakes Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:16pm
post #12 of 15

I started out using the regular cardboard rounds and squares or the Wilton plates. But Leahs has converted me to the SPS system! It is a fantastic, inexpensive stacking system. It is super simple to use.

Check it out through Leahs posts and information -- you won't be sorry!

Suze

robinscakes Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 1:35pm
post #13 of 15

I also include the cost of the plastic support like 2txmedics. I don't offer a refund on them. I just include the suppport as part of the cake. No one has ever asked me if they can return it and get their money back. I suppose I would take plates back, but not the hidden pillars since they're all cut to size and each cake will be slightly different in height. I've never had anyone complain about the cost as it is pretty minimal compared to the cost of the cake. I think it would me more of a headache than it's worth to charge a deposit and go retrieve the items or have the couple return them.

sweetcravings Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 4:58pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by loriemoms

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcravings

I wondered this same thing. I've not done many stacked cakes, but did do my neice and son's first communion cake. I used cardboard cake circles under each cake, uncovered. When we went to pull the cakes one off the other i couldn't believe how soft those cardboards got from sucking up all the oil in the buttercream. It was somewhat difficult to lift them off since they were sooo soft. I was relieved that the whole thing didn't collapse. It certainly made me rethink how i might do this in the future. I'd be interested to hear what others think.

Suz



Were these waxed circles or just plain cardboard?



Suz, I'd be questioning just how "wet" your icing was when you put those cardboards on there? My cakes sit around assembled for a couple of days and I have never experienced what you just described, but my icing crusts very well, so my cardboards aren't sitting on 'wet' icing ... there is not really any moisture to be absorbed. And I stay and cut my cakes, so I see personally each and every cake I do.

As loriemoms asked ... are you using the cardboards designed to be used with cakes or are you ... as I've seen some poeple say they do .... making your own out of boxes 'n such (not such a food safe thing to do in my opinion).




I use a crusting buttercream icing. I also dusted under each cake with a generous amount of icing sugar. I just use the plain cardboard rounds that they sell at the cake shoppe. They are not wax covered. On occassion i have placed a peice of wax paper underneath the round so that removal would be easier, but still i have the cardboard round absorbing the oil..likely from the borders. I stacked the cakes the night before.
Should i cover the rounds with something? I've read of people experiencing slippage of cakes, so have always been hesitant to cover them.

suz

Junecakes Posted 20 Jul 2008 , 5:16pm
post #15 of 15

Just curious...where do you get the waxed covered boards? I can only find plain cardboard rounds at my local shop. TIA

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