Heating Core Help

Decorating By the cake whole Updated 17 Jul 2008 , 12:05pm by lillicakes

the cake whole Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 2:31pm
post #1 of 12

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I am going to be baking a large cake and will need to insert a "heating core." I have heard people using flower nails.... just one question where do you place the nail or nails and how and when do you remove them?

Thanks!

11 replies
leah_s Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 2:48pm
post #2 of 12

In 40+ years of baking I have never used a heating core or a flower nail. Just turn down your oven temp, and use the bake even strips. IMO, Wilton created the heating core just to sell you something else.

the cake whole Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 2:57pm
post #3 of 12

Since I am just starting out I have a silly question....what are the bake even strips? Are they a silver colour?

danijus Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 3:52pm
post #4 of 12

Yes, they are silver and you have to wet them and pin them around your pan. I didn't like them. I didn't like the flower nails either. I had better luck with the heating core. My cakes baked nice and even.

leah_s Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:43pm
post #5 of 12

I don't actually use the bake even strips, but a lot of people like them. I have them in my closet.

PinkZiab Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:55pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Quote:

IMO, Wilton created the heating core just to sell you something else.




I have to agree with this... i also do not use bake even strips. Like Leah said, just lower the temp, and you'll be fine.

fearlessbaker Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:58pm
post #7 of 12

I don't use anything anymore. I got so sick of all the fooling around with it that it just took the joy out of baking. Do what Chef Leah does. If the cake rises a little too much I just trim the top of it.

Tallmama Posted 16 Jul 2008 , 4:59pm
post #8 of 12

Bake at 325 you will have even cakes and your cake will be much more moist.

Cake_Princess Posted 17 Jul 2008 , 8:29am
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by danijus

Yes, they are silver and you have to wet them and pin them around your pan. I didn't like them. I didn't like the flower nails either. I had better luck with the heating core. My cakes baked nice and even.




I agree, I have not had any luck with the flower nail. I prefer the heating core much better.

Cake_Princess Posted 17 Jul 2008 , 8:31am
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

In 40+ years of baking I have never used a heating core or a flower nail.




You must have a perfectly calibrated oven. I lower my temps and I still get a hump.

leah_s Posted 17 Jul 2008 , 11:56am
post #11 of 12

I get a little hump but it's just no big deal. I either press a cookie sheet flat onto the top of the pan when I pull the cake out, eliminating the hump, or just cut it off.

lillicakes Posted 17 Jul 2008 , 12:05pm
post #12 of 12

I always use the strips (my first instructor recommended them and made an early convert of me). I have tried using nails for bigger layers but found them to be pretty useless-0-if they do anything at all, it isn't worth the diddling around with them. I am working on a cake with big layers (16 inch down) and used the heating cores for the first time. Wow, they really do make a difference. I am not that concerned about the hump--I have no problem with trimming (or smashing icon_smile.gif) buit I hate it when cake is actually cooked unevenly and is too done on the edges. The 16 at 325 with three cores (maybe overkill) turned out great.

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