Need Help On Buttermilk

Decorating By bobhope Updated 15 Jul 2008 , 3:48pm by bobhope

bobhope Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 6:00am
post #1 of 13

i have a few recipes i wanna try that calls for buttermilk.buttermilk is in liquid form, am i right?but what is available in our local groceries here are buttermilk in powder form. do i add water into it & how much? i hope someone out here can help me w/ this.would really appreciate it..thanks

bobbie icon_smile.gif

12 replies
momshobby Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 6:24am
post #2 of 13

You can google buttermilk substitutions. Generally with chocolate cakes, I have used plain milk with lemon or vinegar added to it. For coffee cakes, yoghurt, or sour cream works. But do google this, and get some ideas on substitutions that work. I have never seen powdered buttermilk, just fresh, beside the creams and milk in the grocery store.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 6:24am
post #3 of 13

Yes, buttermilk is liquid. Is the powder something you would reconstitute into a liquid normally? If so, I would just make up as directed and use it. You can also use the following as a buttermilk substitute - 1 cup milk with 1 tbsp milk removed, then add 1 tbsp lemon juice, stir and let it sit for a minute or two and use as directed. Hope that helps!

mclaren Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 7:08am
post #4 of 13

I've successfully baked scratch cakes using recipes that called for buttermilk, & never once I bought the real mc coy, but used the buttermilk substitute instead (1 cup on milk + 1 tbsp vinegar, let stand for 5-10 mins).
I did not reduce the milk by 1 tbsp or anything, just used the whole cup.

bfp Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 10:24am
post #5 of 13

I have used the powdered buttermilk. I just followed the directions on the box and maid up the amount I needed for the recipe. It is great for storage when you do not use butter milk very often. I have also used the buttermilk substitute that mclaren posted and this works really good too. I can not find fresh buttermilk in my area either and had to find other options. This is the fun part were you can experiment on new recipes and make them what you want. Have fun and good luck!

foxymomma521 Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 10:52am
post #6 of 13

I use the powdered all the time. Keep it in the fridge after you open it. My mix calls for 4T plus 1 cup water for every cup of buttermilk. You don't mix it together. Add the powdered milk with your dry ingredients and the water with your liquids. HTH icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 10:54am
post #7 of 13

I never buy buttermilk. Put 1 Tablespoon vinegar into a one cup measure, then fill with milk to the one cup mark. Let sit for a bit.

mgdsue02 Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 11:12am
post #8 of 13

I have used the powdered buttermilk and there are directions on the back. It is 4 Tbls. mix to 1 cup water. Add the powdered buttermilk to the dry ingredients and add the water with the wet. I have also just added vinegar to milk (or lemon juice). Hope this helps.

BakingJeannie Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 12:13pm
post #9 of 13

Powdered buttermilk is great because it does not expire like the one in the icebox. I just follow the directions on the side : 4 table spoon (add to dry ingredients) and 1 cup of water (add to batter alternate with dry ingredients).



saap1204 Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 12:50pm
post #10 of 13

What does buttermilk do to a recipe that regular milk, sour cream, etc. does not. I have been buying buttermilk for a certain recipe I make. I usually do the lemon juice/milk thing for most recipes. Just curious as to why some recipes call for buttermilk and others just call for milk. TIA.

staceyboots Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 2:45pm
post #11 of 13

interesting question, saap.

i would like to know the answer too!

PennySue Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 2:58pm
post #12 of 13

Just a thought here... I usually use buttermilk in Collett Peter's chocolate cake recipe. This last time I made it, I didn't have any so I used just plain whole milk instead. There was no identifiable difference in the texture or the rise in the cake at all and I thought it tasted even better than with the buttermilk. I let it cool for about five minutes out of the pan and then wrapped it in plastic wrap and foil and froze it while it was still steamy. Came out very moist and yummy.

bobhope Posted 15 Jul 2008 , 3:48pm
post #13 of 13

thank you all for your quick replies. i've actually googled buttermilk substitute before, but i came across this powdered buttermilk in the grocery, so i thought i'd give it a try. i just realized when i got home that there were no instructions at all icon_cry.gif... i know, weird huh! ..will just have to try both (powdered & substitute) & see which comes out better..again, thanks icon_biggrin.gif


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