This Must Seem Crazy To You Guys...

Decorating By mom2spunkynbug Updated 14 Jul 2008 , 10:46am by loriemoms

mom2spunkynbug Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 8:55pm
post #1 of 10

but I hardly EVER use a support system for my cakes!!

There is a lot of talk about SPS, SFS, Wilton dowels, etc...

Well, the very first stacked cake I made (about 9 years ago) was for my daughter's first birthday. I used a boxed mix & frosting from a can. If I can remember, I think I did a 6"-8"-10" one layer each. I just sat them all on top of each other - and it was fine!

I just did a 1st birthday cake this weekend - everything from scratch - 8"-10" cakes (it's in my photos) and I didn't use any supports. I've never had a problem with this - has anyone else never used supports and been fine?

I've tried the Wilton wooden dowels (for the 3-tiered stacked purple/pink cake in my photos) and they were SUCH A PAIN! I couldn't cut them all the exact same way!

Actually, on my first wedding cake 6"-9"-12" I used Wilton's plastic dowels in the 12" but I didn't use any in the 9" to hold the 6"! And it was fine!

What do you guys think of this???

9 replies
Iheartcake Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 9:13pm
post #2 of 10

Crazy... no.
Brave.. yes.


Before I took any cake courses or discovered this site, I did make one tiered cake without any supports. Had no idea a cake would even need any supports. It had to be driven about 20 minutes away and made it no problem.

Now that I know more about cakes and supporting them.. I would never take a chance and not use dowels. I get paranoid now even with dowels just because of some of the horror stories you hear about cakes collapsing, falling over, etc. I look at it like it's not worth taking the chance that a cake might collapse under its own weight. How awful would you feel after spending hours and hours on your masterpiece just to have it collapse due to lack of support? Not a risk I'd be willing to take, that's for sure!

tamivo Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 9:26pm
post #3 of 10

Hi there... Well I am right there with you... I don't ever support my 6" tiers and I make a gazillion of them... I do support anything larger than that though.

mom2spunkynbug Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 9:42pm
post #4 of 10

I just don't get how a cake would collapse.

When I was doing the 1st birthday cake this last weekend, I actually put a cardboard circle on top of the (uniced) 10" cake and put some weight on it with my hands - know what I mean? I pushed down pretty hard and the cake was mighty stable! I couldn't see it just collapsing.

Do you think that cakes from scratch are sturdier?

ziggytarheel Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 10:18pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2spunkynbug

I just don't get how a cake would collapse.

When I was doing the 1st birthday cake this last weekend, I actually put a cardboard circle on top of the (uniced) 10" cake and put some weight on it with my hands - know what I mean? I pushed down pretty hard and the cake was mighty stable! I couldn't see it just collapsing.

Do you think that cakes from scratch are sturdier?




Well, look at it this way....

If you put your TV on the cake, would it collapse?

What about a printer?

A dictionary?

At some point, any cake will collapse. So, what is that magic point for your cake? And how much risk do you want to take?

mom2spunkynbug Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 10:36pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggytarheel



Well, look at it this way....

If you put your TV on the cake, would it collapse?

What about a printer?

A dictionary?




Um, yeah LOL I think my TV is a bit heavier than my 6" cake that I placed on top

Quote:
Quote:


So, what is that magic point for your cake? And how much risk do you want to take?




I see your point though.

Edit Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 1:46am
post #7 of 10

It also depends on the type of cake you bake (some are sturdier than others), also how tall your cakes are (one 2" layer won't make it too heavy but a 4" high with some heavy filling might turn out too heavy.
There was a post a couple days ago, showing an unsupported castle cake from a bakery that sunk and slid quite a bit.
I wouldn't like to be in place of the person who made that cake.

Housemouse Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 9:52am
post #8 of 10

I've done two tier cakes without using supports and transported them 157 miles. But I'm not boasting about that!

I think I was lucky and now i think v carefully about the cake in terms of its durability before I do this.

I make my cakes from scratch, I use a higher density recipe and I'd rather have three layers of thinner butter cream or preserve rather than one deeper layer.

But that is just me. From reading your recipes and posts it seems that the texture of a lot of American style cakes is lighter, fluffier, and much moister and your fillings might be more moussier, more exotic, deeper, etc, etc and so all in all more susceptible to movement of the horizontal and the plain old falling over kind!

I'm looking forward to teh days in the UK when we return to good old fruit cake and royal icing!

MikeRowesHunny Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 10:13am
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Housemouse


I'm looking forward to teh days in the UK when we return to good old fruit cake and royal icing!




LOL! Yeah, nothing is collapsing those babies!

loriemoms Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 10:46am
post #10 of 10

I have some 6 inch cakes that weigh a LOT! Between the cake being dense, the filling being heavy, fondant, a topper and gum paste flowers, even a 6 inch cake can weigh as much as your TV! (well, almost)

Not using dowels or any kind of support system to me is playing russian roulette. I could never risk that. I even dowel my cakes when I put a teddy bear cake on top of a round cake, etc.

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