Simple Fondant Questions.. Just Looking For Advice.

Decorating By dennishaskins Updated 14 Jul 2008 , 4:37pm by sugarshack

dennishaskins Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 1:26pm
post #1 of 10

hey, i was just wondering if anyone could give me some tips on laying fondant! i guess my main questions would be, i've heard of some people chilling the iced cake before laying the fondant to get sharper edges. is that a good idea? dont the corners just drop after the cake comes to room temp? i've also heard that using more buttercream than you think will help you achieve sharper edges? is that true? and lastly, should i be using a thick layer of fondant? i've always kept it pretty thin because alot of people i talk to dont care for the taste of it so i tend to lay it on pretty thin? i've never had AMAZING fondant skills so i'm just looking for ways to tighten it up.

thanks!

9 replies
sari66 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 7:00pm
post #2 of 10

Hi there, chilling the cake is done after you crumb coat it in butter cream then it's taken out to come to room temp so that the butter cream is tacky and the fondant sticks to the cake...does this make it look sharper? YES will the edges fall nope not if it's applied right.... don't use more butter cream as this can cause the fondant to buldge and slip off!
Keep your fondant rolled thin 1/4'' or less is better!

hth

mjs4492 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 7:09pm
post #3 of 10

I don't chill cakes before applying fondant and it works for me. I guess everyone has a way of doing it though. I use a thinner layer of buttercream than I would normally under fondant.

For edges you can just work with the smoothers until you get it how you like it. The smoother the cake surface and the sharper the edges prior to applying the fondant will help you also.

Good luck and experiment!! thumbs_up.gif

miasuzzette Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 7:12pm
post #4 of 10

icon_eek.gif How would you go about measuring the Fondant. That it would measure 1/4, How do you go about it. I'm still learning icon_biggrin.gif Thank You thumbs_up.gif

Margie from CT

mjs4492 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 7:51pm
post #5 of 10

You can either eyeball it for thickness or mark something, a skewer for example, at 1/4" and stick in the center or randomly on the fondant surface. But then you would have to smooth the marks out or cover with a decoration once on the cake.

sari66 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 10:33pm
post #6 of 10

I can feel the thickness but if you can't do that yet there are sizing rings that you put on the rolling pin to get an even thickness.

hth

KathyAM Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 12:35am
post #7 of 10

So it is better to roll it thin? I cannot seem to get the fondant so that it is smooth at the bottom edge - I always get puckers down there. What is the best way to get a smooth bottom edge? I read that you should make the fondant smaller than you need so that you can stretch it down. I tried this but I still had puckers.

Cake_Princess Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 6:33am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathyAM

So it is better to roll it thin? I cannot seem to get the fondant so that it is smooth at the bottom edge - I always get puckers down there. What is the best way to get a smooth bottom edge? I read that you should make the fondant smaller than you need so that you can stretch it down. I tried this but I still had puckers.




I definitely do not advocate cutting smaller and stretching. To me that's just going to give you more wrinkles.

When I put fondant on a cake. I hold the fondant with my non-dominant hand to support it. Simply put a hand under the fondant so it's on the surface that will come in contact with the cake. Just let it rest there gently.

With my dominant hand, I cup slightly and gently smoothed the fondant down onto the cake. Remember if you are working with corners, smooth them out first.

If you have never taken a cake decorating class try Wilton's Course 3. This way you can get some hands on help.

jess85 Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 11:32am
post #9 of 10

a cake smoother will make your life easier, you use the edge to smooth it at the bottom and then trim away the excess.

sugarshack Posted 14 Jul 2008 , 4:37pm
post #10 of 10

i crumbcoat my cakes

chill

fondant about 1/4 inch thick or a tad thinner

thinner the fondnat; the harder it will be to get a smooth look.

the larger you roll your circle out, the easier it will be to work out the pleats and folds

HTH!

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