List Of Frosting/icing Types W How Long They Last?

Decorating By lizamlin Updated 13 Jul 2008 , 5:34pm by Texas_Rose

lizamlin Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 7:14pm
post #1 of 15

I am trying to compile my own 'dummy, here's how to bake' binder (I''m the dummy, btw lol) and I'd like to know if anyone has a list or spreadsheet of frostings and icings and how long they keep -- and whether to store at room temp or in fridge. Hope to hear...
Thanks!

14 replies
SeriousCakes Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 1:53am
post #2 of 15

Here's a webpage that really helped me!
http://www.baking911.com/decorating/cakes_buttercream.htm
This is how I found out that I didn't need to put my frosted cakes in the fridge icon_biggrin.gif

lizamlin Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 9:38am
post #3 of 15

Serious_Cakes -- I tried the link and it didn't work icon_cry.gif could you please try listing it again ? Thank you!!

Shola Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 10:11am
post #4 of 15

Bump!
Had some IMBC in the fridge for about 2 weeks, seems ok but I'd like to know the shelf life? icon_smile.gif

SDL79 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 11:01am
post #5 of 15

I found a listing of this in one of my Wilton decorating books. Probably didn't cover everything, but definately helped me out quite a bit as far as knowing a little bit more about some of the icings as well!

Mike1394 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 11:11am
post #6 of 15

Anything left in the fridge after a week toss. If you plan on keeping for over that freeze it.

As far as a list of frostings. There are numerous frostings, then there are variations of those. the list is endless. Can you be more specific, or do a search on CC, and grab some printer paper

Mike

SeriousCakes Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 12:57pm
post #7 of 15

This is weird, it won't let me link the page! It's from baking 911 but everytime I try to post it the baking 911 part disappears from the web address icon_cry.gif
Anyway, here's what she says about regular buttercream:
Question: Why doesn't buttercream made with butter, powdered sugar and a small amount of milk need refrigeration?
Answer: Because of its high content of sugar and fat. Micro-organisms need water to grow. When the sugar content is so high, the sugar binds the water in such a way that micro-organisms cannot utilize it. Technically its called "water activity control"

I personally will leave my cakes at room temp without any problems, even though I use cream in my frosting. icon_biggrin.gif

About meringues:
Cooked meringue can be refrigerated for several days or frozen for 6 months. Therefore, it can stay out of refrigeration for 2 hours on the cool side of room temperature. If you do, be sure to allow the buttercream to come to room temperature, then whip it with an electric mixer on medium speed until it is once again thick, smooth, and shiny and returns to its original volume

Mike1394 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 1:27pm
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious_Cakes

This is weird, it won't let me link the page! It's from but everytime I try to post it the part disappears from the web address icon_cry.gif
Anyway, here's what she says about regular buttercream:
Question: Why doesn't buttercream made with butter, powdered sugar and a small amount of milk need refrigeration?
Answer: Because of its high content of sugar and fat. Micro-organisms need water to grow. When the sugar content is so high, the sugar binds the water in such a way that micro-organisms cannot utilize it. Technically its called "water activity control"

I personally will leave my cakes at room temp without any problems, even though I use cream in my frosting. icon_biggrin.gif

About meringues:
Cooked meringue can be refrigerated for several days or frozen for 6 months. Therefore, it can stay out of refrigeration for 2 hours on the cool side of room temperature. If you do, be sure to allow the buttercream to come to room temperature, then whip it with an electric mixer on medium speed until it is once again thick, smooth, and shiny and returns to its original volume




Bacteria needs moisture, food, and an ambient temp to grow. According to the '05 food code that temp is 41-135. Can someone post some kind of data that sugar is a preservative? Salt has been used through the years as one, but not sugar. I could be wrong, but I don't see how sugar will preserve.

Mike

playingwithsugar Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 1:40pm
post #9 of 15

Mike,

There are several articles on the Net which convey the theory that sugar can act as a preservative. Most of them require a college degree to understand. Some of them even diagram the sugar molecule.

I used the phrase "sugar as a preservative" in AltaVista.

Instead, I am including this article from www.jelly.org which simplifies the explanation, so we can all understand it.

http://www.jelly.org/myths.html

You will find the answer you seek in paragraph 3, under the title "Why Sugar Is Used In Making Jellys, Jams, and Preserves."

On the other hand, if you do your own research, and find evidence to the contrary, I will be more than happy to read what you have found.

It is my belief that we are all entitled to express opinions here, as long as they are backed up with facts.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

BakingGirl Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 2:14pm
post #10 of 15

Try this link, taking out all the stars.

http://www.*baking*911*.com*/decorating/icing_glaze_choices.htm

SeriousCakes Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 2:25pm
post #11 of 15

lol-thank you bakinggirl! I thought I was going crazy, I edited my message 3 times trying to get it to post!
My husband brought up this point about sugar as a preservative, 'How many times have you seen a lollipop get moldy?' And what about caramel that uses both milk and sugar? It's the high amount of sugar that binds the water.

Mike1394 Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 2:46pm
post #12 of 15

Theresa,
Why does jelly go bad, get furries growing, in the fridge after a lil bit. With jams, jelly. I can see it. My thinking is all that changes when you introduce a fat, and a protien to it. Then with sugar being hygroscopic, that would give the fat, and the protien moisture it needs.

The reason I'm asking is I don't know.

Mike

Texas_Rose Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 3:59pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Theresa,
Why does jelly go bad, get furries growing, in the fridge after a lil bit. With jams, jelly. I can see it. My thinking is all that changes when you introduce a fat, and a protien to it. Then with sugar being hygroscopic, that would give the fat, and the protien moisture it needs.

The reason I'm asking is I don't know.

Mike




I know one reason jelly will grow furries...because someone in the house licks the knife and then sticks it back in the jar for more...the jelly equivalent of a double-dipper.

all4cake Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 4:15pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Theresa,
Why does jelly go bad, get furries growing, in the fridge after a lil bit. With jams, jelly. I can see it. My thinking is all that changes when you introduce a fat, and a protien to it. Then with sugar being hygroscopic, that would give the fat, and the protien moisture it needs.

The reason I'm asking is I don't know.

Mike



I know one reason jelly will grow furries...because someone in the house licks the knife and then sticks it back in the jar for more...the jelly equivalent of a double-dipper.




Or someone introduced something else foreign into the jar...ie, peanut butter, margarine, butter. I would just hate to think someone licks the spoon or knife and uses it again.

Texas_Rose Posted 13 Jul 2008 , 5:34pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

Theresa,
Why does jelly go bad, get furries growing, in the fridge after a lil bit. With jams, jelly. I can see it. My thinking is all that changes when you introduce a fat, and a protien to it. Then with sugar being hygroscopic, that would give the fat, and the protien moisture it needs.

The reason I'm asking is I don't know.

Mike



I know one reason jelly will grow furries...because someone in the house licks the knife and then sticks it back in the jar for more...the jelly equivalent of a double-dipper.



Or someone introduced something else foreign into the jar...ie, peanut butter, margarine, butter. I would just hate to think someone licks the spoon or knife and uses it again.




Got kids? icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gif I bought dozens of little plastic knives for them to use (I should buy stock in Ikea) and they still do it. The best solution is the squirt bottle jelly, but we like the weird flavors like apricot and pineapple, so that doesn't work.

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