How Do I Transport A 4 Tier Wedding Cake

Decorating By bsan Updated 12 Jul 2008 , 8:40pm by SweetConfectionsChef

bsan Posted 11 Jul 2008 , 8:59pm
post #1 of 13

Hi, my friend and I are making our first wedding cake. It will be 4 tier (stacked) bottom cake 16", then 12", 10", and 8". We are using plates to separate the cakes with pillars(not dowels) to support the plates.

How would you suggest transporting this? We are debating over transporting it with the 16"/12" stacked and the 10"/8" stacked and then putting those two parts together on site. What do you suggest?

12 replies
alracntna Posted 11 Jul 2008 , 9:34pm
post #2 of 13

i am not quite sure if i am getting the whole picture from you but this is what i do for wedding cakes. first even if the tiers are separated with pillars you still have to put support dowels in the bottom cake to hold up the plate the pillars are on. then if each cake is separated with pillars then you can take them all apart and take them as single cakes to where they are going and assemble them there. if two are stacked and then pillars and the other two are stacked then just separate the two halves and take them as two cakes and then put them together there. i hope i have helped i am not even sure i didn't confuse myself...lol good luck and don't worry yall will do fine!

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 2:17am
post #3 of 13

icon_confused.gif Are you stacking the cake or using pillars in between the cakes? icon_confused.gif

indydebi Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 3:43am
post #4 of 13

If you are using hidden or push-in pillars, I'd transport it in 4 pieces and just assemble it there.

bsan Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 3:57am
post #5 of 13

Yes, I am using hidden support pillars. The final product will be a 4-tier cake stacked - each layer stacked directly on top of the other.
Have any of you done this? Is it easiest just to assemble there and pipe on the boarder at the wedding?
Thanks for your suggestions thus far.

AmyCakes2 Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 4:22am
post #6 of 13

I always take my cake in pieces and put it all together there. It just gives me piece of mind that if I go around a turn to fast, I don't topple a cake!
Just make sure you have plenty of support under your bottom tiers.
Good luck!

pieceofcake2000 Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 4:26am
post #7 of 13

For a fake cake I assemble at home so I have a quick drop off. They weigh next to nothing so you don't worry about them falling over.

Real cake is a different story I always take in pieces and assemble at the reception hall. Ribbon, toppers, some side decorations, borders, etc go on after it is put together. Just be sure to give yourself enough time (up to an hour) after you get there to work. make a list of tools you will need to take along including extra dowels, pins, tips, plenty of extra frosting in case of a boo-boo. Don't forget the camera and extra batteries. Gotta get a picture of the finished product!

Good luck!

Cynita Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 4:30am
post #8 of 13

What ever you do, do not stack 4 cakes on top of one another without proper support. Dowels rods, support pillars, whatever you use just be sure to put them in each cake that has a cake sitting on top of it. I would stack the 16 and 12, then the other two, the 10 and 8 and then assemble them at the hall. If you have it properly supported and a spacious vehicle and drive extremely careful you can probably transport them all stacked. I have. It arrived perfect. That's the 4 tier lavender wedding cake in my photos.

Cynita

Cynita

indydebi Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 11:17am
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsan

Yes, I am using hidden support pillars. The final product will be a 4-tier cake stacked - each layer stacked directly on top of the other.
Have any of you done this? Is it easiest just to assemble there and pipe on the boarder at the wedding?
Thanks for your suggestions thus far.




Yes ... do it all the time. I can be in and out in about 15 minutes.

loriemoms Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 2:36pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsan

Hi, my friend and I are making our first wedding cake. It will be 4 tier (stacked) bottom cake 16", then 12", 10", and 8". We are using plates to separate the cakes with pillars(not dowels) to support the plates.

How would you suggest transporting this? We are debating over transporting it with the 16"/12" stacked and the 10"/8" stacked and then putting those two parts together on site. What do you suggest?




If you have a good board the cake is sitting on and use interlocking dowels and plates, like SPS, etc, you should have no problems. I transport 4 tiered cakes all the time with SPS. It is very solid. I cannot stress how important you have the base board it is sitting on strong enough. One cake drum isn't enough, use two or even three if you have heavy decorations.
Make sure the cake is on a nice flat surface in the vehicle (I use eggcrate) and is secured in a box so it won't topple over if it is tall.

I would never attempt to do this with a doweled system or even with dowells and center support dowell. I have heard too many stories of everything shifting.

bsan Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 5:43pm
post #11 of 13

Wow! So many suggestions. WE are using the interlocking plates and support pillars (not dowels). We have a very solid board base (melamine). I am thinking that we'll take it 2 pieces. This way we'll only need to put 2 parts together rather than 4. Thank you so much for you advice. I'll post a picture of the final product!
Cynthia - your 4 tier is beautiful.

leah_s Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 5:57pm
post #12 of 13

I'd take the bottom 2 or 3 already stacked (whatever you can lift) and put the top on onsite. I only do that so that I can check for level one last time. Then border that last one. But of course, ONLY do this with SPS, not dowels.

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 12 Jul 2008 , 8:40pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsan

Yes, I am using hidden support pillars. The final product will be a 4-tier cake stacked - each layer stacked directly on top of the other.
Have any of you done this? Is it easiest just to assemble there and pipe on the boarder at the wedding?
Thanks for your suggestions thus far.




Okay, gottcha! I guess I was confused...preggo brain for sure! LOL Anyway, I use dowels but I deliver all cakes completely assembled and have never had an issue. The hidden pillars work the same way! Some don't feel comfortable for whatever reason carrying a completely assembled cake so you have to do what you feel is right for you!

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