A Tip Involving Measuring Shortening

Decorating By tuffstuff Updated 8 Sep 2008 , 2:10pm by Lindakbh

tuffstuff Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 6:46pm
post #1 of 27

I recently came to a realization that I wish had happened long ago. I already have a food scale for my weight watchers stuff but I never thought to use it for measuring ingredients for cakes until my last baking session.
I don't use it for all the ingredients - so far just for shortening, sour cream and powdered sugar. Shortening and sour cream were especially annoying to measure with measuring cups so I figured out how much a cup weighs in grams and divide or multiply from there. Soooo much easier. I love how you can just plop the stuff right into your other ingredients by just zeroing it out. thumbs_up.gif

26 replies
-K8memphis Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 6:57pm
post #2 of 27

Another way to measure shortening is to do it in water. Like fill a four cup measure to the 2 cup level and then plop the shortening in until the water reaches the three cup mark--or whatever. Pour out the water and wa la.

I like to weigh some stuff too. Good call.


I use a postage scale.

edited to say the better idea for me is to use my scale to weigh the food I eat like you do!!!

tonedna Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 27

I use the scale too...is the easiest way

BakingGirl Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 7:20pm
post #4 of 27

I love this type of measuring cup for things like butter and shortening.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00024WN3Q/?tag=cakecentral-20

DoniB Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 7:46pm
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingGirl

I love this type of measuring cup for things like butter and shortening.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00024WN3Q/?tag=cakecentral-20




That looks a lot like the Measure All cup that Pampered Chef makes, and it's the ONLY one I use for shortening, peanut butter... anything that's normally hard to get out of a regular cup or leaves behind a real mess. I love my measure all! icon_smile.gif If you have a Pampered Chef person you know or are going to a party any time soon, I highly recommend this! icon_smile.gif

Lindakbh Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 7:59pm
post #6 of 27

I weigh just about anything that I need more than a tablespoon of now, too- flour, sugar, liquids, fats. It saves time and a lot of clean-up, and is also more accurate, since ingredients can vary in volume.

With my scale, I can set the mixer bowl on it, hit âresetâ and it sets the display to zero. I then add the ingredient until it is the right amount then hit reset and put in the next ingredient, etc. You do have to be careful not to go over, though, like with liquids.

I love it and have converted most of my recipes to weights.

MessiET Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 10:39pm
post #7 of 27

I also use a Wonder Cup (Measure All) to measure shortening. It works wonderfully!! I would recommend it.

Mike1394 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 10:50pm
post #8 of 27

WoooHooo Congrats. Welcome to the darkside. icon_biggrin.gif

Mike

MessiET Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:07pm
post #9 of 27

Huh??? icon_confused.gif

doughdough Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:13pm
post #10 of 27

I use either method (scale or Measure All)...it just depends on how lazy I am or how full the dishwasher is icon_smile.gif

I used to just buy the Crisco pre-measured sticks, but now that I'm converted to high-ratio I have to measure it!

Mike1394 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:19pm
post #11 of 27

99% of all American recipes use cups to measure with. One of the most important ingred. in baking is flour. Go to your flour bin, and measure out 5 even cups of flour. Weigh each one. Tomorrow do the same thing. The # will be different. One cup of sifted flour is less (in weight) than one cup of non-sifted flour. We wonder why hardly anyone can find a good scratch cake recipe. It's because our scaling isn't consistant. One of the dumbest things is Brown sugar. Tightly packed one cup. WTH is that. I can pretty much gaurentee I can pack B. Sugar more tightly than most.

So since we keep doing this, weighing out ingredients has to be close to the darkside of things. icon_biggrin.gif

Mike

PattyLen Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 1:38am
post #12 of 27

The easiest way for me to dig that cup of crisco out of the huge container is to use an ice cream scoop. One scoop equals 1/4 cup, four quick scoops and I'm done.

icon_biggrin.gif

tuffstuff Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 5:07am
post #13 of 27

Great tips you guys have been sharing for those that don't have a scale icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 5:23am
post #14 of 27

Another Crisco tip I have read on here is to line your measuring cup with plastic wrap. When you are down throw out the plastic wrap and you don't have the mess in the cup.

I like the ice cream scoop idea as well.

armywifebryan Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 1:08pm
post #15 of 27

Can I actually use my postal scale??? I have one stashed down in the basement and never thought to use it for baking! I HATE measuring everything out. I think it would be soooo much easier to weigh!!! Thanks guys for the tips! They are awesome. Keep em comin!!

Teresa

Mike1394 Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 1:11pm
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by armywifebryan

Can I actually use my postal scale??? I have one stashed down in the basement and never thought to use it for baking! I HATE measuring everything out. I think it would be soooo much easier to weigh!!! Thanks guys for the tips! They are awesome. Keep em comin!!

Teresa




I think postal scales are easier. Like when I make bread. I have the bowl, flour, yeast, honey. All of that comes to almost 7#s. A regular kitchen scale won't handle the weight.

Mike

KASCARLETT Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 1:18pm
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

Another Crisco tip I have read on here is to line your measuring cup with plastic wrap. When you are down throw out the plastic wrap and you don't have the mess in the cup.




WOW! That is an AWESOME idea! Even using the Measure All cup from Pampered Chef, it still gets a greasy film on the inside - I LOVE the idea of lining with plastic wrap and will use that the next time! That will make life so much easier!!

debster Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 1:51pm
post #18 of 27

Who would of thought an ice cream scoop............................ icon_surprised.gif Thanks

junny629 Posted 5 Sep 2008 , 9:16pm
post #19 of 27

Oohhh, I am going to buy me a scale and save me some time from measuring cups of shortening. So how much does a cup of shortening weigh?

debster Posted 6 Sep 2008 , 12:21pm
post #20 of 27

In the USA a cup = 8ozs or 1/2 pint Hope this helps!!!

sweetcravings Posted 6 Sep 2008 , 12:34pm
post #21 of 27

Yup..i measure my powdered sugar, crisco..etc.. by scale now. It's so much easier.
I was trying to figure out costs and needed the scale to figure it out. i will never go back. I use to dread measuring shortening, now it's so easy.

alanahodgson Posted 7 Sep 2008 , 2:54pm
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by debster

In the USA a cup = 8ozs or 1/2 pint Hope this helps!!!




8 fl. oz. and 8 oz. by weight are NOT the same. A cup of shortening and a cup of flour do not weigh the same, and neither weighs 8 oz.


Mike, my kitchen scale only goes up to 5 lbs, but if I "tare" or "reset" the weight for each ingredient, it will surely measure each one up to 5 lbs. so if I add 3 lbs of flour, hit "tare" and add 2 lbs butter, hit tare and add 1 lb. sugar, it will handle each of the ingredients just fine.

chutzpah Posted 7 Sep 2008 , 2:56pm
post #23 of 27

I've been weighing everything for years. It's the only really accurate way to get consistent resultats every time.

It should be quite obvious to everyone that a cup doesn't always weigh 8 ounces. I mean, does a cup of feathers weigh the same as a cup of lead shot? Duh.

lainalee Posted 7 Sep 2008 , 6:07pm
post #24 of 27

Great info, but for those of us (me) that are math illiterit icon_confused.gif (maybe spelling too) how do you convert to weight. Is there a reliable chart. Also, for those that already have one, what type of scale is best. I don't have one yet, so what would you all recomend?

armywifebryan Posted 7 Sep 2008 , 7:22pm
post #25 of 27

I got mine on ebay. It goes up to 35 pounds (I used it mainly for postage purposes until I found out I could use it for my baking, too!) I only paid around $30 for it. I just recently started using it for my ingredients and will never go back when it comes to measuring stuff like shortening!

Teresa

absijails Posted 7 Sep 2008 , 7:38pm
post #26 of 27

Is there a good resource for accurate conversions from the cup measurement to weight? I've seen a couple charts that have been found on-line and they aren't necessarily the same weights/cup for the same ingredient... Or, those of you who do weigh, have you just weighed out the measurements and made you're own charts?

Lindakbh Posted 8 Sep 2008 , 2:10pm
post #27 of 27

I have a chart that came with my scale. For vegetable shortening it shows that one cup is equal to 7 ounces.

The scaleâs brand is Salter and I highly recommend it, though it is a bit pricey. I believe my DH got it at Williams Sonoma (it was a gift). The Cake Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum also has weight equivalent charts for common cake ingredients and all of her recipes show volume and weight amounts in both grams and ounces.

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