Need To Make Sugar 'crystal Beads' For A Ronbenisrael Design

Decorating By sugarplum1635 Updated 8 Jul 2008 , 4:34pm by sugarplum1635

sugarplum1635 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 7:03am
post #1 of 27

Has anyone ever made edible crystal beads??
A bride brought me a photo of a Ron Ben Israel cake with these crystals on it and wants me to recreate it - using the design/pattern of the real crystals on her wedding gown. The info on the photo says they are "clear, molded sugar crystals."
I've made many a cake in my 30 years, but have not ever had a request like this before. I'm always up for a challenge, and want to do this, but need some input here.
The cake will be covered with chocolate fondant. The crystals will be clear and embellished with some purple and green crystals. (The colors of her wedding!) These will be applied in bands around each of the tiers. With the bottom tier to have the band and also some crystal garlands above it. She wants this cake to REALLY sparkle!!
Any thoughts/advice or links to an expert in this technique??
Thanks in advance........Jo

26 replies
ngfcake Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:09am
post #2 of 27

As far as I know they are made with isomalt. Check this link
https://www.fancyflours.com/jumbo-diamond-cake-jewels.html

sugarplum1635 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 1:51pm
post #3 of 27

Thanks for the link NGFCakes, they are very expensive to purchase.
I will have to look for the Isomalt and then get instructions for using it to make the crystals myself.
Going to need many many of them to go around 5 tiers! WOW!
Jo

-K8memphis Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 2:03pm
post #4 of 27

I am not a sugar guru by any means but I have tried to make sugar crystals as a non-essential component of a project. icon_lol.gificon_eek.gif I mean I used sugar too so isomalt I'm sure is a better idea--easier to handle maybe. But there's a certain point at which it goes from clear to start carmelizing and it was not easy for me to catch it hot enough but before it turned colors. Maybe I needed a better thermometer. I mean I just have dabbled with it.

Also the ones I did make stuck like glue in the jewel mold. I mean I've made some successful stuff too. I'm just saying I've used the silicone jewel mold and the white plastic one and getting the right amounts of that molten lava poured into those little bitty cavities was a challenge.

I mean I don't even have a heat lamp or anything--just used the oven so my work has been rudimentary at best but there it is.

The stick factor will be a challenge. I mean obviously you can't make these last minute. You gotta time it so they don't cloud from from age or get too sticky to handle and charge for this like you're gonna finally gonna get the deed to that condo in Cancun!!!

ngfcake Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 3:11pm
post #5 of 27

Maybe you could PM Sugarcreations, check this previous discussion http://forum.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=9570&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0
I hope this helps.

sugarplum1635 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 3:13pm
post #6 of 27

Thanks K8,
Appreciate the info.
Where did you find the different molds you mentioned? Are they readily available online, or from a particular vendor??
Would like to find them as I will have to factor in the cost of these and also the Isomalt itself into my price for the cake.
Bride wants this cake to Really sparkle. THese crystal-covered bands will be on chocolate fondant and should show up well.
Again thanks for any help you have to offer.
Be blessed!
Joanne

bittersweet Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 3:29pm
post #7 of 27

Go to cakesbysam.com she sells a new mold for making gems.[/i]

-K8memphis Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 3:33pm
post #8 of 27

Readily available. If you don't locate them I'll help. If I could remember now I'd tell you. Prolly two different places.

Despite the cost, I totally recommend purchasing them and charging her double that price for the additional labor of all the placement and handling.

The learning curve is quite steep. I mean if you could get with someone who can already do it and have them show you first hand. Ok notice how the big boys of pastry make large things out of this medium?

Maybe if you work and work the sugar in your hanies and then press it into the mold--maybe that would work. But I'm not sure you can keep it clear you prolly can--it might go cloudy--agh ... but do you really wanna knead each crystal? I mean you need an assistant or something to pull this off. You totally need an expert to hold your hand for a while. I mean I would.

I mean just the cost of the equipment you will need is not minimal. You gotta have a light set up. And who knows what all else.

Hey sparkle don't come cheap huh.

Remember the rhinestones that used to be used with the lace points?? And carefully counted and...hopefully nobody ate?! crunch crunch icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

There's a good reason you don't see this sugar crystal thing used often. Ron Ben-Israel? Can you say 'lots of extra hands?'

Hey here's a way to play that I love to do myself.


https://lorannoils.com/c-7-gourmet-recipes.aspx

I like to do the icicle one. I mean not that you haven't maybe done some sugar work I'm just saying this is where you can put your toe in the water. And start scoping out the kaching kaching.

But be careful with the pyrex and the molten lava--dangerous stuff!!

jen1977 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 3:48pm
post #9 of 27

Since you said they are put on the cake in bands, could you get brown ribbon the same color as the chocolate fondant, and apply real crystals or rhinestones to the ribbon, then attache that to the cake? I 've also seen strands of crystals. These would need to be taken off before being served, but may be an easier option than making sugar ones...especially if you've never worked with it before.

BrandisBaked Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:18pm
post #10 of 27

I was thinking about this last night...

I was going through bridal magazines and wanted to do up a dummy that recreated a gorgeous dress I saw. But I'd need to make rhinestones.

I have an idea that doesn't involve hot sugar (which I don't want to work with for tiny rhinestones - as it sets up too quickly and the risk of getting burned isn't that appealing)... and I plan to try it out this weekend. If it works, I'll post the info.

I imagine if it does work, they will be more like cabochons than faceted diamonds, but you'd still get the same shiny, effect.

bobwonderbuns Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:23pm
post #12 of 27

Okay, I'm speaking off the top of my head here, thinking aloud (having never done this before), but what about a variation of rock candy? That's not too difficult to make and it could conceivably be poured into molds... What do you think?

PattyT Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:24pm
post #13 of 27

I just followed k8memphis's loran oils link. They even have hard candy mixes to make it easier. No jewel molds though they show jewel shapes in their pictures.

I've seen jewel molds in the craft/clay section of the big craft stores, but not sure about food safe or - more importantly - the hot sugar mixture.

lorijom Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:35pm
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobwonderbuns

Okay, I'm speaking off the top of my head here, thinking aloud (having never done this before), but what about a variation of rock candy? That's not too difficult to make and it could conceivably be poured into molds... What do you think?




Excellent idea!! You really wouldn't need the molds because the rock candy forms into crystals...if I remember from my high school days there is a way to change the mixture based on what size crystals you want to form. It seems to me that the crystals form without bubbles in them and come out pretty clear. If it was me this is what I would try...actually I think I will try it icon_smile.gif

bobwonderbuns Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:38pm
post #15 of 27

Cool!! Take lots of notes and give us progress reports -- I love learning vicariously! icon_lol.gif

lorijom Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 4:49pm
post #16 of 27

heading to the kitchen with my mad scientist hat on...

ibmoser Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:38pm
post #17 of 27

First Impression molds sells jewel molds in large and small sizes. I tried the small ones with a regular hard candy-type recipe, and they were difficult at best. They yellowed before I could get the thick syrup into the small cavities. I needed "diamonds", not yellow topaz. In one of the classes I took from Nicholas Lodge, he talked about crushing Jolly Rancher candies, mounding them into the molds mentioned above, and putting them in the oven on a lowish heat until they melted. I looked for those very pale blue hard mints to try for my diamonds but could never find them. Might work if you can find a clear hard candy somewhere.

Jenn2179 Posted 5 Jul 2008 , 11:57pm
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibmoser

First Impression molds sells jewel molds in large and small sizes. I tried the small ones with a regular hard candy-type recipe, and they were difficult at best. They yellowed before I could get the thick syrup into the small cavities. I needed "diamonds", not yellow topaz. In one of the classes I took from Nicholas Lodge, he talked about crushing Jolly Rancher candies, mounding them into the molds mentioned above, and putting them in the oven on a lowish heat until they melted. I looked for those very pale blue hard mints to try for my diamonds but could never find them. Might work if you can find a clear hard candy somewhere.




Oh that's a great idea. They do stuff like that to make windows in gingerbread houses.

-K8memphis Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 12:19am
post #19 of 27

Great great idea! Jolly Ranchers prolly has a clear one.

evansjune Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 12:31am
post #20 of 27

I wish I could help but I have no clue. Hopefully you find something that will work for you. Good Luck!

bethola Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 12:46am
post #21 of 27

Hobby Lobby and some Walmarts carry the jewel molds. I just sprayed mine with PAM and had no problem. I use Isomalt. It has a nice clear look and you don't have to use water with it! You just melt the Isomalt itself! GREAT! Expensive, but, GREAT to use.

GOOD LUCK!

Beth in KY

Jenn2179 Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 12:49am
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bethola

Hobby Lobby and some Walmarts carry the jewel molds. I just sprayed mine with PAM and had no problem. I use Isomalt. It has a nice clear look and you don't have to use water with it! You just melt the Isomalt itself! GREAT! Expensive, but, GREAT to use.

GOOD LUCK!

Beth in KY




I have isomalt that I have yet to use. Can you tell me the recipe you use for it? The water to isomalt ratio and cooking temperature.

TIA.

bethola Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 1:08am
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenn2179

Quote:
Originally Posted by bethola

Hobby Lobby and some Walmarts carry the jewel molds. I just sprayed mine with PAM and had no problem. I use Isomalt. It has a nice clear look and you don't have to use water with it! You just melt the Isomalt itself! GREAT! Expensive, but, GREAT to use.

GOOD LUCK!

Beth in KY



I have isomalt that I have yet to use. Can you tell me the recipe you use for it? The water to isomalt ratio and cooking temperature.

TIA.




Sure, no problem.

IF you want to use water it's 4 parts Isomalt to 1 part distilled water. Bring to a boil until 340 degrees. Then remove from heat and shock the bottom of the pan with cold water. Allow to cool just a bit and then pour in molds or make spun sugar, or "pulled" sugar.

If you don't want to use water just put the Isomalt in a pan and allow to melt over med. heat. Bring to a boil until 380 degrees. Remove from heat and proceed as above.

You don't want to let it cool too much, but, enough that it will pour nicely into molds. If you want to do pulled sugar or spun sugar it needs to be just a tad thinner than corn syrup. You can always reheat it without a problem too; unlike regular granulated sugar.

GOOD LUCK!

Beth in KY

bobwonderbuns Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 1:38am
post #24 of 27

Thanks Beth! I've always wondered how to work with Isomalt. (frantically taking notes...) icon_lol.gif

bethola Posted 6 Jul 2008 , 1:46am
post #25 of 27

You're Welcome! I like working with Isomalt AND sugar. I just don't have the time I used to. My husband even built me a heating cabinet to work in! It just makes the cake kinda "pop"!

Oh yeah! Forgot to add. In my photos you will see a pink and white cake with a jewelry box that has blue "jewels" in it. I put pearlized luster dust in the Isomalt and it really looked cool, if I do say so myself!

Beth

sugarplum1635 Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 2:12pm
post #26 of 27

You people are simply amazing!!
I haven't had a chance to get back on here since Sun. nite, very late, and then I come on here this morning to find all this input and advice.
Started my creative juices flowing, I'll tell you.
Made me remember that I have a box of clear "Rock Candy" on stirrer sticks.

I'm going to try an experiment with them, by breaking them into (if I can) little pieces and attaching them on a piece of fondant that has been brushed with piping gel, then sprinkled with clear glitter Disco Dust.

If if looks anything like crystals, I may dodge the bullet and not have to use the Isomalt at all.
If, however, it does not work, I will use all of your hints and tips to get to where I need to be for this project. Don't remember if I mentioned it before, but this cake is not until October, so I have time to experiment. But need to price it today. I will give her choices for the different ways of doing it and let her choose - according to price and/or look.
I now have access to prices for the Isomalt and molds, because of all of you. And can test the time element while I try my 'rock candy' experiment.
Thanks for ALL the help. Again, you're truly AMAZING!!
Joanne

sugarplum1635 Posted 8 Jul 2008 , 4:34pm
post #27 of 27

Me Again,

Well, I tried my little experiment with the "Rock Candy" and I think I've found my solution.
I took a piece of white (well, off-white. It was what I had on hand) fondant, brushed it w/ a little piping gel, sprinkled with clear disco glitter and pressed pieces of the now broken up 'rocks' in the fondant. I think it looks pretty good.
However, when I tried to take a pic of it to send to the wedding planner, it didn't show up very well. Now what??
Well, I had some chocolate clay from another project on hand, so took a small piece of that - to see what the 'rocks' would look like on that and
Surprise, surprise, (as Gomer Pyle might have said) they show up very nicely on it, and photographed much better than on the white!!!
So instead of buying Isomalt and cooking etc. I'll buy a 5 lb. box of loose clear Rock Candy (mine was on swizzle/stirrer sticks, and I had to chop it off.) for about a $30.00 cost, as opposed to whatever I'd have had to pay for Isomalt and molds, and all the time investment in making them.

Gee, it's good to bounce ideas off each other, isn't it?? Might not have remembered the rock candy, if one of you hadn't mentioned Lorann Oils and hard candy etc.
I used to have a candy supply shop (for 16 years), and Lorann was one of my vendors!!
Dryden and Palmer is the place where I got the swizzle sticks and where I'll buy the loose rocks. Just thought I'd mention it, in case anyone else has a need for something like that.
Take care, all, and thanks again!!
Joanne

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