Help With Sylvia Weinstock Yellow Cake

Decorating By BakingJeannie Updated 4 Jul 2008 , 2:26pm by -K8memphis

BakingJeannie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 3:02pm
post #1 of 15

I need help with a problem I have when baking cakes where I need to add the egg whites at the end. I have done the cakes in the Cake Bible, Martha Stewarts recipes and now I tried Sylvia Weinstock Moist Yellow Cake and the attached picture shows my results. Granted, it is moist and delicious, but the crusting around the edge and shrinking from the pan, I can't figure what I'm doing wrong. It happens all the time when I add the egg whites at the end.

Any solutions?

Thanks,

Jeannie
LL
LL

14 replies
emrldsky Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 3:08pm
post #2 of 15

What temp are you baking at? If it's 350, try 325 and for longer. Also, it looks like you might be overfilling a little.

HTH!

BakingJeannie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 3:16pm
post #3 of 15

I am using 350 degrees. I will try it at 325. As a matter of fact, I think my oven is too hot because they sometimes get a little dry. I fill them halfway... icon_redface.gif

Thanks for the help I will use your suggestion.

Cheers thumbs_up.gif
Jeannie

-K8memphis Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 3:24pm
post #4 of 15

I LOVE that recipe! I do not separate my eggs however--I just add them one at at time to the creamed stuff. It bakes like a champion. So consistent--one of my favorite cakes on the planet. Y'know every oven and everything changes everthing in baking but mine bake full to the sides. I parchment the bottom and don't grease the edges.

Chef_Stef Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:01pm
post #5 of 15

If you don't have an oven thermometer in there, definitely get one. I had trouble with mine, got a therm, and my oven turns out to be 40 DEGREES too hot, so now 310 = 350.

I use her yellow cake recipe, but I hardly ever have people order yellow cake, so I can't recall if it does that or not. Her white cake recipe sometimes will look like that for me, but I always think it's because I didn't incorporate the white well enough into the batter when folding them in at the end. Maybe try making sure they're really well blended?

-K8memphis Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:23pm
post #6 of 15

But I mean her yellow recipe comes out white enough to be my white cake. I hate diddling with egg whites though.

BakingJeannie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:00pm
post #7 of 15

K8memphis:

Quote:
Quote:

I parchment the bottom and don't grease the edges




I parchment by bottom but I also grease the edges. Next time I will try not greasing the edges - I use shortening to grease my pans. Is that what you use too?

Homecook, I shall invest in a thermometer beceause I am sure my oven is too hot.

Thanks you all!

Jeannie

FromScratch Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:22pm
post #8 of 15

I parchment the bottom and grease the sides and separate the eggs and I have never had that happen. Could you be whipping the egg whites too much or not enough? Or not mixing them in enough? I am going to try adding the eggs whole like k8memphis said.. that's WAY easier.. good to know if works just as well. icon_smile.gif

wrightway777 Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:50pm
post #9 of 15

Have you tried experimenting with Bake-Even Strips. I used to scoff them but I do use them now for some of the cakes I bake. I do not use them if the cake is super moist (I have an Orange cake recipe that if I did use them the cake would be to crumbly). But in general (esp for your straight yellow cake) it will produce a nice and even surface.
Here is a site (posts are a few years old) that give some good tips on "sinking cakes":
http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=80884

also another tip (got it somewhere here on CC) use an upside down flower nail poking from underneath middle of parchment paper (cleaner that way) for any cake 10 inches and larger. It provides even baking.

-K8memphis Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 11:29pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkalman

I parchment the bottom and grease the sides and separate the eggs and I have never had that happen. Could you be whipping the egg whites too much or not enough? Or not mixing them in enough? I am going to try adding the eggs whole like k8memphis said.. that's WAY easier.. good to know if works just as well. icon_smile.gif




I use two egg whites and two whole eggs, CakeBuddy. It comes out pretty white for me. I love this recipe but I never use it for tier cakes because I am a freak about refrigerating my cakes. I get to control things better that way y'know?

I find that cakes baked with butter do not loosen up enough at room temperature to retain a moist feel in the mouth. The mouth feel of this cake after it comes back to room temp is dry. It is not dry--it's just that the butter is firm.

If you microzap this cake sans icing it is to die for awesome. I mean not so it's hot or anything just to loosen up that butter. Like 10 seconds.

So of course you can't do that if it's all decorated so that's why I don't use it for tier cakes unless someone pays a premium for it. Which I haven't had any takers yet.

But those are just my observations.

FromScratch Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 1:41pm
post #11 of 15

Cool. I think it's pretty darn white even with the 4 whole eggs. Most people prefer it to your basic white cake. I have made cakes with it that have been chilled and never had a complaint about it. Maybe though because I separate the eggs and it's lighter?? No clue.. now I am going to have to do some experimenting.. thanks a lot woman!! LOL.

And now I am going to have to get me some sodium alginate and try that iced tea caviar too.. I tell you.. you are making more work for me!!! icon_wink.gificon_lol.gif

MikeRowesHunny Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 2:04pm
post #12 of 15

k8memphis, have you tried swapping out the butter for a buttery-tasting margarine? Now, although I prefer butter everything (as my hips & thighs will testify to!), I find marg makes for a much moister & lighter cake, even when it's been chilled in the fridge and brought back to room temp. The flavour of the cake isn't any different either!

BakingJeannie Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 2:05pm
post #13 of 15

Help me, what is a "microzap"?

K8memphis wrote:

Quote:
Quote:

If you microzap this cake sans icing it is to die for awesome. I mean not so it's hot or anything just to loosen up that butter. Like 10 seconds.




I have baking strip, but used them once, I may need to start using the stuff on the shelves...

Thanks,

Jeannie

-K8memphis Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 2:21pm
post #14 of 15

So sorry, microzap is K8speak for 'put it in the microwave'. In this case for like 10 seconds.

-K8memphis Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 2:26pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonjovibabe

k8memphis, have you tried swapping out the butter for a buttery-tasting margarine? Now, although I prefer butter everything (as my hips & thighs will testify to!), I find marg makes for a much moister & lighter cake, even when it's been chilled in the fridge and brought back to room temp. The flavour of the cake isn't any different either!




I haven't tried that. Back in the day when good old margarine became almost crowded out by all the new and improved vegetable spreads I stopped using it altogether and switched to butter for cookies and stuff. I use all buttah icing.

But now that the spreads have come full circle and I use them on crackers & stuff--that is a great idea for that cake. I will remember that when I get to experimenting again.

Thanks, Cake-Buddy!

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