How Can I Do This With Buttercream? Help!

Decorating By CocoaBlondie Updated 4 Jul 2008 , 8:14pm by CocoaBlondie

CocoaBlondie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 2:33am
post #1 of 20

I have a wedding cake to make for a Bride in the fall. She showed me a picture of how she wants it to look exactly. The only thing is she wants all buttercream. From the photo it looks like there is a marble pattern & maybe shimmer dust as well. Anyone have any pointers?
LL

19 replies
waterlily Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 3:13am
post #2 of 20

Im thinking you would have to use air brush somehow. I personally would go to Lowes or home depot and look for a book on wall texturing with paint and see if you could apply it to the cake. Just a thought! detective.gif

PJ37 Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:14am
post #3 of 20

Could you use rolled buttercream? (RBC)

cakesbyallison Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:59am
post #4 of 20

It's definately airbrushed on fondant. You can airbrush on buttercream, and paint on (fine tip) marbled lines. Be sure you tell the bride, it's not going to look exactly like the cake she showed you - so often brides bring you a picture of a beautiful fondant cake, they want the same cake, but don't want fondant! icon_confused.gif They don't understand why some designs have to be on fondant, or made with fondant - to get that desired look. You don't want her to be disappointed if it doesn't look exactly like she envisioned! Tell her buttercream is under the fondant, and she can peel if off if she doesn't like it!

Janette Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 5:17am
post #5 of 20

I think you could air brush it.

I too tell the Brides that I can work with the picture but because the picture is Fondant it will not look exactly like the pic.

BrandisBaked Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 5:58am
post #6 of 20

Airbrushing.

Just make sure you keep the airbrush far away from the cake when you are spraying, so you get muted colors that blend into each other. Put it too close and you'll have a camouflage patterned cake! icon_smile.gif

Janette Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:04am
post #7 of 20

Brandi,

I've read where you can use shimmer dust in your air brush. Have you by any chance tried this?

miny Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:22am
post #8 of 20

After blending all the colors with the airbrush you can put a coat of pearl shimmer airbrush color just to get the shinny part on the BC, it won't look exactly the same but close.

CakeDiva73 Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 6:47am
post #9 of 20

That like ordering a cheeseburger and then advising the waiter you're a vegetarian and you want the cheeseburger to taste EXACTLY the same, except with no meat???????? wth?

This is my big complaint - all the customers love the designs and styles in fondant but they either don't like it or don't want to pay for it....but they want it to look exactly like the fondant cake??? pfft!!

Ok, sorry for my rant. I believe a gentle hand with an airbrush, shimmer/gold or luster dust and fondant accents (the leaves) will give you that 'effect'.

CocoaBlondie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 1:26pm
post #10 of 20

Sounds like airbrushing is the way to go! Someone said something about rolled Buttercream? Does anyone have a good recipe or info. Also where might I be able to find a good airbrush @ a resonable price? I'll be sure to tell her I can't dup. this cake exactly. Thanks

PJ37 Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 2:54pm
post #11 of 20

Rolled buttercream recipe
http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-1603-0-Rolled-Buttercream-Icing-Recipe.html

...and you could just marble this. You could look at my recent Easter cookies and see how it marbles. (I've never used this on cakes, just cookies, but you would handle just like fondant, I would think).

CocoaBlondie Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:31pm
post #12 of 20

Thanks for the recipe thread. I got a chance to look @ the cookies, they look great. I'll have to try this out. If I like working with it I'll give her a ring to taste test. Otherwise BUMP on the airbrush question? Is there a reasonable effecient one out there? Where might I find one?

aswartzw Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:39pm
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CocoaBlondie

Thanks for the recipe thread. I got a chance to look @ the cookies, they look great. I'll have to try this out. If I like working with it I'll give her a ring to taste test. Otherwise BUMP on the airbrush question? Is there a reasonable effecient one out there? Where might I find one?




RB is very hard to use to cover a cake(it's much more stretchy than fondant). I refrigerate mine after cutting just so it doesn't stretch before putting on my cookies.

CocoaBlondie Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 3:08am
post #14 of 20

What might you suggest I do for this cake? Maybe the rolled buttercream is not such a good idea. I hate to fool around with the wrong consistancy.

miny Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 3:19am
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by CocoaBlondie

Otherwise BUMP on the airbrush question? Is there a reasonable effecient one out there? Where might I find one?




Well, I have the airmaster, I have heard about people getting cheaper ones at the hardware store icon_eek.gif but I would not recomend this because they are way to hard on the delicate BC and you can end up with a hole in your cake!!! icon_surprised.gif , unless anyone has a recomendation to avoid this......

CocoaBlondie Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 1:26pm
post #16 of 20

Where did you purchase your airmaster??

BakingJeannie Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 1:44pm
post #17 of 20

Regarding the airbrush, I recently bought a small one at Michaels Craft from their art department, a Badger Model 250 (Basic Spray Gun Set for biginners). It cost abut $30 (Ihad a 50% off coupon!). This is the cake I'd done with it, came out with very big learning curve (for another fourum). You may notice the cake is slightly weeping... I picture of the kit I will also attach.

I got a large box and use it as my spray booth. Wear gloves or remember food spray will be on your hands.

Hope this help.

Cheers!

Jeannie
LL
LL

veronica970206 Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 1:55pm
post #18 of 20

If you cannot get an airbrush, what you can use and I would practice on a piece of paper before you apply it to the cake so you know what you have to do to get the look that you want, but use those applicator make-up wedges, of course use the smooth larger side, it is a smooth surface and it will give you that look that you are going for, and if you do not like something combine the other color and blend, just like make-up.

I have used so many paint techniques in my home and this is kinda like sponging, but without a "natural sponge" you will be using a complete flat surface to apply to the fondant. What do you have to lose $1.00 and some change for a bag of wedges? If it doesnt work, you have wedges to do your make-up, it is worth the try, but I think you will get it.

Good Luck,
Veronica

miny Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 6:53pm
post #19 of 20

I got my airmaster in the internet, I don't remember exactly the place but I looked all over until I found the cheapest, but also there are some cake magazines that have a discount coupon for KopyKake. An airbrush booth is a great idea but with airmaster you don't get color in your hands. usaribbon.gif (Happy 4th...)

CocoaBlondie Posted 4 Jul 2008 , 8:14pm
post #20 of 20

Thanks everyone for the great advice. I'm going to check out that airmaster.

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