Beginning To Think I...hate Convection Baking...?

Business By Chef_Stef Updated 3 Jul 2008 , 8:09pm by Rhienn

Chef_Stef Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 5:54am
post #1 of 13

What IS it with convection? I don't think I've ever baked a cake in a convection oven and liked the result! They are always too dry, no matter what I do.

I spent 3 hours at a new rental kitchen today and used both the gas and the convection ovens, to try them all out, and the convection oven, even with me watching it very closely, using bake-even strips, with the fan turned to low, and with the temp at 300-325 (it kept fluctuating!), the cakes are all too dry to use for a wedding. What a waste of time, ingredients and money!

Am I the only one who thinks convection ovens are a bust? At least I know--if I ever build, I doubt I'd invest in one. Even if the ability to bake all at once is cool, the dry cakes are beyond salvage except as parfait or something. thumbsdown.gificon_razz.gificon_sad.gif

12 replies
pinkbiz Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 6:23am
post #2 of 13

well at least in my case i use convection oven and they come out just fine. when i first started they did come out dry and it was because i opened the oven d oor all the time!! big time no no after i learned that t they started coming out perfect. anyways good luck and i recommend that if your cakes come out better with the gas oven just stick with it. you don't want a dry cake! ... oh by the way if they do come out dry i recommend to do a simple syrup recipee and just pour on the cake.

( this is the one i usually use)
1 cup of water
1 cup white sugar
1 peel of lime
1/4 cup of rum ( i usually use Cruzan's Orange Rum..but you can use any flavor you like)

in a small pot add water and sugar and peel of lime let simmer until all the sugar is melted and you have created a simple syrup... turn off the heat and let it cool

when it is completely cooled add the 1/4 cup of rum and just put it in a squirt bottle and pour it on your cake evenly

add as much as you want you can use the whole recipe or just half it depends on how moist you want the cake!

i hope you like this recipe or this can help you !believe me that is my most requested cake! icon_biggrin.gif

Chef_Stef Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 6:25am
post #3 of 13

Hmm I WAS opening the door a lot, but that was because I have no idea how long to bake in the conv. oven...

I'll keep trying, but I'm not liking it so far. *pout*

Thanks for the syrup recipe--I use a wash on about half my cakes, and that one sounds really good!

littlecake Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 7:33am
post #4 of 13

i have one....you might be baking too hot.

i bake at 275 with the fan on low....my cakes are moist.

good luck, i hate trying new stuff and it seems like it sux, so frustrating!

CakeWhizz Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 8:55am
post #5 of 13

Sorry to hear about the trouble you are having with the convection oven. With a convection oven there has to be about a 50 degree Fahrenheit (30 degree Celsius) reduction in cooking temperature, compared to a conventional oven. This comparison will however vary, depending on factors including, for example, how much baking is being done at once or if airflow is being restricted by using an over sized baking tray.

foxymomma521 Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 10:45am
post #6 of 13

Can you put a cake pan full of water in the oven along with your cakes to help?

indydebi Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 12:10pm
post #7 of 13

My first 3 convection oven cakes went right in the trash. I finally found the right combination of 275 degrees with a pan of water in the bottom of the oven to add moisture.

And if you want to check on your cakes, just look in the window. thumbs_up.gif

smab109 Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 3:03pm
post #8 of 13

My gas convenction oven automatically lowers the temp 25 degrees. I've never had a problem with dry cakes, and I dont put a pan of water in there.

And yes, just turn the light on to check the cakes, dont open the door!

Chef_Stef Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 3:24pm
post #9 of 13

Ok, I'll keep trying it. Next time I'll play with it at 275-300 instead of 300-325, but this thing was very touchy and every time I moved the temp knob, the temp would change too much, so some of the time it was at 350...It has to be me, because these ovens are all brand new.

Probably wedding cakes weren't the best thing to test it on, since now I have to rebake a 6, 8, 10" cake--*sigh*

On the flip side, I'm delighted to have found such a perfect rental kitchen, once I figure out the ovens.

Thanks for the encouragement--you guys rock, as always...

golfgirl1227 Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 5:07pm
post #10 of 13

I feel your pain. My oven blows the crap out of my cupcake batter. They end up being such a weird shape, lol. I don't have an adjustable fan either.

I read somewhere to preheat the oven and then turn the fan off and put the item in the oven until it sets, and then turn the fan back on. Not sure how that will work, haven't tried it yet. Anyone else have any suggestions (not trying to hijack the post)?

snarkybaker Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 5:14pm
post #11 of 13

Gas convection ovens bake with moist heat and tend to be the choice of yeast dough bakers. Electric ovens are more often used for pastry. That said the best arrangement is an oven with a variable speed reversing fan. Most true pastry ovens have this feature, like Doyen ovens out of Quebec, but short of purchasing a new oven, you have been given some good advice. I would add you should probably invest in an oven thermometer, as gas ovens especially vary wildly in their temperature accuracy.

Chef_Stef Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 7:03pm
post #12 of 13

Yeah, I'm sorta hung up on my gas oven.

These new ovens had thermometers in them, but they kept varying in temp each time I fiddled with the controls...

bleh

Thanks everybody! I'll just have to keep tinkering with it.

Rhienn Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 8:09pm
post #13 of 13

I had the same convection oven woes too... I still like conventional better, but I've learned to compensate for the convection.

Golfgirl - I've fixed the sloped cupcakes by rotating them nice and early. About 5-7 minutes into baking I turn the pans. No more ski slopes!

I also bake at just under 300 degrees in the convection (350 in conventional) and use a pan of water in the bottom of the oven.

AND - it really seems like there's more "carry over" baking with the convection. I'm very careful to take them out promptly or they crust way too much.

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