What Should Or Should Not Do When Renting A Kitchen

Business By Jovy Updated 1 Jul 2008 , 10:25pm by saap1204

Jovy Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 4:35pm
post #1 of 9

Do you ladies leave your stuff locked(mixer, cakes, utensiles..ect) in the kitchen you are renting?

do you bake the cakes and decorate them in the rent kitchen or you just bake and decorate at home?

if they dont have a fridge do you buy one or rent one?

please tell me your experince about renting kitchen

thanks

8 replies
JoAnnB Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 5:42pm
post #2 of 9

legally, you have to do the entire cake in the licensed kitchen. Certainly if they don't have a fridge, you will need to buy one-see if you can get a lock.

It works better to store your 'stuff' at the location. Schlepping all that back and forth is a pain.

CoutureCake Posted 29 Jun 2008 , 5:50am
post #3 of 9

For the expense you're going to put into renting a spcae, the frustration you're going to experience, climbing over other people's workspace, time spent cleaning up someone else's MESS, you're better off to build a basic space of YOUR OWN that's just enough to get you a license and build the business then reinvest your money when you have the first phase paid off (and is also when the bank will give you a better line of credit anyways because you're established in the community).

If you've got the time, I've got the horror stories from what I had to deal with at the place I was renting until they decided to kick me out of the space because they could. Suffice to say I should have been on the payroll as the cleaning lady is how the weeks I had cakes due went..

Your business is either going to succeed or fail based on you alone. Being in a rented space is going to cost you more than a mortgage on a small yet adequate space and newer used equipment that has had a lot of sweat equity put into it. It's also less stress to own your own space because it is yours. By owning you won't be at the mercy of whomever you're renting from which is what happened ultimately to me getting kicked out of the space without notice. I found out the Tuesday before I had a competition cake due that I had to be completely out of the space NOW, not tomorrow, NOW, all of my equipment, EVERYTHING.

cocorum21 Posted 29 Jun 2008 , 1:05pm
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoutureCake


Your business is either going to succeed or fail based on you alone. Being in a rented space is going to cost you more than a mortgage on a small yet adequate space and newer used equipment that has had a lot of sweat equity put into it. It's also less stress to own your own space because it is yours. By owning you won't be at the mercy of whomever you're renting from which is what happened ultimately to me getting kicked out of the space without notice. I found out the Tuesday before I had a competition cake due that I had to be completely out of the space NOW, not tomorrow, NOW, all of my equipment, EVERYTHING.




Not to be discouraging Jovy, but I'm with CoutureCake on this one. You are at the mercy of the person you are renting from. I just got a space of my own after renting from a cafe. I came back from Holiday vacation and the place closed! tapedshut.gif Can you imagine?! Of course I had a key to get in but still, WTH?!@#^$ And when I called the owner, I was told that I could continue to use the place until the electricity went off!! WTF! icon_evil.gificon_evil.gif Then I set up with a caterer to rent from them, they gave me a contract that really wasn't protecting me in any way but I just lost the first space and I really needed something, and then the day before I was supposed to move in they called and told me they wanted to be paid in cash. No proof I paid my rent, no receipt from them.....BIG RED FLAG. Needless to say I didn't go through with renting from them.

I got used equipment from auction from the school board. It may not be shiny and new but it's mine and it's paid for. Only my oven will be new. And my space is being laid out the way I want it to be, which is important because I have a small child that I can take to work with me and he has his own playroom in the back. Like CoutureCake said, my success or my failure will be just that, MINE.

ps
The cleaning thing was just craziness! I still don't understand how some restaurants can get licensed with the filth in their kitchens. My home kitchen is 1000x's cleaner than the kitchen that i rented from. Pissed me off everytime I had to go there to bake.

shaloop Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 2:28am
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoutureCake

For the expense you're going to put into renting a spcae, the frustration you're going to experience, climbing over other people's workspace, time spent cleaning up someone else's MESS, you're better off to build a basic space of YOUR OWN that's just enough to get you a license and build the business then reinvest your money when you have the first phase paid off (and is also when the bank will give you a better line of credit anyways because you're established in the community).




Well, I rent from a caterer. I've been there for a couple of months and although we've had a few crazy days when we both needed to be in there and had to try to work around each other, for the most part it's working out ok. I'd love to have my own space and found a 350 sq ft space for $350/month to rent a few months ago. Having electrical work, plumbing and other work done to make it into a commerical kitchen would have cost me $11,000 plus the cost of equipment just to get in it and get licensed. I would have been looking at $15,000 - $20,000 to get into a space that would have been just kitchen. When you don't have the money it's just not an option. You have to find another option. I found a caterer to rent from for the same amount of rent but no costs to set up a kitchen. I don't consider it a permanent solution, but it allows me to stay in business until I find a financing option for my own place. And, I've already been in business a year. I'm showing a profit and my business has grown considerably. Banks still don't just hand out money. At least that's what's been my experience. If anyone has any creative financing ideas, I'd love to hear them. But some of us just have to use what we've got to work with until we can do otherwise.

cakesbyallison Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 5:01am
post #6 of 9

I agree w/ shaloop... at the time I was looking into kitchen rental, vs. purchasing my own space, rental was by far more economical for me. Though I wanted my own space, lease costs were way out of my price range. I found a place to rent, and though it wasn't "perfect", it worked - and it allowed me to build my business. The owner of the shop was most accomodating (heck, I was probably paying 1/2 is rent!) I had my own key, worked there when he was closed, had some space (though did have to cart things back and forth which was a huge pain!) I did need my own fridge which I had to purchase, but was able to use the rest of his equipment, which was nice. Guess it just depends on who your renting from. Make sure it works for you - not just them. Otherwise it's not worth it!

Shakti Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 5:54am
post #7 of 9

I haven't moved there yet, but the commercial kitchen I'm looking into sounds AWESOME. They call it a 'cooperative kitchen', and they really work with small food businesses and help them out. The owner of the kitchen was a baker so she has a lot of knowledge about how the kitchen needs to be equipped, for example, she has a separate fridge for baked goods and cakes and whatnot so they don't pick up savory and weird flavors like onion and whatnot from the other cooks' items.

They also have a kitchen account that they order from vendors with, and you can buy through them stuff you wouldn't have access to otherwise, since a lot of vendors have high minimums that one-person operations can't meet.

This particular kitchen even has decorating space that costs almost a third of what it costs to rent out the entire kitchen, so even that works out. It's a wonderful little kitchen and I hope it goes as well as I'm imagining it will!

I'm just sayin, there are some good ones out there, just research them thoroughly. Look up 'cooperative kitchens', maybe that'll help?

Jovy Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 5:37pm
post #8 of 9

I appreciate your feedback and words of wisdom You all gave me hope that I can find something that I can afford. Now I know what to look for when renting a kitchen.

Jovy icon_smile.gifthumbs_up.gif

saap1204 Posted 1 Jul 2008 , 10:25pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by shaloop

Banks still don't just hand out money. At least that's what's been my experience. If anyone has any creative financing ideas, I'd love to hear them.





Have any of you looked into person to person Lending Networks such as Prosper, Lending Club or Zopa? It may be a viable alternative for those with proven track records... Basically its a group of people willing to lend a small amount (collectively adding up to a larger amount) to individuals who need to borrow money -- often for a business. May be worth a look ?

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