Roses Covering The Entire Cake

Decorating By Sonja2008 Updated 3 Jul 2008 , 9:00pm by indydebi

Sonja2008 Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 5:18pm
post #1 of 22

How do I cover an entire cake with buttercream roses without using toothpicks? Do you all think the royal icing spikes will work.

21 replies
KHalstead Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:17pm
post #2 of 22

hmmmm....I'm thinking royal icing might break and definitely will start to melt when inserted into the cake.. What about using spaghetti?? I mean you'd still have to remove them but if they broke off or you didn't get EVERYONE of them out, at least they're edible.

leah_s Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:38pm
post #3 of 22

I do the cake below just by piping the flowers onto the cake, and for the roses, just putting on a blob of bc and pushing it on there.
LL

foxymomma521 Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:46pm
post #4 of 22

OMG Leahs, that cake is stunning!

-K8memphis Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:51pm
post #5 of 22

Oh Leah that's stunner beautiful. I love that style. Really frufru elegant but happy too, angelic.

You had your bc roses made and dried in advance right?

leah_s Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:54pm
post #6 of 22

Oh yeah about the dried in advance. On the sides I frequently cheat and throw on some RI bought roses too. Whatever works. You would not believe how fast that cake is to do - with a significant amounn of prep of course. I seriously started that cake at 9 p.m. (base icing, which can look pretty crappy since it's giong to be covered up) and was finshed by midnight.

tonedna Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 3:05pm
post #7 of 22

I use a blob of buttercream just like leah..If it is buttercream on buttercream.. If it is fondant You can use RI or white chocolate..The white chocolate works fabulous
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

PS...beautiful cake leah!

something_sweet Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 3:11pm
post #8 of 22

Um... this is a dumb question, but what is RI?

gottabakenow Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 3:13pm
post #9 of 22

RI is royal icing.

KHalstead Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 4:24pm
post #10 of 22

leah that cake is amazing and drove me to look at your website, can I just say I LOVE what you say about the cakes being assembled mostly on-site, regardless of what you see on Food TV! LOL

mareg Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 4:30pm
post #11 of 22

My roses always fall off with bc and bc roses. What is the trick??

Sonja2008 Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 5:19pm
post #12 of 22

Ok so what if the roses are extremely close together like a bed of roses with leaves poking out between. Do you all think that will be too heavy with out toothpicks? I like the idea of the spagetti...just worried about the looks I would get.

leah_s Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 7:28pm
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mareg

My roses always fall off with bc and bc roses. What is the trick??




A BIG blob of bc. Then leaves.

tonedna Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 11:40pm
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mareg

My roses always fall off with bc and bc roses. What is the trick??



I wonder if the consistency of your icing is too soft...maybe you are not pushing them in the icing enough... or maybe not putting enough icing..
Edna

mareg Posted 1 Jul 2008 , 3:24pm
post #15 of 22

Is the blob of bc pushing out the sides of the petals and then you cover with leaves? I could try that. I maybe just trying not to show the blob and that is just not enough to keep it on there.

Is the blob supposed to be very stiff?

Sonja2008 Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 1:41pm
post #16 of 22

Ok so I gave up trying to get them to cover the entire cake. I did something wrong with the frosting. So here is the cake I made. I stole this idea from Earlenes cakes.

indydebi Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 1:49pm
post #17 of 22

Air dry the roses. This removes the moisture from the roses and makes them very very light ... more apt to stay on.

I'm a "blop of icing" person, too. For the blop, I use the color icing that will be used for the leaves (green leaves .... green blop .... white leaves ... white blop). Then it doesnt' matter if any of the blop shows because it blends in when you make the BC leaves.

I cant' recall a rose ever falling off of a cake. And as leah says, with proper prep, it takes no time to cover a cake with roses.

mareg Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 2:57pm
post #18 of 22

Indydebi, Do you air dry the bc roses too, or were you refering to the RI roses?

indydebi Posted 2 Jul 2008 , 9:13pm
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mareg

Indydebi, Do you air dry the bc roses too, or were you refering to the RI roses?




I never use RI because air-dried BC works just fine.

mareg Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 4:24pm
post #20 of 22

Wow. I didn't know that! How long do you air dry them before placing them on the cake?

dynee Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 5:01pm
post #21 of 22

Indydebi, What kind of BC do you use? Is it just a crusting BC or do you have a special recipe you use of this?

indydebi Posted 3 Jul 2008 , 9:00pm
post #22 of 22

THis is the only icing I've used for 25 years ... http://forum.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-6992-Indydebis-Crisco-Based-Buttercream-Icing.html ... for flowers, roses, borders, strings, everything. I just adjust the milk for consistency.

I can make roses in the morning and they are ready to put on the cake by the early afternoon (or sooner). I try to make them the day before, though, so they are ready to go when I get to the decorating part.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%