Placing Fresh Hydrangea Directly On Cake

Decorating By LorienSkye Updated 26 Jun 2008 , 1:04pm by wgoat5

LorienSkye Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 3:08am
post #1 of 17

I have a wedding cake for this weekend in which the bride would like a 3 tiered cake with fresh hydrangea placed between the tiers (i.e: the "tower of roses" effect but with hydrangea.) I will not be sticking the stems of the hydrangea into the cake at all, but I am still nervous about even placing them directly on top of the cake. What do you all do with fresh flowers? Do you think I should use a second separator plate on top of each tier to place the hydrangea on? I just hate the look of that second plate........

16 replies
PinkZiab Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 3:26am
post #2 of 17

I'm personally not a fan of fresh flowers on a cake and don't do it myself, but if you do, make sure they are organic/food safe flowers that have been grown with pesticides or chemicals. Otherwise, I've got nothing... lol

leah_s Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 3:41am
post #3 of 17

I believe that ALL parts of the hydrangea are poisonous. Just place waxed paper or parchment on top of the cake and lay your flowers on that.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 3:43am
post #4 of 17

I think hydrangea wilt faster than roses so place them as last minute as possible.

soygurl Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 4:01am
post #5 of 17

Ok... I just have a question here... Sure, all parts of the hydrangea plant may be poisonous (or toxic at least), but would someone REALLY get sick from eating a slice of cake that a petal touched for a while? I mean, I touch flowers all the time, and I rarely (if ever) wash my hands directly after, and I KNOW I eat things within a few minutes so if you think about it, that's not much different than licking a flower right? And if licking a flower wouldn't make someone sick (I can't see that it would, at least for non-exotic plants), how would having a flower sitting on top of some icing for a few hours possibly transfer enough toxin to make someone sick?

I'm no plant expert, so I'm truly asking a question here... it just doesn't make sense to me!

And for the record, the bakery I work at uses fresh flowers on ALL our cakes (wedding and birthday)... Pushed directly into the cake, and we use ANY type of flower (MOST are non edible) and NONE of them are organic or washed. I do NOT condone this practice, and I HATE doing it, but my boss won't listen to reason on this issue, and I need my job. HOWEVER, we've never gotten any complaints about anyone getting sick. One time a man called and asked if the flowers on his cake were edible... we said probably not, and he said "well, I ate them." icon_rolleyes.gif Never heard anything back from him, but I assume that he'd have filed a major complaint if he'd gotten sick... icon_confused.gif

But I defiantly don't see a problem with placing a flower on top of icing... at least I can't see it making anyone sick. icon_rolleyes.gificon_confused.gif

-K8memphis Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:05am
post #6 of 17

I have a real ticky stomach. And of course sometimes it's worse than others. I mean I could get sick from cake that was fine. I could already be sick before I eat it. Hey I don't even have to eat and get sick. icon_lol.gif

I mean life is risk. So I'm not saying oooh woogy boogie they are gonna getcha. I'm just saying think of the youngest, the oldest and the infirm and consider making your product as great as possible. Probably nobody would ever get sick. If somebody did get sick from something else and question were asked you would want to be prepared with the cleanest brightest answers and products.

If new mommy bear takes a little swipe of icing on her finger tip and places it in baby's little brand new fresh vulnerable mouth in your heart you want to feel happy and good about that. You don't want to suck all the air out of the room y'know?

I don't go overboard with the flower thing. I'm reasonably careful.

wgoat5 Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:30am
post #7 of 17

There are some BEAUTIFUL live LOOKING hydrangea silk flowers.... I mean soooo real looking...

Nobody should take a risk with toxic flowers.. and if you do you really want to take every precaution you have to ...

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:37am
post #8 of 17

If it's on the list of toxic flowers, I won't put them on the cake. Silks are made very well these days.

spring Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:43am
post #9 of 17

Is there any way you can let the florist place the flowers? The reason I ask is because hydrangeas wilt and wilt fast if not placed in water. My concern is that the hydrangeas won't hold up.

Minette
My Blog www.minetterushing.typepad.com

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:48am
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by spring

Is there any way you can let the florist place the flowers? The reason I ask is because hydrangeas wilt and wilt fast if not placed in water. My concern is that the hydrangeas won't hold up.

Minette
My Blog www.minetterushing.typepad.com




At my weddings, florists are usually long come-and-gone by the time I get there to set up the cake.

LorienSkye Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:53am
post #11 of 17

Thanks for all of the great feedback, ladies. I think I will consult my cake mentor today and see what she says, also, but it sounds like the best course of action will be to place her live hydrangea on the table top around the base of the cake and use silks directly ON the cake thumbs_up.gif

southerncake Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 11:57am
post #12 of 17

I always cut a piece of wax paper the same size of the cake, so that no flowers are actually touching the cake.

As for the poisonous plant thing...my degree is in horticulture, and I do not remember the exact stats for hydrangea (and it would vary from species to species), but for many plants (not all) put in the poisonous category you would have to consume literally hundreds of leaves/flowers (depending on the plant) to get sick.

With that said, I still don't like any flower actually touching my cake for the shear fact that I don't know what it was sprayed with right before it left the nursery!

And yes, hydrangeas wilt FAST!! They really need to be in florist's water tubes if possible.

-K8memphis Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 12:11pm
post #13 of 17

Y'know I been thinking about the silk versus fresh thing. And as an aside here, I get the serious heebee jeebee's when I see feather boa's, peacock feathers etc. on or near cakes. And I am not at all Polly Purebred with my cakes. But feathers are a huge no no for me.

So all that to say, wonder how much lead is in the silk flower stems. And for sure they are not near as well kept as fresh in the sense of possible rodent activity and etc. I bought a bunch of tables all boxed up at a local big box crafty place for the bookstore and the amount of mouse puckus was disturbing to say the least. I had to take the boxes outside to deal with it. Yuck squared.

I use fresh I use silk (no feathers!) I'm just thinking out loud here.

wgoat5 Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 12:26pm
post #14 of 17

In regards to the cleanliness of the silk and other fake flowers.. there is a way to make them clean.. there is actually a spray (I have it for greenery that is above my cabinets in the kitchen) that cleans anything off of the flowers... but I would much rather do that then to put something that MAY be deadly to someone severely allergic ...

southerncake Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 12:39pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Y'know I been thinking about the silk versus fresh thing. And as an aside here, I get the serious heebee jeebee's when I see feather boa's, peacock feathers etc. on or near cakes. And I am not at all Polly Purebred with my cakes. But feathers are a huge no no for me.

So all that to say, wonder how much lead is in the silk flower stems. And for sure they are not near as well kept as fresh in the sense of possible rodent activity and etc. I bought a bunch of tables all boxed up at a local big box crafty place for the bookstore and the amount of mouse puckus was disturbing to say the least. I had to take the boxes outside to deal with it. Yuck squared.

I use fresh I use silk (no feathers!) I'm just thinking out loud here.




I completely agree! We don't know where these silk flowers come from, where they've been before they get to us, or what they contain!

-K8memphis Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 12:54pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by wgoat5

In regards to the cleanliness of the silk and other fake flowers.. there is a way to make them clean.. there is actually a spray (I have it for greenery that is above my cabinets in the kitchen) that cleans anything off of the flowers... but I would much rather do that then to put something that MAY be deadly to someone severely allergic ...




Severely allergic would not eat food like that or they would be playing Russion roulette.

Where/how do we know that someone could actually die from a flower on a cake. I don't think we have that proof. They might get sicker maybe maybe not. It's more of a bad call that would be uncomfortable to explain later if something untoward happened like with some other food substance or something was being investigated.

Mouse poop or mouse poop residue could really be deadly. Oh look, honey, some stray chocolate sprinkles... icon_lol.gif

wgoat5 Posted 26 Jun 2008 , 1:04pm
post #17 of 17

OHHH YUMMM LOL

I see what you are saying icon_smile.gif

I think its a iffy thing anyways..

You know.. our cake boards/drums/etc are delivered from warehouses... so who knows what has crawled on them or done what have you icon_sad.gif ... be extremely cautious.. wash wash and wash again icon_sad.gif ... except how do you wash a drum??????????? You can wipe down but not wash

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