onlybluemomma Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:14pm
post #1 of

How long does it bake.. and what is the best temperature.. i've never baked a cake this size before!

26 replies
cb_one Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:29pm
post #2 of

It will probably take about 50min at 350 but depending on how much batter you put in, it could be more.

ccr03 Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:30pm
post #3 of

I bake at regular 350- same as the others I do.

It does take a little longer, maybe like 40-45 minutes. I'm bad I never really pay attention - I just get the feeling of how long it's been in there.

crystalina1977 Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:30pm
post #4 of

depends if it's 2" or 3"deep or well. check out this chart on the wilton site, it's very helpful:
http://www.wilton.com/cake/cakeprep/baking/times/index.cfm

crystalina1977 Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:33pm
post #5 of

depends if it's 2" or 3"deep or well. check out this chart on the wilton site, it's very helpful:
http://www.wilton.com/cake/cakeprep/baking/times/index.cfm

butterflywings Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 4:54pm
post #6 of

i bake ALL of my cakes at 325* and my 12" sq 2" deep pan takes right at about an hour. i suggest the lower temp b/c it will help prevent the edges getting too done or burnt with the center not being done enough.

onlybluemomma Posted 25 Jun 2008 , 8:21pm
post #7 of

thanks so much for your help.. the 12 inch cakes (2 of them) turned out great!

Bluesea Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 8:43am
post #8 of

i am gonna bake two 11" cakes this weekend (1st time baking a big cake). i understand from the wilton site that for cakes over 10" you have to use a heating core when baking.

can someone pls explain this to me. have not done this before.

thank you.

jenbashore Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 9:35am
post #9 of

I just baked 2-12in rounds yesterday and I didn't need a heating core. I would say anything bigger, maybe. I baked them at 325 for about an hour.

CakeWhizz Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 10:25am

I think it would also help to wrap some well soaked baking strips or strips made from old towels round the outside of the baking pan. It was a tip I picked up from here and it really helps.

leah_s Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 10:57am

I think basically it's whatever works for you and your oven. I bake at about 300, but I'm using electric convection. I have never in all my years used a heat core nor a flower nail to bake.

gottabakenow Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 12:21pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesea

i am gonna bake two 11" cakes this weekend (1st time baking a big cake). i understand from the wilton site that for cakes over 10" you have to use a heating core when baking.

can someone pls explain this to me. have not done this before.

thank you.




you can also use a flower nail or two. put them inverted (the flat side down on the pan) in the middle, pour your batter in, and bake. what it does is conduct the heat towards the middle of the pan and keeps the middle baking at the same rate as the edges, reducing dome and browning edges.

the flower nails are nice because they only leave a tiny hole that's barely noticeable.

SCPATTICAKESCREACTIONS Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 12:32pm

Did I understand correctly...you can use strips of towel that has been soaked for baking strips? Do they work well?

southerncake Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 12:45pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I think basically it's whatever works for you and your oven. I bake at about 300, but I'm using electric convection. I have never in all my years used a heat core nor a flower nail to bake.




I agree. My oven works best at 325 and a 12" probably takes about an hour. I used a heat core once and threw it out, and then I swore by the flower nails forever and then a few months ago didn't use them a couple of times (basically out of shear laziness!) and could tell no difference! So, no more flower nails for me!

leah_s Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:27pm

Don't make baking harder that it needs to be. Turn your oven temp down a bit, pour the batter in the pan and put the pan in the oven.

PinkZiab Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:35pm
Quote:
Quote:

Don't make baking harder that it needs to be. Turn your oven temp down a bit, pour the batter in the pan and put the pan in the oven.




AMEN!

gottabakenow Posted 27 Jun 2008 , 2:37pm

yes Leah, that's what I do. icon_smile.gif

Bluesea Posted 29 Jun 2008 , 1:25pm

I just finished baking and it didn't turn out well. Pls see picture below. I baked on a 13x10 pan for 45mins at 180C (350F). I placed a flower nail. Used 10cups of batter. The cake sank after i took it out of the oven. Please tell me what went wrong in my method. I have an order for a birthday cake in 2weeks time. Thanks.
Image

indydebi Posted 29 Jun 2008 , 2:34pm

I'm with leahs. Don't make it harder than it is. Batter in the pan, pan in the oven. I don't even use a timer. I KNOW when a cake is done.

Directions for any recipe, to me, are merely suggestions. Do what works for you. I have a low tolerance level for anything that starts out with "you HAVE to use ......" because 9 times out of 10, that's NOT how I do, thus it negates the "HAVE to" statement.

Wilton is in the business of selling cake equipment, so of COURSE they will tell you that you HAVE to use a heating core. That's how they suck you into spending more money with them.

I've never used a heating core or flower nails. Baking strips only.

In my convection oven, I found that a pan of water in the bottom, and baking at 275 works best for me.

leah_s Posted 29 Jun 2008 , 2:39pm

Well, to start with it's simply not done, which is why it sank in the middle. It's not browned at all and the sides haven't even begun to pull away from the pan. Also, 8 cups of batter should have been plenty. And turn your temp down to 325.

Bluesea Posted 30 Jun 2008 , 1:59am

hi leahs, thanks for the feedback. the cake is actually already out of the pan. the sides did pull away and i tested with tooth pick to see if it was cooked. i left it in the pan for about 15mins before i took it out of the pan and transferred it on to the cake board. the cake looked looked when i first took it out of the oven but after about 15mins it sank.

ok, will try again with temp 325.

madras650 Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 5:58pm

I usually use a baking core, today I used a flower nail for the first time. Worked like a charm. I will never use the core again...EVER!

12" x 3" pan
Flower nail
Heat oven to 350
After I put cake in oven reduced heat to 325
baked about 50-55 minutes
Best cake I ever baked.


I agree about keeping it simple, I wish simple worked for me icon_biggrin.gif

mightydragon663 Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 6:10pm

Is the flower nail, nail side up or nail side down. If it is nail side down, how to keep it from falling over in the batter. (I have tried the core and hate it.)

madras650 Posted 26 Aug 2009 , 6:13pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mightydragon663

Is the flower nail, nail side up or nail side down. If it is nail side down, how to keep it from falling over in the batter. (I have tried the core and hate it.)




Hi there,

keep the pointy end up, just set it in the middle of the cake. WORKED so nice. I wish I would have got rid of that core months ago.
Good luck!

Megs1025 Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 9:05am

i'm getting ready to try the nail method on the 18'' half round pan. First time I've baked in the pan, and really didn't want to use the heating core. Thanks for your advise everybody!

Loucinda Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 12:35pm

Megs - I use the half round all the time, no need for any heating core - I don't use the towels/wraps around the outside either. Just lower the oven temp and you are good to go.

momma28 Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 12:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluesea

hi leahs, thanks for the feedback. the cake is actually already out of the pan. the sides did pull away and i tested with tooth pick to see if it was cooked. i left it in the pan for about 15mins before i took it out of the pan and transferred it on to the cake board. the cake looked looked when i first took it out of the oven but after about 15mins it sank.

ok, will try again with temp 325.




I agree with Leahs, I have a recipe that will test done but if I dont give it 2 minutes past that point it will sink. Just know from making it so often. Sinking can also be a sign of underbeating, bad or too little baking powder, or too low oven temp but if it was beautiful until you took it out it sounds like that toothpick lied icon_wink.gif

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