Can Someone Help Me Price Out An Order...new Here

Business By Beanie1001 Updated 21 Jun 2008 , 2:53am by SugarBakerz

Beanie1001 Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 4:44pm
post #1 of 11

I have a first order that I'm doing. I'm making a baptism cake to feed 25 people, so I'm doing a 8 inch 2 layer square cake. Buttercream icing like the picture attached. I'm also making two dozen cupcakes, chocolate and vanilla. I have a price matrix downloaded but I wanted to see how one would price this, ballpark?
LL

10 replies
SugarBakerz Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 4:53pm
post #2 of 11

beanie, where are you located? That will be the first hurdle in jumping to price your items. I think you should charge per serving on your 2 layer cake, and then set a price limit for your cupcakes by the dozen. If you are doing intricate cupcake detail, make it one price, while making a basic iced cc like 1M tip iced, a cheaper price, give them the option. You can always say you will create the CCs to match the cake for the more detailed pricing, and most times a customer will grab at that. As for flavor, IMO those are pretty standard flavors so I wouldn't charge any more for them, as I would some premium flavor... like carrot or or white chocolate mocha.... I hope this helps you....

ribby0224 Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 4:53pm
post #3 of 11

I charge $1.50 ps for bc cakes, but this one has some fondant accents so I would add an additional $5-10 onto the cake price for that. That would make the cake $42.50-47.50. Two dozen cupcakes for me are $30. Order total would come to to $72.50-77.50. That is not including delivery. I charge what the state has on their website for what you can claim, which is .48 per mile, round trip. These prices may be lower than what is standard for your area or higher. Just adjust it to what you are comfortable with. Hope that helps.

jewelykaye Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 5:00pm
post #4 of 11

8-inch Square= 20 servings

My buttercream starts at $2.00/serving. With this cake it has some fondant accents and the pillowed sides so I would up it to $2.50/serving.

20 servings x $2.50/serving =$50.00

For simple cupcakes I charge $1.50/cupcake.

24 cupcakes x $1.50/cupcakes =$36.00

Total of $86.00

Beanie1001 Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 5:03pm
post #5 of 11

I am in Philadelphia, in Delaware County about 20 minutes outside of the city. Thanks for your help!

indydebi Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:51pm
post #6 of 11

8" square serves 32 per the wilton wedding chart (1x2x4" slices), which is what I use to determine pricing, not necessarily to determine number of servings.

32 servings times my BC rate of $3 = $96
24 cupcakes at $2/each = $48
Total: $144.

Bear in mind, this is not a $150 cake ... and it's not cake to serve 25 people. Cake is priced based on how many servings it's DESIGNED to serve, not how many servings they plan to cut from it. There's 56 servings of cake, here.

chelley325 Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 1:31am
post #7 of 11

indydebi - could you elaborate on your pricing method above? Where did you get the 56 servings? I'm curious as I am new and trying to figure out the whole pricing thing as well.

indydebi Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 1:42am
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by chelley325

indydebi - could you elaborate on your pricing method above? Where did you get the 56 servings? I'm curious as I am new and trying to figure out the whole pricing thing as well.




32 servings in the 8" square.
24 cupcakes
____
56

chelley325 Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 1:45am
post #9 of 11

DOH! My brain doesn't work past 4pm on a Friday night icon_wink.gif

If you don't use that number to determine servings, but only pricing, I'm still a little confused. Would you then make a larger cake to serve the appropriate amount, but use Wilton's chart to determine price on that adjusted number of servings?

indydebi Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 2:15am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by chelley325

DOH! My brain doesn't work past 4pm on a Friday night icon_wink.gif

If you don't use that number to determine servings, but only pricing, I'm still a little confused. Would you then make a larger cake to serve the appropriate amount, but use Wilton's chart to determine price on that adjusted number of servings?



icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif I know it's confusing but bear with me.

A 10" round cake serves 38. I use 35 as a round number. At my rate of $3/serving, this is $105 for a 10" round.

now .... a client walks in and needs a cake for 25 people. I tell her "I recommend the 10" round ... it will serve 25 to 35, depending on how you cut it. This is based on a serving size about the size of a folded over peanut butter sandwich."

If she says "that'll work", then she bought a 10" round for $105. I did not recalculate the pricing based on 25 guests. I did not recalculate the pricing based on the size of cake THEY planned to cut. I did not go into some big 'ole drawn out speech on how the cake REALLY serves 35 and she's paying for 35 at a rate of $3, blah blah blah. Here's the cake ... here's the predetermined price. Period.

Price is fixed, based on a predetermined serving size .... just like with every food item on the market.

If she wants a bigger cake, she pays the bigger price, based on the predetermined price I calculated, which is based on the wilton wedding chart times my rate.

Have you heard my KFC analogy? icon_rolleyes.gif

SugarBakerz Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 2:53am
post #11 of 11

beanie, as for matching the cc's to the cake shown to get them more creative... you could ice them in white and put the same blue flowers on it. That would not be considered a basic iced cupcake in my bakery, and would hence be part of the specialty iced CC's... i hope that helps you icon_smile.gif I didn't answer this in the pm because I thought it might be helpful to others. I completely agree with indydebi, this to is how I do things. you run into people wanting HUNKS of cake, instead of normal slices like serving charts outline for us, so giving them an example of something similar in size is the smart way to go, be it the PB&J halfie or a block of wood cut to size. This is a smart and beneficial tool, because when a customer sees how small the serving is they more than likely will upgrade to a bit larger to avoid having too little... more cake is better than not enough cake....

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