Urgent! Can Someone Help Me Please?

Decorating By cerobs Updated 18 Jun 2008 , 12:12pm by ThatsHowTcakesRolls

cerobs Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 4:15pm
post #1 of 23

I have a wedding cake order for next week for serving 100 people. she would like for three tier square cake pan. The problem is that I only have set of sq pan 3in. Sizes of my pans are 10x3,8x3,6x3.

22 replies
southaustingirl Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 4:24pm
post #2 of 23

You may have to buy another size pan. I am not that familiar with standard pan sizes or how much they will serve. How about a 12" , 10" and 6" pan???

Sorry if I haven't been much help.

mindywith3boys Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 4:25pm
post #3 of 23

Well, I would give her two options. Tell her that she can add a 12 in tier and pay for a cake that serves 150, or tell her you can make and extra 8 inch tier that will look exactly the same, and keep it in the kitchen. Unless you switch pans and go with odd sizes it's hare to get just 100 with just even square pans.

cerobs Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 4:33pm
post #4 of 23

could someone tell me how many will them pan feed

mindywith3boys Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 4:35pm
post #5 of 23

According to Wilton, (which I like) 10 in serves 50, 8 in severs 32 and you probably won't serve the 6 in but it's 18. A 12 in serves 72.

cerobs Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 5:51pm
post #6 of 23

what if I use 2 8in together giving a total of 114. could think work

cerobs Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 5:53pm
post #7 of 23

do you know the server size for earlene cakes for sq.

mindywith3boys Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 6:57pm
post #8 of 23

I don't know off the top of my head. She uses 2x2 instead of 1x2 (which is plenty of cake if it's 4 inches high) so, you would get even less servings.

cerobs Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:03pm
post #9 of 23

know I was saying what if I use two 8x3 pans which would feed 64.

Laura102777 Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:14pm
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cerobs

know I was saying what if I use two 8x3 pans which would feed 64.




Do you mean stacking the two 8" cakes directly on top of one another, or one being part of the stacked cake and one kept separate?

karensjustdessert Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:21pm
post #11 of 23

Here is Earlene's chart, which I use religiously;

http://earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

leah_s Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:23pm
post #12 of 23

Wedding cake tiers need to be 4" in height. That's the industry standard. Bake two layers of each of your sizes. Don't overfill the pans so you don't have to throw away a lot of trimmings.

A 6/8/10 square, two layers each 2" tall for a total height of 4" per tier serves EXACTLY 100.

The standard wedding serving is 1 X 2 X 4.

10 inch tier = 50
8 inch tier = 32
6 inch tier = 18

mindywith3boys Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:32pm
post #13 of 23

Leah is correct! But make sure that your bride doesn't want to keep her top tier. I find that most do. And if That's the case. I would opt of a kitchen cake.

Laura102777 Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 7:35pm
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Wedding cake tiers need to be 4" in height. That's the industry standard. Bake two layers of each of your sizes. Don't overfill the pans so you don't have to throw away a lot of trimmings.

A 6/8/10 square, two layers each 2" tall for a total height of 4" per tier serves EXACTLY 100.

The standard wedding serving is 1 X 2 X 4.

10 inch tier = 50
8 inch tier = 32
6 inch tier = 18




Leahs, as always, you know your stuff. She did say that her pans are 3" deep. Don't some bakers use a 3" tall cake and torte and fill it, making it 4"?

leah_s Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 8:00pm
post #15 of 23

Laura - yes I have seen some of our local bakers do that and I know others do as well. If a 3" tall tier is torted into three layers, I think you'd get pretty close to the standard 4" height.

PS, I hate those 3" deep pans. I gave all mine away!!

PPS, Very few of my brides keep their top tier, as I give them a gift certificate for an anniversary cake!

Laura102777 Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 11:41pm
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Laura - yes I have seen some of our local bakers do that and I know others do as well. If a 3" tall tier is torted into three layers, I think you'd get pretty close to the standard 4" height.

PS, I hate those 3" deep pans. I gave all mine away!!

PPS, Very few of my brides keep their top tier, as I give them a gift certificate for an anniversary cake!




Thanks, I thought I had seen people on here talking about doing that. I've never used 3" pans and never had any desire to. I've found that the deeper the pans I use, the more likely I am to end up with dry, overdone cakes. I'm more than happy making two 2" layers.

cerobs Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 10:57am
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Wedding cake tiers need to be 4" in height. That's the industry standard. Bake two layers of each of your sizes. Don't overfill the pans so you don't have to throw away a lot of trimmings.

A 6/8/10 square, two layers each 2" tall for a total height of 4" per tier serves EXACTLY 100.

The standard wedding serving is 1 X 2 X 4.

10 inch tier = 50
8 inch tier = 32
6 inch tier = 18




So I need to buy a set of 2" pans instead of 3" pan. I just brought the set.

cerobs Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 11:09am
post #18 of 23

So you are said that I need to stop using 3" pan and only use 2" pan for wedding cakes. The only problem is that I just brought the set and the wedding is next week. So I don't know what to do at this point because I can not buy another full set and there no place in town to buy a set or a pan. Please help me!

2sdae Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 11:35am
post #19 of 23

just use the 3 inch pans. Bake 2 of every size you have, 10, 8 and 6 and fill. There will be plenty of cake and the 3 inch v/s the 2 inch is strictly a personal preference. No one is saying dont use the 3 inch.
Leah was saying SHE prefers to do it with 2inch pans.
You should check to make sure your Bride doesn't want the top tier to keep. If so bake an extra 2 layer 6 inch same icing and cake as others and keep in kitchen to serve along with rest of cake and she can keep the top 6 for later.
If she does that though you'll have to charge her for the extra 8 inch.

Malakin Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 11:40am
post #20 of 23

I use both the 2" and the 3" pans and haven't seen any difference in my cakes as far as dryness (yet!!!). I agree it is a personal preference but when you are crunched for time, and I also live in a small town with no places to buy these items, I would just use the 3", do 2 layers, and it will give you more servings. Then maybe add the extra 6" like 2sdae said.

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 11:42am
post #21 of 23

Calm down! (for your sake...lol) - You have what you need to make this work - you don't have to buy more pans.

Leahs is right - 6", 8" & 10" will serve 100. Just bake them an extra 6" for the kitchen if they are planning to keep the top layer. Now, all you have to do is either:

1) Fill the pans a little over half-way full (but not 2/3) (too much and they will take too long to bake and then burn) - once you fill & ice these they should be pretty close to the 4" high (you can torte or you don't have to)

2) You can fill them to about 1 1/2" and bake 1 set twice so that you have 2" high layers (2 of each) to fill like a normal cake without buying yourself the 2" pan set

I have a total of (icon_cool.gif 6" x 2" pans and sometimes I still have to grab the 6" x 3" pans to help bake - I just fill them to the same level as the 2" pans and level them the same.

Good Luck to you - I know you're nervous with this being your 1st cake but you will do great. I think sometimes when we're nervous we focus on little things that aren't issues. I wish you all the best and if you need more help - Just ask!

Tammi

cerobs Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 12:07pm
post #22 of 23

Thanks ladies!

I will just will have to bake 6 cakes and extra 6in for the bride. But another question this might be crazy but what does torte mean?

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 12:12pm
post #23 of 23

To torte is to have 4 thinner layers of cake with 3 layers of filling or 3 layers of cake with 2 layers of filling. You can do it either way. That's why they say you could just bake (1) 6" x 3", (1) 8" x 3" & (1) 10" x 3" because you could really just slice each of those layers into (3) layers and add (2) layers of filling each layer. That would give you the height of 4" by the time you add the (2) layers of filling & the icing.

If that seems like too much hassle for you then just do what you're planning and bake (2) layers of each. btw - if you have left overs you could also try to make cake balls with the crowns you've cut off. You could give those as an added treat to the bride or keep them for yourself...lol

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