Itemized Billing

Decorating By luelue1971 Updated 17 Jun 2008 , 4:04am by servingzero

luelue1971 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 4:10pm
post #1 of 36

I am doing a wedding cake this weekend and the bride just brought me the final payment. She said the lady paying for the cake wants and itemized statement. What?!?!?!?!?!?

The cake is a 14" , 10", 8" and 6" seperated between the 10" & 8" all over a fountain. All round and buttercream . I'm charging them $385.

Can anybody tell me how to go about this?

35 replies
mindywith3boys Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 4:40pm
post #2 of 36

I would simply figure out how many slices there are and give her a per piece invoice. i.e. $2.53 per slice.

patrincia Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:06pm
post #3 of 36

That's crazy... I would just tell her you don't do that. Each cake is as individual as the next, and each has an individual price. Too many factors involved to itemize.

CristinaB Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:13pm
post #4 of 36

I just had to do this for a cake. I'd already figured out how much each unit of ingredients cost and added it all together for the amount I need of each to make the cake. I did it at cost (it was a favor for my mom), but you should definitely mark stuff up 20% for the effort it's taken to get each ingredient. I only did this exercise so that they knew that the ingredients were expensive and that they were getting a good deal. I added in how much I'd make hourly and they paid me for that. I also made sure that they knew what the market value was of the cake (knowing that they didn't have it in their budget, I helped them out and still made money). It's much easier to do by the serving (and less room for nit-picking by a client), but I had to do this in this instance. I'd try to get away with a serving cost and if she pushes for an itemized cost after than then figure it out.

Good luck!

CristinaB Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:21pm
post #5 of 36

I agree with Patrincia. The reasoning behind my itemization was to show my mom's garden club the deal they got and if they didn't have help from me, how much they would have to pay for it. Not because they asked me to do it.

Serving cost only! Go for it!

sugarplumfairycanada Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:30pm
post #6 of 36

I would do per serving cost only as well. Seems like a strange request but then again people can be really weird. If they persist I would ask them why they need this information. Let us know what happens on this!

awolf24 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:41pm
post #7 of 36

Here is another vote for the per serving price only.

patrincia Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:41pm
post #8 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarplumfairycanada

I would do per serving cost only as well. Seems like a strange request but then again people can be really weird. If they persist I would ask them why they need this information. Let us know what happens on this!




I'm sure the person is requesting this information to make a point about the cost of the cake being high, in hopes that you might offer a discount or something.

Really, I wouldn't offer anything but a simple explanation that there are too many variables to itemize. I wouldn't even say $x.xx per slice.

luelue1971 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:45pm
post #9 of 36

Here's what I came up with. What do you think?


My price for your cake was based on price per serving. I charge you $2.75 per serving for 140 servings. I did not charge for the 6" cake you will save for your first anniversary.



Here's what I came up with as far as costs go:



Ingredients for cakes and frosting $187.52

Disposable items for construction 34.07

Delivery and set up fee 30.00

Labor charge for design work (1hr @ $12 per hour) 12.00
Labor charge for cake construction and decoration (8hr @ $12) 98.00

Fountain & plate assembly rental (items to be returned) 23.41



Normal depost $100 waived in good faith



Total $385

Like I said she just paid me the balance I don't know why she decided to concern herself with this now.

Maybe I should have charged my time for calculating this mess instead of working on cakes.

Thanks to you all.

all4cake Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:52pm
post #10 of 36

No, I wouldn't break it down that far!

I would say something like

"moonlight sonata"(whatever design name)

200 servings x 3.00= 600.00+
fountain rental = 100.00+
stand rental =50+
delivery charge =35 ____________________
785



150.00 to be refunded upon return of rented equipment before 7 days from date of event in satisfactory condition.


OSLT

patrincia Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:53pm
post #11 of 36

Well, you've done more than I would have, that's for sure.

Just keep in mind this itemized list might get around, thereby setting your prices for you.

Act1Events Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:55pm
post #12 of 36

its totally up to you, but the more info the more they can come back and complain bout.

i had a customer who ordered a half sheet cake and wanted it itemized!
so i put

1/2 sheet cake vanilla, van. bc xx.xx
edible image xx.xx
tax x.xx

I didnt put the board, foil, box or anything like that.

I told her I don't usually itemize. Before placing the order she wanted to know why i was quoting her a higher price than the price on my site. I told her the sheetcake price on my side is WITHOUT AN EDIBLE IMAGE. Hence the higher price. She was a nightmare!

I suggest you do the per serving amount. And if you are delivering and didn't charge for that state that on the invoice that you waived the delivery fee too.

Act1Events Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:58pm
post #13 of 36

its totally up to you, but the more info the more they can come back and complain bout.

i had a customer who ordered a half sheet cake and wanted it itemized!
so i put

1/2 sheet cake vanilla, van. bc xx.xx
edible image xx.xx
tax x.xx

I didnt put the board, foil, box or anything like that.

I told her I don't usually itemize. Before placing the order she wanted to know why i was quoting her a higher price than the price on my site. I told her the sheetcake price on my side is WITHOUT AN EDIBLE IMAGE. Hence the higher price. She was a nightmare!

I suggest you do the per serving amount. And if you are delivering and didn't charge for that state that on the invoice that you waived the delivery fee too.

FromScratch Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 5:58pm
post #14 of 36

I'd not spell out the ingredients for the cake. Give your per serving price for the cake, the fountain charge and delivery and set up.

That's as itemized as I would get. What they will see is $187 for the ingredients and you are charging them almost $400.. not that it's not worth it, but you know how customers can be.

nicolepa Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 6:01pm
post #15 of 36

Personally it is no ones business but my own what my costs are. Unless I'm charging them by the hour then they don't need an hourly rate either.

It doesn't matter whether it costs $5 or $500 in supplies. They only need to know what your price per serving, delivery and any extra cost (ie gumpaste, fondant decorations etc).

all4cake Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 6:02pm
post #16 of 36

I wouldn't state sizes and I would definitely put a design name or number with it so later should someone approach you with "soandso got her cake for only...." you can say, "well, that was for that particular design". Unless, of course, all of your designs run the same price if they're the same size.

I just wouldn't break it down as far as you have posted....

ain't no one's business what your supplies cost. Nor your rate of pay....most companies reprimand and sometimes let their employee's go for discussing or letting their ROP be known.

CakeDiva73 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 6:11pm
post #17 of 36

No way would I break it down like that. You don't owe these people anything. I agree with quoting the $2.?? per serving plus deposit or delivery fee/tax. I think breaking it down is going to raise questions with problem clients...

'Well how can it cost that much for ingredients? Where are you shopping? Blah, Blah, Blah...." I feel like it is YOUR business and you don't have to spell a darn thing out. And it frosts me when people are kind enough to do a cake for cost, only to have the person request a breakdown of the costs?? So strange and greedy......

worldofdan Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 6:21pm
post #18 of 36

I have to agree with the other ladies - I would break it down per slice - the 14" cake has x amount of slices and costs this much, etc.. then it is $x.xx for the fountain, $X.xx for the delivery, $x.xx for flowers...

jennifer7777 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 6:39pm
post #19 of 36

I wouldn't itemize either. But if you do, which from your last post seems like you did, I would do per serving charge, plus the charges for delivery, fountains and other base price/flat rateextras. Then I would give them the new balance that they have of an extra $50.00 (which would be your hourly rate for ACCOUNTING) icon_confused.gificon_cool.gificon_razz.gif

LeanneW Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 7:23pm
post #20 of 36

Ummmm, have I missed something here?

THE CAKE is AN ITEM.

here is your itemized receipt:

Cake: $385.00

total: $385.00


maybe you could seperate tax if you charged it or delivery as a seperate expense but as far as I see it you only sold one item, even though it had seperate components.

when you buy a shirt it doesn't list
thread: .50
buttons: 2.50
fabric: 10.00

mindywith3boys Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 7:37pm
post #21 of 36

LOL!! Too funny!! I love it! Per slice! and that's it!

mindywith3boys Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 7:38pm
post #22 of 36

Would they ask the pastor to itemize per word how much he's charging to officiate? LOL

johnson6ofus Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 7:53pm
post #23 of 36

lol.... cake $385.00 perfect!

Maybe she just wants a "reworded" agreement--- "Buttercream iced chocolate cake with bavarian cream filling. One 14" layer, (approx XXX servings), fountain rental, delivery and set up.

Paid in full, pending return of _______________ items.

gottabakenow Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 7:55pm
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by leannewinslow

Ummmm, have I missed something here?

THE CAKE is AN ITEM.

here is your itemized receipt:

Cake: $385.00

total: $385.00


maybe you could seperate tax if you charged it or delivery as a seperate expense but as far as I see it you only sold one item, even though it had seperate components.

when you buy a shirt it doesn't list
thread: .50
buttons: 2.50
fabric: 10.00




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

indydebi Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 10:53pm
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicolepa

Personally it is no ones business but my own what my costs are. Unless I'm charging them by the hour then they don't need an hourly rate either.

It doesn't matter whether it costs $5 or $500 in supplies. They only need to know what your price per serving, delivery and any extra cost (ie gumpaste, fondant decorations etc).




AB-SO-FREAKIN'-LUTELY AGREE!!!!!!!!!!

Cake: 100 servings x $3/serving = $300
Add any tax, delivery, etc.

People who specifically ask for "itemized" bills for "just a cake" are just hunting for something to complain about.

dawncr Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 11:13pm
post #26 of 36

Totally agree with everyone. However, I just had a thought----

Was the cake for something other than a personal occasion? Will the person paying for the cake and requesting an itemized bill be reimbursed by a company or organization? If so, some accounting departments *require* an itemized bill. I know I won't be reimbursed if I purchase a good or service that has only 'total' price on it.

My controller's office is militant about that requirement, and it may be some sort of state/federal necessity. For instance, a total bill for $385 could be the cake for her organization *plus* a birthday cake for her child. If that's the case, a less specific itemization may be required.

Not trying to disagree. I thought the same thing everyone else did: She's just looking for justification of what she perceives to be a too-high price. However, the explanation may be more benign.

luelue1971 Posted 16 Jun 2008 , 11:27pm
post #27 of 36

No its just for a wedding cake. I am also doing the grooms cake but that is being paid for by the groom's mother ( a good friend of mine). The wedding cake is being paid for by the groom's paternal grandparents.

My agreement per the signed contract is with the bride. I can't understand why this is an issue as I have now been paid in full.

I told the bride I would leave the bill -receipt with the cake when I deliver it.

soygurl Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 1:59am
post #28 of 36

Well, at the bakery I work at we have a certain price for a "basic" wedding cake (diff. prices for diff. sizes obviously), but then on our invoice we itemize all the extra charges:

6", 8", 10" cake.................................. $x.xx
Fresh Fruit filling..................................$x.xx
Fondant..............................................$x.xx
Sugar flowers.....................................$x.xx
total.................................................. $x.xx

Delivery & Set-up to XXX location.........$x.xx

Refundable Equipment Deposits
Cake stand/mirror..............................$x.xx
4 pillars.............................................$x.xx
2 plates.............................................$x.xx

Total Due...........................................$x.xx

I don't think that's at all unreasonable!

But I guess if you price each cake totally individually with no "set" prices for certain designs/extras, and if you include delivery,or whatever, that would make it much harder to itemize.

ugetsnun2 Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 2:23am
post #29 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by leannewinslow

Ummmm, have I missed something here?

THE CAKE is AN ITEM.

here is your itemized receipt:

Cake: $385.00

total: $385.00


maybe you could seperate tax if you charged it or delivery as a seperate expense but as far as I see it you only sold one item, even though it had seperate components.

when you buy a shirt it doesn't list
thread: .50
buttons: 2.50
fabric: 10.00




Too funny but soooooo true!!!! icon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gificon_lol.gificon_biggrin.gif

ziggytarheel Posted 17 Jun 2008 , 2:45am
post #30 of 36

When someone else is paying the bill, it is hard to guess exactly why they might want an itemized invoice.

They might have an agreement that they will pay for "cake only" and any extras need to be paid by someone else.

Or, they might just be receipt happy people. I know some of those.

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