Help! Awsome Cake Balls

Decorating By ashcake Updated 12 Jun 2008 , 2:28am by SueW

ashcake Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 3:20pm
post #1 of 18

I tried making my first cake balls last night. I used cake added icing and rolled in melted chocolate. I didn't really like them. I read the other day on a forum about someone that made cake balls. She says that they are gone in like 10 minutes. I thought I saved the post, but I guess I didn't. Does anyone have a great cake ball recipe? I'm going to try some more tonight. Do you put them in the fridge, or do you leave them sitting out? I would appriciate any advice or recipes. [email protected]

TIA! icon_biggrin.gif

17 replies
kerri729 Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 3:33pm
post #2 of 18

I am not sure where I got it, but I have a whole list if flavors and suggestions for cake balls- I recently started making these with my cake scraps, and they are gone in no time! I take the scraps, with a fork "cut" them up, so there are alot of fine crumbs, then I add my icing or peanut butter, then powdered sugar, and play with it until I get a "dough like" consistency. Roll them into balls, onto a cookie sheet and into the freezer. After a half hour or so, I melt the chocolate, remove the balls from the freezer and start dipping. My 9 year old daughter is the cake ball expert, she usually starts to make them while I am icing and decorating the cakes. Some of the flavor variations I do are:
Chocolate cake mixed with PB, with milk chocolate coating
Chocolate cake mixed with BC, flavored with mint, chocolate coating
White cake mixed with PB, with white chocolate coating
Chocolate cake, mixed with BC, Kaluha, Chocolate coating
Lemon cake, mixed with BC, flavored with lemon extract, coated in white chocolate.......I could go on- do a recipe search here for cake balls, there are many!

ashcake Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 3:46pm
post #3 of 18

Thanks Kerri. They are suppose to be like a dough consistancy correct?

kerri729 Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 3:56pm
post #4 of 18

Yes, and if they seem a little too sticky, just add some powdered sugar, so you can roll them in your hands easily. My coworkers are wondering when I am bringing more in because they know I have some scraps from the TT cake I carved this past weekend- I have not had time to make them, but they are to die for!

abslu Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:16pm
post #5 of 18

I made some cake balls for a spa/bridal shower I went to. We needed bite size food, so I thought cake balls would be perfect. I used chocolate cake, and chocolate frosting. I crumbled up the cake, mixed in the frosting, and dipped them in powdered sugar, then put them in the fridge. Then, I re-dipped them in more powdered sugar the next day after taking them out of the fridge (they got a little sticky overnight, and I figured more powdered sugar wouldn't hurt!!! icon_biggrin.gif ). . . . I didn't dip them in any chocolate. They were SO yummy!!!

bonnierubio Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:21pm
post #7 of 18

i've tried cake balls and didn't like them, I thought they were too doughy . So how do you know when to stop adding moisture? and do they stay doughy? Does it taste like eating a chocolate covered dough ball or what should it be like? I really want to figure this out so all my cake scraps don't go to waste! thanks!

ashcake Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:22pm
post #8 of 18

Thanks everyone!

shisharka Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:47pm
post #9 of 18

In the ones I like the best, the only ingredients are chocolate cake and Kahlua or Chambord. Just enough of the liquor so the cake can be sort of kneaded and rolled into balls. Dip them in dark chocolate after chilling first and/or roll in roasted shredded walnuts, almonds or hazelnuts. I never use powder sugar on cake balls, just donât like powder sugar in general. Iâve made balls out of vanilla cake and a small amount of SMBC, Iâve thrown in some raspberry puree in lieu of liquid in chocolate cake ones, Iâve mixed in the roasted nuts with the cake (not just for coating)⦠anything works, and taste-testing is my one and only recipe when it comes to cake balls. Just have fun with them icon_smile.gif

Edited to add: I also sometimes add a little bit of softened butter, it helps solidify them in the fridge better, and you can never go wrong with butter on cake icon_smile.gif

tobycat Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 4:48pm
post #10 of 18

I've really gotten cake balls (I call them truffles) down pat. They taste delicious and are truly the hit of any party. They also come out looking very professional. You can see some examples in my pictures (I posted them because I found a great way to ship them in the Costco egg carton). But, I'll be happy to share my process with you if you want. It's just too lengthy to put here on the post. Pm me if you want some indepth instruction. icon_smile.gif

S.

tonedna Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 5:01pm
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonoma9

I've really gotten cake balls (I call them truffles) down pat. They taste delicious and are truly the hit of any party. They also come out looking very professional. You can see some examples in my pictures (I posted them because I found a great way to ship them in the Costco egg carton). But, I'll be happy to share my process with you if you want. It's just too lengthy to put here on the post. Pm me if you want some indepth instruction. icon_smile.gif

S.




Share your process...feel free.. icon_wink.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

ashcake Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 5:05pm
post #12 of 18

I really appriciate everyone helping! I love all my CC friend! I can't wait to get home (at work right now, oopsicon_smile.gif ) and try some of these out. Can't try the ones with alcohol (no one in the family but us drink) but I might try some for my husband and me!

michellesArt Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 5:11pm
post #13 of 18

have you ever heard of Bakerella? she was on martha and makes the cutes cakepops-just don't add the sticks and you have the balls-they are soooooo cute!! she uses cream cheese and icing (if i remember correctly) i have yet to try them but she was on martha so they have to be awsome. i'd think you could add whatever flavour whether cake or icing. good luck!

Ironbaker Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 5:26pm
post #14 of 18

I started using the recipe Cookieman posted here in the forums about 3 years ago (gosh time flies!) and always use a process similar to this:

Quote:
Quote:

I added the amaretto to the crumbled pieces of leftover chocolate cake I had on hand. I just winged the recipe from what I remembered of other recipes I have tried. In a bowl, I crumbled up about a cup-and-a-half of cake, mixed in a couple of tablespoons of confectioners' sugar, a healthy shot of amaretto, and some chopped almonds. I then mixed the whole thing with my very clean hands until it held together. The trick is to not let the mixture get overly moist, but not have it be dry and crumbly either. I then took a tablespoon cookie scoop and made balls out of the mixture. I let them dry out for a while on a parchement-lined cookie sheet (I let them dry for only about an hour, but idealy it should longer; even overnight) and then proceeded to dip them in melted chocolate candy melts. ( I made my own dipping fork by removing the two middle tines from a four-tined plastic spoon.) Then, back to the parchment-lined cookie sheet and into the freezer for 5 minutes to harden the chocolate shell. There you have it: chocolate-covered amaretto balls!




I don't get them exactly "dough" consistency, too much liquid for me. I add just enough so that when I try to form a ball, it sticks and doesn't fall apart. I don't freeze them either but the opposite, let them sit for a little bit - usually I don't even wait. The freezer creates condensation, making them wetter which I don't like.

I also usually stick to liquors, leftover fillings or jams as the "binder".

I hope you get better results if you try again! thumbs_up.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 5:48pm
post #15 of 18

Depending on how moist your cake is, it may only take one to two teaspoons of liquid for the cake to stick. Heck, I made a 9x13 using the Hershey's chocolate cake recipe on the back of the box and for half of that I only needed 2 tsp of peppermint extract. Too much liquid equals mushy cake balls. Ew.

kerri729 Posted 11 Jun 2008 , 7:11pm
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonniedime

i've tried cake balls and didn't like them, I thought they were too doughy . So how do you know when to stop adding moisture? and do they stay doughy? Does it taste like eating a chocolate covered dough ball or what should it be like? I really want to figure this out so all my cake scraps don't go to waste! thanks!




Bonnie,
I only add enough PB or icing or whatever I am using to "glue" the cake scraps together, so it all sticks together- and then add only enough PS, so they don't stick to your hands- similar to putting flour or cornstarch on a board before rolling out dough. I then add a very small amount of flavoring- they taste like truffles to me. Love them!

akrainis Posted 12 Jun 2008 , 2:00am
post #17 of 18

I made some recently for a wedding and they were a HUGE hit. Chocolate cake (made with hazelnut creamer in place of water) with nutella as a binder and dipped in semi-sweet chocolate. They were SO rich but amazingly good.

SueW Posted 12 Jun 2008 , 2:28am
post #18 of 18

I am so jealous of all these great combinations, I just can't see to get them right icon_cry.gif I use cake, icing and dip them but they are total mush!

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