Your Best Recipes For Stacking

Baking By Mommaskip Updated 15 Jun 2008 , 1:55pm by Mommaskip

Mommaskip Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:01pm
post #1 of 14

im curious to know what your best recipes for stacking are. i have made so many different recipes and really have only found one so far that tastes good, is moist and is dense enough to hold up to stacking. can you please share your most successful and tasty recipes for stacking cakes like wedding cakes for example. thanks so much. all flavors welcome i enjoy trying new ones.

13 replies
tatetart Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:13pm
post #2 of 14

You can stack any of your great recipes. the best advice I have is to invest in a set of stress-free cake supports! they are true to their name.
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aswartzw Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:18pm
post #3 of 14

I also agree that you can stack any recipe. The most important thing about stacking is that at no point is the cake supporting any of the next tier's weight. Only the supports are to be holding the weight.

tiptop57 Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:25pm
post #4 of 14

Ohhhhhhh noooooo waaaaaay, you aren't getting my Grandmother's handed down recipes that easily. icon_wink.gif
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Good try though! icon_lol.gif

tatetart Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:30pm
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiptop57

Ohhhhhhh noooooo waaaaaay, you aren't getting my Grandmother's handed down recipes that easily. icon_wink.gif
icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

Good try though! icon_lol.gif




Darnit shirl!! And I had my pen and pencil set to write it all down!! icon_lol.gif

gateaux Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:34pm
post #6 of 14

As I read this all I could see was a stack of recipy cards.

Ok, so I need a nap.

Good Luck

tiptop57 Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:36pm
post #7 of 14

Hey buddy Couturiere

***** icon_wink.gif *****

Mommaskip Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:37pm
post #8 of 14

the chocolate cake recipe i made this past weekend was a 3 layer stacked cake and its very moist, light and fluffy. i put a straw down through the middle to avoid the layers sliding off one another but as soon as the cake was being sliced it began to fall apart. im looking for more dense but moist recipes. like the vanilla butter cake from the mermaid bakery. its dense but moist and yummy.

tiptop57 Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 8:41pm
post #9 of 14

Then any type of pound cake should do the trick for you as they are more dense.

TC123 Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 9:02pm
post #10 of 14

Hi Mommaskip. Like some of the others have mentioned, I believe the important thing is how you support your stacked layers. But I know what you mean about having a really light, fluffy, delicate cake that is so luscious it just doesn't seem to want to stay together! icon_razz.gif

I have never used straws. Maybe it's a "mental" thing, but I just don't feel comfortable with thinking they'd be strong enough. I usually use cake jacks and separator plates. Or if that's not needed, I use a plastic or wooden dowel pushed down the center. icon_wink.gif

Sooooo... I think you should bake your yummy chocolate cake again, but try using a different way to support the layers. About dense cake recipes, the ones I use tend to be butter-based (as opposed to some that just use shortening). Good luck!!! icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2008 , 9:31pm
post #11 of 14

I agree with the above ... any cake is good for stacking since the "cake" is not supporting the upper tiers. It's your support system. The cakes are being supported by your dowels, by your SPS, by your straws, by whatever system you are using. The upper cakes are technically not even touching the lower cakes ... they are touching the supports.

JanH Posted 12 Jun 2008 , 5:44am
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mommaskip

but as soon as the cake was being sliced it began to fall apart.




The "fault" might not be with the cake recipe. icon_smile.gif

Trying to slice a moist cake with a dull/blunt server will not yield a pretty slice - but one that is compressed (not cut) and crumbly or falling apart. icon_sad.gif

To produce beautiful slices, use indydebi's illustrated guide:
(Much better and easier than the Wilton method.)

http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page9.html

Here's a thread that discusses this problem:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-270713-.html

HTH

Mommaskip Posted 12 Jun 2008 , 9:15pm
post #13 of 14

JanH thanks for the info but its not that the slices themselves were falling apart. once a slice was cut from the cake.....the cake itself began to collapse.

Mommaskip Posted 15 Jun 2008 , 1:55pm
post #14 of 14

thanks everyone for replying. i have discovered im gonna stick with box cake mixes. everytime i make a scratch cake it falls apart because its so moist. ill keep those for home.

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