Stacked Cakes And Delivery Questions

Business By Trixyinaz Updated 7 Jun 2008 , 11:33pm by Trixyinaz

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:40pm
post #1 of 21

I've heard so many different ways of doing this.

1. Decorate, don't stack, transport, stack at location

2. Decorate, stack the bottom 2 cakes, transport, stack the remaining cakes at location.

3. Decorate, stack and transport.

icon_cry.gif

I have to travel about 40 miles with a 3 tier cake on Saturday. I've never done this and I'm petrified!

The bake shop I went to last weekend said they do it like #2. When I asked if they drive a center dowel in their cakes for added stability, they said "NEVER" and they've never had a problem with a cake shifting. When they get to the location, they add the additional layers and do the touch ups.

Then on Ace of Cakes the other night, they assembled a 3 teir stacked cake, threw it in the back of their SUV and delivered it that way.

How do you deliver stacked cakes? And, if you stack them at your location, when do you get there and start setting up. The reception starts at 3:00. Should I get there at 1 or will that be too much time in advance. I'm still not very fast at decorating so I want to allow enough time.

Also, I'm adding ribbon around the cakes. Would you add the ribbon before you assemble or after? I need to add little dots above the ribbon on all 3 cakes so I worry about having enough time to do that all at the location.

Any advise is greatly appreciated!

20 replies
missmeg Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 4:03pm
post #2 of 21

I've done all three, depending on the support system.

For cakes with more than 3 tiers, or with columns of any kind, I'll transport them all separately and stack on-site.

For small 3 tiers (6/8/10) I'll stack all together, drive a dowel through, and transport directly there.

I did a large cake last weekend with columns between the top and middle tier. For that I stacked the bottom two (16/12) and assembled the top 8" on site.

So...all three are acceptable depending on the situation.

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 4:36pm
post #3 of 21

Miss Meg, thanks! This cake is also a 6/8/10. For someone never transporting a stacked cake, what would you recommend.

missmeg Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 4:43pm
post #4 of 21

If you've never transported a stacked cake, I'd do them all separately. Stacked cakes are H.E.A.V.Y. - heavier than you realize. Even a 6/8/10.

Bring a tool kit to finish any borders after stacking. If you have one, also bring a heavy-duty metal serving spatula for helping to stack. I always double my cakeboards for extra stability.

When possible, I steer my clients towards separator plates and columns of some kind - easier for transporting separate tiers, and easier to put the cake together icon_wink.gif .

SweetConfectionsChef Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 5:46pm
post #5 of 21

I've taken ONE cake that I had to finish to a venue...I'll never do it again! People were watching (very distracting) I couldn't turn the cake like on my turntable, I was nervous, the whole thing IMO sucked. After that I decided I will only do stacked cakes and they will be completely finished before I leave my shop! Works like a charm! Yes, they are heavy but that's what a $40 cart from Sam's Club is for! I do use a piece of non-skid mat (about 6X6 size) under the cake during transport and I have a Caravan so the back is flat...but I've also put cakes in front floor boards with the mat if the customer is picking it up. I also do use a dowel down the center. This works perfectly for me! thumbs_up.gif

P.S. I arrive about 1 hour prior so the florist has time to set up her stuff and then I usually use her left overs to do the cake table.

KHalstead Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 5:57pm
post #6 of 21

so far I've done two wedding cake a topsy turvy 6,9,12 and a round 6,8,12..both I delivered fully assemled. the 6,8,12 was fine...I just popped the topper on and left! The topsy turvy one had more issues because the venue was about an hr. away and 20min. of that drive was up VERY steep inclines and dangerous curves (I didn't know that ahead of time, doh!) I had some touch ups on the TT one but brought my "kit" and was fine and just added topper, flowers, and crystals on wires when i got there. I prefer to stack ahead of time too because like was said before I get soooooo nervous when people watch me and they ALWAYS watch you! I even had the photographer snapping photos of me with the TT one...talk about NERVE WRACKING!! I deliver my cakes in moving boxes, I cut the front panel so it pulls straight down and I can slide the cake out with no trouble. They are a bit heavy, but i feel so much better knowing the cake is DONE and just has to be set on a table rather than still having to put it together and do borders and such AT the venue. I'm too skeered for that!!! lol

missmeg Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 7:11pm
post #7 of 21

I need to purchase a rolling cart - unfortunately, I have to rely on my dad's Dodge 1500 for delivery, which is not always available. I'm terrified of dropping the tiers, so I'd rather put up with people staring while I add trim and border.

johnniekake Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 8:20pm
post #8 of 21

Stacked,dowell rod thru center,refridgerated over nite.

leah_s Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 8:34pm
post #9 of 21

SPS all the way. Easy. Secure. Cheap. It was designed for consumers to move stacked cakes, so you don't have to be an expert to use it!

pianocat Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 8:37pm
post #10 of 21

I haven't tried the SPS that Leahs refers to, but I will. I have done as many as three tiers stacked with supports and dowels. Drove to Orlando from here-about 1 hour, no problem.

Suzycakes Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 8:52pm
post #11 of 21

Well - I am trying the SPS for the first time next week. I have 2 wedding cakes for the 14th. I hope it goes as smoothly as Leah always assures us it does!

But I don't know that I will be brave enough to stack then transport (since I don't have a cart yet!)
One venue has an extremely long walk and the other one has 3 flights of stairs to take in a building that is over 100 yrs old. UGH! I know there is no way I could handle these cakes for that distance. But one of these days when the distance is flat and short I will try!

tyty Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 8:53pm
post #12 of 21

Does anyone have a picture of the rolling cart from Sam's club? I sure could use one of those. It would be better than carrying cakes or waiting for the kitchen to bring you a cart. I'd like to see it so I know what I'm looking for. I like to transport cakes alreay assembled.

leah_s Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 12:27am
post #13 of 21

OK Suzy, no pressure, no pressure.

You and the cakes will be fine.

Suzycakes Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 1:20am
post #14 of 21

Leah -- That's just what I'm going to keep repeating to myself -- over & over & over . . . LOL!

Suze

Trixyinaz Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 1:23pm
post #15 of 21

Leah - I don't know what the SPS system is. I'll have to do some research for the next time (providing there is a next time icon_wink.gif ).

Thanks suzy for mentioning the 3 flights of stairs. My house is 3 stories and my kitchen is on the 2nd floor. I'd be terrified if I dropped it going down the stairs icon_cry.gif

I've carried this same size stacked cake before and they are heavy, but I think I can do it. Should I just bite the bullet? I don't have a cart, except for my little tuff truck. I'd be afraid to transport it on that once I get to the reception. Oh dear lord....why do I stress over this?
LL

peacockplace Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 3:58pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetConfectionsChef

I've taken ONE cake that I had to finish to a venue...I'll never do it again! People were watching (very distracting) I couldn't turn the cake like on my turntable, I was nervous, the whole thing IMO sucked. After that I decided I will only do stacked cakes and they will be completely finished before I leave my shop! Works like a charm! Yes, they are heavy but that's what a $40 cart from Sam's Club is for! I do use a piece of non-skid mat (about 6X6 size) under the cake during transport and I have a Caravan so the back is flat...but I've also put cakes in front floor boards with the mat if the customer is picking it up. I also do use a dowel down the center. This works perfectly for me! thumbs_up.gif

P.S. I arrive about 1 hour prior so the florist has time to set up her stuff and then I usually use her left overs to do the cake table.




Do you have a pic of that cart? Sounds like something I need!

Trixyinaz Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 4:18pm
post #17 of 21

This is the cart that I think she is referring to. It's a bit more than $40, but we have them at work and this is what all the caterers use when we have events. I wonder if I could borrow one from the office this weekend. I'd have to take my DH's SUV and have it in the back seat so it doesn't crash into the cake in the back....LOL
LL

Trixyinaz Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 4:54pm
post #18 of 21

I just secured the above cart from work and will be assembling the cake tonight and transporting it tomorrow. I am so excited! I can do this, I can do this, I can do this icon_lol.gif

p.s. please let me make it down the steps in my house without falling!

Trixyinaz Posted 6 Jun 2008 , 6:18pm
post #19 of 21

The cart comes apart easily, in case anyone wants to know. It will fit perfectly in my car's back seat so I can confidently place the cake in the back without it getting tinged by a rolling cart (I have a hatchback).

Thanks again for all the information (and confidence) you have given me to do this.

DeKoekjesfee Posted 7 Jun 2008 , 10:38am
post #20 of 21

What is SPS ?

Trixyinaz Posted 7 Jun 2008 , 11:33pm
post #21 of 21

The cake made it in tact. Thanks for the advise! It really helped and it was actually really easy. I'm glad I assembled at home...thanks for the confidence and I didn't even need the cart after all.

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