Baking Ahead - Do You Freeze Or Wrap Tight And Sit Out?

Decorating By jessieb578 Updated 2 Jul 2008 , 5:26pm by malishka

jessieb578 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 1:35pm
post #1 of 50

I'm actually opening my new cake shop next week and I'm having such a huge turn out for my grand opening. I have to bake in advance because I have a wedding cake due the day after the grand opening as well and I'm nervous on how to do this.

I've never frozen a cake. I have baked 3 days in advance, wrapped 3 times in plastic wrap and let the cake sit at room temp and this seemed ok. I'm just wondering what seems to be the general practice of everyone here??

Thanks so much!
Jessie

49 replies
karensue Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 1:40pm
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I always bake and freeze for at least two-three days. I like what it does to my cakes--locks in moisture and firms the crumb some. If I'm doing a wedding, I'll usually bake the week before and put in the freezer and take out the night before I'm ready to level, fill and crumb coat. The cakes are always really fresh and moist.

Cakepro Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 1:44pm
post #3 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by karensue

I always bake and freeze for at least two-three days. I like what it does to my cakes--locks in moisture and firms the crumb some. If I'm doing a wedding, I'll usually bake the week before and put in the freezer and take out the night before I'm ready to level, fill and crumb coat. The cakes are always really fresh and moist.




I do the exact same thing. When wrapped correctly, frozen cakes come out of the freezer just fine and seem to be even moister than before they went in.

jessieb578 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 1:49pm
post #4 of 50

Wow! bake a week before!! I think I may start to do this. I'm nervous being I've never frozen a cake before. What's the best way to do this? Many layers of plastic wrap and then tin foil??

I'm really entering into some unchartered waters with this shop but I'm getting so many orders because I'm the only one in town that I'm going to have to start to do something to get things done ahead of time.

Thanks so much for all of your help!!

mbh724 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:01pm
post #5 of 50

Jessie - how exciting! How about posting some pictures of your new shop - I would love to see them.

Good luck to you!

staceyboots Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:02pm
post #6 of 50

i typically double-wrap in cling wrap, wrap again in foil, and then place in a clean ziplock / plastic bag.

make sure that the cakes have enough room in the freezer to sit flat.

KHalstead Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:03pm
post #7 of 50

I prefer them to be frozen even if it's just for a couple hours (not enough to get rock hard ....but) they come out MUCH more moist.......I 've actually done comparisons over a cake baked the night before, wrapped up tightly in plastic wrap and then heavy duty foil and left out and one wrapped the same way and frozen just overnight, the next morning took the frozen one out and decorated both that afternoon and did the taste test that night and EVERYONE thought the frozen one was WAAYAYYYYYYYY more moist and tasty! Not ONE person picked the fresh unfrozen cake!

Cakepro Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:03pm
post #8 of 50

I double-wrap the cakes with plastic wrap, then wrap in foil (if storing for longer than a week, I use heavy-duty foil), and then I place the cakes in a paper grocery sack, fold the top down, and secure it.

The plastic wrap seals in the cake's moisture, the foil seals out what's in the freezer, and the paper grocery sack absorbs all of the freezer odors that can permeate the cake. If you don't think your freezer has odors, just stick an empty paper sack in your freezer for a day, then take it out and smell it. LOL

jenbenjr Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:04pm
post #9 of 50

I always freeze also.....even if it is for a few hours. It makes the cake so moist. Depending on how long the cake is going to be in the freezer depends on how I wrap. If it is going to be in there for a week, then I wrap in plastic and foil. If it is a day or so, just plastic wrap.

missmeg Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:11pm
post #10 of 50

I'm also a bake-and-freeze girl.

If I have multiple orders going out in a short period, I'll do all my baking on one Saturday, then wrap and freeze for up to two weeks. I triple-wrap in plasticwrap, then place in the freezer.

To unfreeze, I pull the cake out 12 hours before I want to begin decorating, and leave on a cooling grid, still wrapped. DON'T unwrap until it's completely defrosted.

To give you an idea, as of last week I had the following in my freezer:

  • 3 - 11x15 sheet cakes
    4 - 6" rounds
    2 - 8" rounds
    2 - 12" rounds
    2 - 16" rounds
    1 - small hex


I've got four multi-tiered graduation cakes in the next 3 weeks. I label them carefully by client's last name, and date due. Then I just pull as needed.

It works like a charm icon_smile.gif.

jessieb578 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:13pm
post #11 of 50

Wow- general concensus is to freeze! How funny! It seems to me that so many people talk about how their cakes are fresh, not frozen, etc., but I'm hearing now that freezing adds moistness (is that a word?? icon_lol.gif)

mbh724 - thanks so much!! I'll definitely post pics in the next few days. The finishing touches are being done right now, like hanging pics, etc. It's going to be an appointment only shop for specialty cakes and things, not something where you can buy from a case because I stiil work full time! Maybe it will turn into something I can make a living from. It's called
The Sweet Suite - I'll post pics after my grand opening!

cwcopeland Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:20pm
post #12 of 50

I agree with everyone here to freeze. I did an experiment with my cake and buttercream expert (hubby, he loves cake and an expert on bc). I made a "fresh" cake and took one out of the freezer and he liked the frozen one better.

I don't usually tell people I freeze unless they as AND if they've already tasted one of my cakes. Then they can't argue with me that frozen cakes aren't as good.

Marksgirl Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:22pm
post #13 of 50

I have to tell you a little story. I had a 9x13 sitting in my freezer for over a year. Double wrapped then put in a tupperware container. My husband took it out of the freezer this past weekend. I put some frosting on it and told him that I wasn't 100% sure how it would taste. Well to quote my husband "this cake is awesome". It was WASC. So yes I always put my cakes in the freezer even if it is overnight.

Shelly4481 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:38pm
post #14 of 50

I freeze also, and when I have a free day I will bake extras and stick in freezer. They never last long, I always have last minute orders. But in my area it is lots of sheet cakes for b-days. I have a freezer that just has cakes in it except for a few cans of lemonade or something like that.

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:40pm
post #15 of 50

I just did my first bake and freeze this past Sunday. I'm taking them out tomorrow morning before work and will be decorating tomorrow night when I get home. This is for a wedding on Saturday morning. It's nice to hear so many other bake and freeze bakers out there....and I loved hearing the comparison tests too!

When you bake and freeze, do level before you freeze or after you thaw them out? Just curious. I made 6 cakes last weekend with a new recipe and leveled one of the cakes (so I could taste it - I know, bad me), but left the others intact and figured I would level tomorrow night after they thaw. Will I cause damage to that leveled cake by doing it before freezing it?

vdrsolo Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 2:48pm
post #16 of 50

I just recently purchased a freezer dedicated for cakes and I'm a freezer convert as well!! It makes it so much easier to have the cakes already baked, leveled and torted.

I level my cakes, then torte, then place either wax paper or parchment paper between the torted layers. I double wrap in plastic wrap, then wrap in foil.

I take them out just a couple of hours before I start filling and crumb coating. I leave them wrapped, and start with the larger layers first. It's much easier to put the llarge ayers on when they are cold (but not frozen).

ColeAlayne Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:06pm
post #17 of 50

I normally torte, fill and crumb coat prior to freezing. I let the cake sit in in the freezer until the crumb coat is frozen enough cover with waxed paper. I have never left a cake in the freezer for longer than 1 day. The cakes always come out very moist.

aswartzw Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:10pm
post #18 of 50

Freeze! thumbs_up.gif In fact, I just baked a cake, wrapped in plastic wrap and foil, and put it in the freezer the other night for this weekend. I baked my sister's weddign cake 2 weeks prior and froze it and it came out amazing!

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:12pm
post #19 of 50

Thanks! That really helps!

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:13pm
post #20 of 50

I wrapped in about 4 layers of plastic wrap. I didn't foil over that. Will my cakes be okay?

MacsMom Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:23pm
post #21 of 50

We ate the top tier of our wedding cake on our anniversary and it was just as delicious as the day of our wedding. Ever since then I have not been afraid to freeze.

My last cake was put in the freezer for 5 days completely decorated (fondant) and I didn't wrap it at all. My client called and said that everyone wowed over that cake! It was dark chocolate with Oreo filling (crushed Oreos mixed into Frostin Pride with a pkg of Oreo pudding mix).
I never told her it had been frozen, but who tells!

Shelly4481 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:27pm
post #22 of 50

I wrap with just plastic wrap, no foil and they always turn out great.

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:30pm
post #23 of 50

You guys are the best! Thanks for all the tips. And thanks, Mac. I've been wanting a recipe for oreo filling. I can't wait to try it out!

cvigil Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:33pm
post #24 of 50

Oh my word! I am still new to this whole world of cakes. My cake instructor (she was VERY good at what she did) was so proud of the fact that her cakes are ALWAYS fresh never frozen. I just figured that this was the way to go. I have to say I am relieved to find out different. Thanks guys!

Trixyinaz Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 3:50pm
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvigil

Oh my word! I am still new to this whole world of cakes. My cake instructor (she was VERY good at what she did) was so proud of the fact that her cakes are ALWAYS fresh never frozen. I just figured that this was the way to go. I have to say I am relieved to find out different. Thanks guys!




Yep, I heard the same thing....NEVER FREEZE! I'm glad someone gave me the advise to freeze these wedding cakes and I'm glad to see all these other responses on this thread. It just reinforces what I was told 2 weeks about by Melvira. I'm glad I did freeze now! And since I'm a guest at the wedding, I can't wait to taste the cake too.

ColeAlayne Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 4:08pm
post #26 of 50

MacsMom - You froze a fondant decorated cake??? Wow! I thought if you froze fondant the moisture from thawing would cause problems. Have you frozen other fondant cakes?

frosting111 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 4:44pm
post #27 of 50

When you freeze your cakes,do you fill the centers, stack and crumb coat?..If you freeze individual cakes do they stick to the cake boards when trying to remove after defrosting to stack the tiers?

Is there room for error if you decorate a not fully defrosted cake, say if its still kinda frozen in the center, will it interfere with the icing, cause it to get damp,discolor or sag?

How long should Single layers and Stacked cakes be sitting out to defrost?

I have two major wedding cakes coming up on the same day, it would help bookoos if I could go ahead and bake and freeze them now...and be so much nicer if I can fill and crumb coat them before freezing icon_surprised.gif)

Would LOVE to hear more about the frozen fondant cake, I didn't know you could freeze or refrigerate fondant covered or fondant decorated cakes, I thought condensation would destroy it!!!

Talk about a revolution if this can be done safe and effectively!!!

What a helpful thread this is and perfect timing for me indeed icon_surprised.gif)

ColeAlayne Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 5:04pm
post #28 of 50

I do fill, stack and crumb coat then freeze. Make sure you take the frozen cake out about 4 hours before decorating. You want the cake to be at room temperature before finishing.

I did a bc filled cake covered in fondant once that was a little frozen in the middle. The filling oozed out while setting and I could see the line through the fondant covering.

frosting111 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 5:15pm
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColeAlayne

I do fill, stack and crumb coat then freeze. Make sure you take the frozen cake out about 4 hours before decorating. You want the cake to be at room temperature before finishing.

I did a bc filled cake covered in fondant once that was a little frozen in the middle. The filling oozed out while setting and I could see the line through the fondant covering.




Thanks for your reply...

How do you wrap your cakes, and how long should they cool before wrapping?

Do the cake boards get damp, or loose thier firmness after freezing a cake on it?

After reading this thread, I think I'll bake both wedding cakes and freeze them next week and make all the icing too..it will sure take some of the stress off me the week of the 28th.

Again thanks for your reply,Mary

jessieb578 Posted 5 Jun 2008 , 5:27pm
post #30 of 50

Ohh super question Mary - what about the cake boards? Do they get mushy or lose any of their strength?

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