Serving Sizes Not For Weddings--Anybody?

Decorating By death_by_frosting Updated 3 Jun 2008 , 6:17pm by death_by_frosting

death_by_frosting Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:09am
post #1 of 24

I use my round and square pans a lot for birthday parties and such. Does anyone have a good chart for serving sizes for these pans. I use 2" deep pans and always use two layers. My family and friends expect to be served a much larger piece of cake than at a wedding. We are all big eaters around here. I have no problem coming up with a serving size for my sheet cakes but anything after a double layer 8" round, I'm lost and always feel like I'm guessing. Finding wedding serving guides are easy but regular size piece guides have proven to be a challange. Should I just divide my wedding servings by half?

23 replies
ladyonzlake Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:18am
post #2 of 24

If you have never served your stacked or tiered cakes I highly recommend doing it! I made a large stacked cake for my daughters cheer banquet and the Wilton "Party" serving sizes said it should serve 100. With the help of my husband I cut and served 150 out of this cake.

It was a square cake and I cut 1" x 2" x 4" slices which turned out to be very LARGE serving sizes. I have some "dummy" cakes, square and round so I went and measured them out and that is now what I use for a guideline for my serving sizes.

KoryAK Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:28am
post #3 of 24

Well, cut a piece of cake for whatever you would like to call your serving size and measure it. Say, 2x2x3" which is 12 cubic inches (2 x 2 x 3=12). Then you can easily figure out the volume of the pan and divide it by the volume of your serving. Pan volume formula:

3.1415 x r squared (radius is half the diameter) x height

ie: 6x2" cake

3.1415 x 3 squared x 2
3.1415 x 9 x 2
56.547

56.547 divided by 12 (volume of serving) = 4.7 servings.


another: 12x4" cake
3.1415 x 6 squared x 4
3.1415 x 36 x 4
452.376

452.376 divided by 12 = 37.7 servings.


you can easily substitute any serving size you want into that equation to get a count you are comfortable with.

death_by_frosting Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:35am
post #4 of 24

Thanks ladyonzlake. I usually don't get to cut the cakes. Either they are sent on with whom ever ordered the cake or when I am present I always seem to get pushed out of the way with the older ladies at the event telling me that they can take it from here. I shut my mouth and find something else to do. I've done enough cakes that I shouldn't be in the dark on this. It's rather embarrassing. It would be awhile before I could figure out serving sizes though experiance alone.

indydebi Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:41am
post #5 of 24

HOpefully, if you are planning a cake with 2x2x4 piece servings, then you are charging DOUBLE your wedding rate for it, since they are getting twice the amount of cake in each serving.

My view is it doesn't matter. My pricing is based on a 1x2x4 serving size .... they are welcome to cut it any size they want. If they plan to cut it twice the size, they will have to order twice the cake.

I am NOT getting put in the position of having to explain pricing differences on the same 10" round cake.

And it's easy to explain: "My 10" round, 2-layer cake is $70 and will serve 25-35, depending on how you cut it. Here's how you cut it ...." (and then show them the page on Debi's website on How To Cut A Cake).

Ever order a bucket of KFC chicken??? icon_rolleyes.gif

death_by_frosting Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:45am
post #6 of 24

WOW KoryAK! I first look at your post and thought "oh no, not math, I won't even follow this." But you made it very clear. I've got it now!!! Wish you were around during highschool algebra. Honstly never thought I'd use pi again. (if that's how it's spelled- ha ha)

ladyonzlake Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:45am
post #7 of 24

I agree with Indydebi and I promise you that a 1" x 2" x 4" is a very healthy peice of cake! My husband was telling me to cut them smaller!

death_by_frosting Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:51am
post #8 of 24

indydebi, I was asking about party sized pieces so I know what size pan to use so that my cake has the right amount of pieces. I then always charge by the size of tier plus any additional charge for more time consumming or most costly decorations. I ones I'm talking about are just one tier double layer. I'm not a money making business. Just for family and friends and friends of friends....
I know what you are saying..it doesn't matter how it's cut in the end...
Thanks everyone! *hugs*

indydebi Posted 30 May 2008 , 2:54am
post #9 of 24

ladyonzlake, I get that all the time at weddings. "Could I get a smaller piece, please?"

I also do lots of observing at family gatherings, birthdays, etc. I cut the cake into 1x2x4 pieces and observe the reactions. It's the perfect size for little kids birthdays (no 5 year old needs a piece of cake the size of brick!). Adults, who usually proclaim to be on a diet!, find it to be just the right size at birthdays, and those who want more are not shy about having a 2nd piece. At Christmas and Thanksgiving type of events, everyone is stuffed with dinner and a 1x2x4 is a nice dessert-size (which is what it's designed to be).

I almost drive my daughter nuts after the parties, asking her what she observed and what her neighbors said about the cake size, etc. Her observations are the same: Everyone is totally happy with the 1x2x4.

I'd much rather someone take a second piece, than throw out a bunch of half eaten pieces of cake that was wasted by a 5 year old.

toodlesjupiter Posted 30 May 2008 , 3:34pm
post #10 of 24

Inydebi- what if you have an aunt who ALWAYS does the serving of desserts, cutting the cake. (She will cut a big whole in the center if that's the piece a kid wants. She also cut much larger pieces than anyone needs.) My uncle is getting married and i'm doing the cake as a gift... it's going to be for 60-75 people. How do I figure out a safe amount of cake to make?

Sorry to hijack the thread. icon_redface.gif

TexasSugar Posted 30 May 2008 , 5:46pm
post #11 of 24

Have you checked the Wilton Yearbook? They have both party and wedding servings.

indydebi Posted 30 May 2008 , 5:51pm
post #12 of 24

Toodles ... you stand next to her and tell her she isn't cutting the cake right! icon_lol.gif Or if you're like me, you kinda scream out "OH MY GOD WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO MY CAKE????" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

But really .... if someone always cuts the cake badly, why does everyone let her continue to cut the cakes? The answer of "but she always does it" would illicit a response from me of "but she always does it WRONG!"

(Tact is not my forte!)

Seriously, years and years ago, I had a bride who wanted her best friend to "help" with the cake by cutting it. As she laid the knife on the cake, I said, "You need to move that knife in for a smaller piece .... smaller .... smaller..... smaller .... smalller .... smaller .... THAT'S it!!" She said, "The bride doesn't want these cut really small." I said, "We're NOT cutting them really small. But I'm sure the bride wants ALL of her guests to get a piece of cake. THey are welcome to come back for seconds, once everyone has gone thru the line."

toodlesjupiter Posted 30 May 2008 , 6:03pm
post #13 of 24

LOL Indydebi!!! Maybe I'll just have to grow some b*lls and do it myself. icon_wink.gif

mbelgard Posted 30 May 2008 , 6:44pm
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyonzlake

I agree with Indydebi and I promise you that a 1" x 2" x 4" is a very healthy peice of cake! My husband was telling me to cut them smaller!





My husband agrees that it's plenty big enough too (unless it really is your meal) and he has a couple hollow legs. icon_lol.gif

toodlesjupiter Posted 31 May 2008 , 5:25pm
post #15 of 24

So, if there are 60-75 people coming (and I cut it myself), I would be okay doing a 12-10-8-6 with the 6-inch being saved for their first anniversary?

alanahodgson Posted 1 Jun 2008 , 5:55pm
post #16 of 24

12-10-8-6 (Minus the 6) will be PLENTY of cake. PLENTY! I made a 10-8-6 for 60 people and the 6" never even got cut.

toodlesjupiter Posted 1 Jun 2008 , 6:16pm
post #17 of 24

Thank you Alana! I thought it would be, just wanted to make sure with you guys who have more experience than me!

ambernd Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 5:14am
post #18 of 24

Thanks so much Kory for that formula! I have been trying to decide on how to get a uniform serving size for all my cakes and this will work perfectly!

death_by_frosting Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 5:43pm
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

HOpefully, if you are planning a cake with 2x2x4 piece servings, then you are charging DOUBLE your wedding rate for it, since they are getting twice the amount of cake in each serving.

My view is it doesn't matter. My pricing is based on a 1x2x4 serving size .... they are welcome to cut it any size they want. If they plan to cut it twice the size, they will have to order twice the cake.

I am NOT getting put in the position of having to explain pricing differences on the same 10" round cake.

And it's easy to explain: "My 10" round, 2-layer cake is $70 and will serve 25-35, depending on how you cut it. Here's how you cut it ...." (and then show them the page on Debi's website on How To Cut A Cake).

Ever order a bucket of KFC chicken??? icon_rolleyes.gif



I'm fuzzy on this, if your price is based on a 1x2x4 then how can you get 25-35 servings out of a 10" double layer? Using the formula that KoryAK provided us, (if I'm using it correctly) that means you would have only 19.6 servings. Not that I don't believe that you can get that many servings cause Wilton boasts 38 servings for a 10" double layer using 2" deep pans. It's just if you base your price off of a certain size, shouldn't that be around the suggested serving size? Can anyone end my serious lack of understanding when it comes to serving size? Thanks a bundle

toodlesjupiter Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 5:54pm
post #20 of 24

Check out Debi's cake cutting instructions on her website.

http://cateritsimple.com/_wsn/page19.html

cheeseball Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 6:13pm
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Or if you're like me, you kinda scream out "OH MY GOD WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO MY CAKE????" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
This reminds me of my grandparents 50th...I didn't make the cake because I was just a kid and not yet a bona fide caker, yet I still knew that what my aunts were doing to that cake was just wrong! The two of them cut slices from these HUGE tiers that were paper thin and so long they were hanging over the edges of the plates and all of the cousins and grandkids just howled with laughter every time someone would walk by with a slice of cake! I can only imagine how I would have hollered if I had made the cake! icon_lol.gif

KoryAK Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 6:14pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by death_by_frosting

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

HOpefully, if you are planning a cake with 2x2x4 piece servings, then you are charging DOUBLE your wedding rate for it, since they are getting twice the amount of cake in each serving.

My view is it doesn't matter. My pricing is based on a 1x2x4 serving size .... they are welcome to cut it any size they want. If they plan to cut it twice the size, they will have to order twice the cake.

I am NOT getting put in the position of having to explain pricing differences on the same 10" round cake.

And it's easy to explain: "My 10" round, 2-layer cake is $70 and will serve 25-35, depending on how you cut it. Here's how you cut it ...." (and then show them the page on Debi's website on How To Cut A Cake).

Ever order a bucket of KFC chicken??? icon_rolleyes.gif


I'm fuzzy on this, if your price is based on a 1x2x4 then how can you get 25-35 servings out of a 10" double layer? Using the formula that KoryAK provided us, (if I'm using it correctly) that means you would have only 19.6 servings. Not that I don't believe that you can get that many servings cause Wilton boasts 38 servings for a 10" double layer using 2" deep pans. It's just if you base your price off of a certain size, shouldn't that be around the suggested serving size? Can anyone end my serious lack of understanding when it comes to serving size? Thanks a bundle




The formulas as worked out were using a 12 cubic inch portion, or 2x2x3". A 1x2x4" portion would be 8 cubic inches and once you change that in the math you get 39 servings.

3.1415 x 5 squared x 4
3.1415 x 25 x 4
314.15

314.15/8=39.26

It is imperative to decide the serving size YOU want to sell prior to doing the figuring. Indydebi and others count 1x2x4" for all cakes all the time (I think). I count 1x2x4" for wedding servings and 2x2x3" for party servings. Wilton's wedding chart is based on 1x2x4" and you will find that the math checks out pretty closely. Matter of personal preference. Hope that makes sense.

death_by_frosting Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 6:15pm
post #23 of 24

Yes, I have and it is a wonderful site that shows how to cut it. I'm having troubles with how many to cut it for. I think I may have figured it out now. I think I was finding the formula for only one layer not for two. Which would double what I was figuring. And if that was my problem, which I'm almost certain, then I should get around 39 servings for a 10" double layer. Super close to what the wilton chart says for a wedding serving. So how does others like indydebi (sorry not trying to pick on you, you've been very helpful) suggest 25-35 servings for their 10" double layer when they are pricing it closer to 40 servings. Indydebi, is 25-35 your "party serving size?"

death_by_frosting Posted 3 Jun 2008 , 6:17pm
post #24 of 24

You beat me to it KoryAK! haha

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%