Hourly Wage?

Business By chloe_52 Updated 29 May 2008 , 7:14pm by indydebi

chloe_52 Posted 28 May 2008 , 7:31pm
post #1 of 12

I applied for a job as a baker/decorator at a shop that is opening up in a few months. When I went in I thought that was all I would be doing so when she asked how much I thought I should be making an hour I told her. She then goes on to tell me that I would be running the shop as she has another job she is busy with and that I would have a helper for 20 hours a week. I now am not sure if I should be making more then I had told her I was expecting which was $12 an hour. Does anyone have any ideas as to how much I should be making roughly an hour?


11 replies
sari66 Posted 28 May 2008 , 8:34pm
post #2 of 12

She asked how much you expected before telling you all that you would be responsible for? icon_eek.gif Sounds to Me that she wanted to lock you into a price then tell you the rest icon_mad.gif
If you want the job then you should ask for much more depending on your experience and if you think you can handle it.

indydebi Posted 29 May 2008 , 11:42am
post #3 of 12

good point, sari. That would be like someone asking "how much for a 10" round cake?" and we give them our basic price, then they ask for it to look like a volcano with a monkey band climbing up the side with chocolate fudge lava coming out of it. Ok.... the dynamics of the job just changed, so the price is going to change! We'd never feel locked into our original price with all of these "oh by the way, I also need ..... " added on to it.

Nothing wrong with saying, "Oh, well then ... the wage I threw out was based on being a decorator. If you want me to ALSO be a supervisor with add'l duties, then we are back at square one."

mamajan61 Posted 29 May 2008 , 11:56am
post #4 of 12

My first thoughts are... would I really want to work for someone that's obviously got a small bit of "sneakiness" in her? I worked for a company that was run by a guy that loved to tell you one thing then suddenly.... the situation completely changed... I was left holding the bag and there was no one there to do the job.... but me! Go figure! Then after about a year... he started playing the same game with his finances and the payroll checks started bouncing...

I really like to work for people who are completely straight up .... There's too much of the underhanded stuff going on now days...

That's just my thoughts... If she couldn't be straight up with you at first... what makes you think this isn't going to be a pattern with her?

Again..... these are just my initial thoughts...

JulissaMyCakes Posted 29 May 2008 , 12:21pm
post #5 of 12

This is a double sword decision.

Go with your feelings. If you are not feeling OK with it... don't go for it. Specially since you have been thru it before... and that's my opinion.

But, if you want to give it a try, talk to her, give her an offer of how much she should pay you as a decorator/supervisor. Be upfront with her and see what happens... hey! it doesn't hurt to try.

FromScratch Posted 29 May 2008 , 12:25pm
post #6 of 12

I would tell her that if she is looking for a manager then you will have to re-think the salary. If you are going to be in supervisory role with people working under you then you should be making a lot more than $12/hour. I'd expect $20/hour or more depending on your location. She is asking a lot of you.. not just to decorate cakes. When things go wrong it will come back on you and you will have to deal with the hassle of underlings. When someone doesn't/can't come in it will be you who will have to do it. Tell her that if she wants a manager.. you are not working for $12/hour.

akgirl10 Posted 29 May 2008 , 6:10pm
post #7 of 12

I completely agree with jkalman, I was about to write the same thing. She probably had a higher amount in her mind, but since you will work fbe for only 12...

She is telling you upfront that she will not be hands on in this new shop she is opening, you need to be fairly compensated, at least $20, plus benefits.

indydebi Posted 29 May 2008 , 6:48pm
post #8 of 12

I dont' want to be a wet blanket here, but $20/hour may be extreme for a supv/mgr in a bakery. I come from corporate america and I know of managers and supvs with much more responsibility that don't make $40,000 a year. I know officers of banks that dont' make that. I know people who manage a high-tech customer service dept of 20+ people who dont' make that much.

Read your local help-wanted ads. You will find LOTS of "manager" positions being advertised that don't pay NEAR $40K/year. I've seen supv/mgr positions that pay less than $15K a year (and that could be why they always seem to have to run a "help wanted" ad! icon_rolleyes.gif )

I'm not saying it's not merited ... I'm not saying the job skill isn't up to $20 an hour. I just want to add a little reality check.

FromScratch Posted 29 May 2008 , 6:59pm
post #9 of 12

It's different out here Debi. I live close to Boston and 35-40K would be average for a managerial role. That's why I added depending where you live. No way I'd be doing all of that for $12/hour.

aswartzw Posted 29 May 2008 , 7:12pm
post #10 of 12

Is it just me but I was shocked at the pay of $12/hr for decorating cakes in a bakery. Unless it's an up-scale bakery, I would think $9.

akgirl10 Posted 29 May 2008 , 7:12pm
post #11 of 12

I'm in Alaska, and I can tell you that 35-40k is perfectly reasonable. Not only are you talking about a managerial role, but also someone who needs to have decorating skills. This lady wants to hire someone to run the biz for her, and that costs money.

indydebi Posted 29 May 2008 , 7:14pm
post #12 of 12

Oh I agree with ya on the location thing and I am sorry I omitted that in my post. ANd when I see the big fancy-dancy job description that makes the job sound like 2nd in command at General Motors, but then they only want to pay under $15K a year .... we laugh and move on, knowing WHY they are always looking for a new manager!

I also see so many recent college grads, who get the hyped-up speech from their professors on how they can walk out the door and land a $100K job with no experience just because they have a degree .... and to watch their little faces as they run into reality checks is sad and humorous at the same time.

I've left more than one job interview where I've flat out told them, "I'm sorry ... it sounds like I have more skill than you're looking for. Thanks for your time."

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