"kitchen" Cakes

Decorating By Ladybug6509 Updated 28 May 2008 , 4:23pm by CoutureCake

Ladybug6509 Posted 25 May 2008 , 5:39pm
post #1 of 21

I don't see how kitchen cakes are less expensive than a regular wedding cake. It's the same amount of cake and same amount of icing that would be used on a tiered cake. IMO they even take the same amount of work. Given that you are supposed to charge for excessive decorations, I just don't see how they are any less expensive.

What is everybody elses take on them?

20 replies
Theresa50 Posted 25 May 2008 , 5:49pm
post #2 of 21

I hope I don't sound dumb when I ask.. what is a kitchen cake? a cake made at home in your kitchen? if so I don't really see why the cakes would be less expensive.. the same amount of time and effort ..cost.. materials.. I wouldn't see why they would be.. a cake is a cake no matter where you make it.. and the cost would be the same.. that is what I think.. hope this helps.. icon_smile.gif

Ladybug6509 Posted 25 May 2008 , 5:56pm
post #3 of 21

For a wedding a cake that is a simple sheet cake that is cut in the kitchen is what a kitchen cake is. Supposedly brides order a smaller wedding cake and then enough kitchen cakes to feed everyone in an effort to save money.

tonedna Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:04pm
post #4 of 21

Well..the quality of the finish doesnt have to be as good.. They have no decorations..and you charge accordingly to the amount of time you put in them.. And..i forgot...you dont have to stack them either!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

aligotmatt Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:07pm
post #5 of 21

They are cheaper to make than a stacked wedding cake... I put it straight onto a cardboard sheetcake board, undecorated, one layer of not so smooth buttercream. 2 layers cake, 1 layer of filling. No dowel rods, no decorations, no color. It way less time consuming and is simply cake to eat. I charge about a dollar a serving less than my regular buttercream price per serving.

Lenette Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:08pm
post #6 of 21

Well, for me I do the kitchen cakes so it will slice just like the wedding cake -4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling. That is so the guests all get the same thing. I charge a little less because I just ice it, I don't take a lot of time to smooth it, no decorations at all usually not even a border. It does save me some time vs stacking a decorating another tier. HTH


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redpanda Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:09pm
post #7 of 21

If the kitchen cake is used, then the main cake may have fewer expensive elements (e.g. hand-made gumpaste flowers) than it would if it were larger.

At one wedding I went to, the display cake was fondant covered, while the kitchen cake was not. The specific bakery used for this wedding charged $1.50 more per serving for fondant than for buttercream. Therefore, with a wedding with 275 guests and a display cake for 125, 150 guests were served the kitchen cakes. Using the kitchen cakes saved a couple hundred dollars. In the big scheme of things, this would not be a huge savings, but I guess they decided where to scrimp and where to spend.

(Considering that in my area virtually everyone peels off the fondant anyway, nobody felt left out by getting the kitchen cake. It still had the same cake flavor and fillings.)

RedPanda

Theresa50 Posted 25 May 2008 , 7:37pm
post #8 of 21

wow I never knew that.. that is really interesting.. thank you for explaining it..

indydebi Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:21am
post #9 of 21

I dont' charge extra for design elements so there is nothing to deduct for a "plainer" cake. A cake with a ribbon wrapped around the base is the same per-serving price as a cake with lots of cascading roses going down the side of the basketweave design. So the fact that I don't have to decorate a sheet/kitchen cake means nothing to me.

Cake for 150: I will bake a 16/12/8 (top tier for anniv)
Cake for 100: I will bake a 14/10/6 (top tier for anniv)

If a bride wants tiered for 100 AND a sheet cake for 50, I actually have to bake an extra cake, so it's more work for me. I'm actually faster at tiers than I am at sheets, so the don't-have-to-tier-it-dowel-it doesn't apply to me. The cake I had today was 3 tiers on acrylic stands .... no tiering or doweling needed, but you can bet they paid my wedding cake price.

It takes no more time to bake a 3-tier cake for 150 than it does to bake a 3-tier cake for 100. So why would I charge less for the extra work of making that extra cake in a sheet cake form? Why would a bride give up that grandeur look if it costs her the same money?

Yes, I know I'm the odd man out on this issue, for not charging extra for design elements. But with the exception of my skyline cake, I've not run into any design that I've done that merits or justifies an extra charge.

And this is why, once I explain it to the bride, that I don't ever have to mess with sheet cakes at my weddings.

vickymacd Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:46am
post #10 of 21

I understand what you are saying! A girl at work that is getting married said she wished she didn't tell the decorator it was a wedding since her cake is going to be simple, but knows the moment she mentioned 'wedding' the price went up!
Then I was in Walmart and overheard the baker tell a guy when he was ordering a graduation cake, not to mention that it's a grad cake cuz the price will go up. But to order a regular cake with the decorations 'like' the grad cakes. Duh, is Walmart that dumb they don't know it's a grad cake when decorating it?
This is only what I've heard so there may be some truth to it.
But on the other hand, I think if I were a decorator, I would put that extra effort into a wedding cake only because it is so special unlike other cakes to me.

pinklesley1 Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:47am
post #11 of 21

i for one hate sheet cakes, that is why i donot even own a sheet pan. and i have never been asked for it.
so i dont do them
what i do alot of is dummy cakes... you know the couple only needs 100 servings but wants a super spectacular cake, so they add a dummy tier on the bottm of a 3 tier 6,8,10 cake.

vickymacd Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:52am
post #12 of 21

pinklesley1~ I was watching Platinum Weddings on TV today and they all cut into the second from the bottom tier. Wonder if they did the same thing?

tonedna Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:53am
post #13 of 21

I charge for the dummy's... specially if the want complicated designs..they can take as much time as a cake..specially if is one of the lower tiers..wish are bigger!
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

pinklesley1 Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:54am
post #14 of 21

usually thats what it is . i mean i did the same thing for my wedding... my cake was enough for 250 people (eventhough i only had 100 guests-and only 90 showerd up) and i still wanted it to be BIGGER ... so i added a 14 inch dummy... it was first time and i was out of fondant and it was 4 am the day before my wedding, so we opted by painting it... and you would never know unless you were up close... the pic is on my pictures...

pinklesley1 Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:56am
post #15 of 21

yeah i mean edna...
i charge too... but not as much as a regular cake.
How much do you charge edna?

indydebi Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:59am
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickymacd

pinklesley1~ I was watching Platinum Weddings on TV today and they all cut into the second from the bottom tier. Wonder if they did the same thing?




When it's time for the cake cutting pic, I ask my brides which tier they want to cut into. Sometimes they pick the tier with their favorite flavor ... sometimes they pick a middle tier simply because it's more comfortable for them (instead of bending over to cut the bottom tier).

vickymacd Posted 26 May 2008 , 3:12am
post #17 of 21

That makes sense!! And of course, it looks prettier in pictures too I'm sure. Sure a far cry from when I got married! They delivered only half the cake and I cut into what I could!! ha, ha.

CoutureCake Posted 26 May 2008 , 7:19pm
post #18 of 21

Here's how it's cheaper to do kitchen cakes than a wedding cake and still make money... A lot of the weddings around here are for 250 guests or more (many times closer to 300-400), the bride and groom want a simple 3tiered cake for their cutting and photos... I don't care who ya're that's one massive slab at the top to feed 250 within those three tiers... I also DO NOT and WILL NOT EVER offer flat pan sheet cakes for weddings and most other events unless it's some special offer like a graduation cake.

Fast forward to the kitchen cake, same number of cake and filling layers, all guests are fed the same sized portion of cake (trust me, as a guest it SUCKS to get those flat pan sheet cakes because it's like the couple cheaped out on us when we didn't cheap out on them for the cost of travel, the gift, frustration of a toddler with no nap, etc.)... BUT, the decorating time I spend on a regular tier of wedding cake from filling to finish is at least 3-4 hours. I'm hyper-vigilent about smooth buttercream if that's what they've ordered (I charge more for smooth buttercream than fondant because it takes me an hour extra...).. O.k. kitchen cake from the first layer of cake to the last bit of frosting placed on it is 20-40 minutes TOPS... O.k.. at a living wage in decorating time value for a $.25 to $1.00 difference per serving that everyone has mentioned. I can think of a lot better things to do with that extra time than standing smoothing buttercream.. Also, the kitchen cakes are just rough iced, no smooth icing, no border along the bottom... just slap that icing on just so there's enough that you can't see the cake on the side. Also, there's ZERO stress or brainpower time involved with kitchen cakes so the research time is nill.. THAT time also has a value placed on it.

The profit for using kitchen cakes is the time value. It's also something that a small wedding is not going to make sense to do but when the majority of weddings I do are over 150 and I have a serving size of 1x3x5, those kitchen cakes make my life a breeze and the brides get that "feeling" that they're not getting scr tapedshut.gif ... perception is all that matters from the bride and guests perspective. I'd rather not make .50/serving than be the guest that is stuck with that crappy aluminum pan sheet cake slice wondering "WHERE THE HECK IS MY SLICE OF CAKE!?!?!?!?" I also offer brides the option of the same price for the decoration level of a kitchen cake as the main wedding cake because that decorating time is so minimal. But, no bride ever wants to take me up on that, so oh well, their loss...

Ladybug6509 Posted 28 May 2008 , 12:29am
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I dont' charge extra for design elements so there is nothing to deduct for a "plainer" cake. A cake with a ribbon wrapped around the base is the same per-serving price as a cake with lots of cascading roses going down the side of the basketweave design. So the fact that I don't have to decorate a sheet/kitchen cake means nothing to me.

Cake for 150: I will bake a 16/12/8 (top tier for anniv)
Cake for 100: I will bake a 14/10/6 (top tier for anniv)

If a bride wants tiered for 100 AND a sheet cake for 50, I actually have to bake an extra cake, so it's more work for me. I'm actually faster at tiers than I am at sheets, so the don't-have-to-tier-it-dowel-it doesn't apply to me. The cake I had today was 3 tiers on acrylic stands .... no tiering or doweling needed, but you can bet they paid my wedding cake price.

It takes no more time to bake a 3-tier cake for 150 than it does to bake a 3-tier cake for 100. So why would I charge less for the extra work of making that extra cake in a sheet cake form? Why would a bride give up that grandeur look if it costs her the same money?

Yes, I know I'm the odd man out on this issue, for not charging extra for design elements. But with the exception of my skyline cake, I've not run into any design that I've done that merits or justifies an extra charge.

And this is why, once I explain it to the bride, that I don't ever have to mess with sheet cakes at my weddings.




I do my cakes basically the same way, so I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks "kitchen" cakes are a waste of time. It's much easier for me to just add another tier to their wedding cake. But now that I see how some of you charge I can see where this would be a money saving option for brides. Thanks!

aligotmatt Posted 28 May 2008 , 3:53am
post #20 of 21

I think it's just a matter of what you're talking about. Around here, most people don't do the whole kitchen cake thing to have 100 servings in the stacked cake and 50 in the kitchen, it's more typically 150 stacked and 250 in the kitchen. And really, it is easier than decorating and stacking a 20", 18" 16" 14" 12" 10" 8" and 6".

I had a bride say she read in a mag article that she should get a dummy to appear to serve her 175 guests and then have kitchen cakes, that it would save her money... I told her that even with samsclub kitchen cakes, she won't save money after I make the dummy. silly magazines...

CoutureCake Posted 28 May 2008 , 4:23pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by aligotmatt

I had a bride say she read in a mag article that she should get a dummy to appear to serve her 175 guests and then have kitchen cakes, that it would save her money... I told her that even with samsclub kitchen cakes, she won't save money after I make the dummy. silly magazines...




I have to completely agree here... It's one thing if a bride is renting a wall spackle dummy that's been collecting dust on the shelves for 3 years from the baker for pennies on the dollar in rental then doing the kitchen cakes for the servings, but what they're referring to in these bridal magazines are dummies are custom made with a little "cutout" for the baker to put a slice of cake in to the likes of Margaret Braun and Colette..

I've had a lot of brides say that same thing that they read it's cheaper and it's like an educational moment for them to say, "(insert eye roll), yea, here's where to never believe a bridal magazine... It's the same exact cost of materials for the dummy as it is the ingredients of the cake, but just like you go to work and get paid for your time, so do I, and rather than doing your wedding cakes once, you're paying me to do them twice, and I got tired of working for pauper's wages and my time is valuable. If you want a dummy for display and your pictures for eternity and serve kitchen cakes to your guests, here's what it'll cost you (somewhere between arm, leg and OUCH!), if you want to cut into a real cake on your wedding day for your pictures with kitchen cakes to finish out those servings it'll cost you (about half give or take $20-50 depending on the scale of the main cake)." I don't know why, but no brides have taken me up on having the dummy cake...

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