Sort Of A Disaster . . .what Do You Think?

Decorating By Mamas Updated 27 May 2008 , 4:02am by Mamas

Mamas Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:20pm
post #1 of 19

I absolutely hate this cake. I didn't even take a picture of it with my camera. I used my camera phone at the last minute. It has a million flaws and the thing I hate about it the most is that the colors are waaaaay off. I was going for really pale muted pastel colors not the in your face pastels you see in the picture. I had so much trouble with this cake. My stomach was a wreck. I can't tell you how many times I almost threw up. I was so happy to be done with it that I couldn't sleep I was so worked up.

With that said . . . . . . . I absolutely love this cake. It was my first attempt at a "topsy turvy" style cake and I felt like I was on a food network challenge when we lifted the cake to rest at its final destination because it wobbled a little in my hands- it weighed a ton! The client wanted a whimsical Alice-in-Wonderland-Mad-Hatter style cake and I think I delivered.

Everyone was wowed but they're always wowed. I just wanted you guys to take a look and tell me what you think and offer advice for the second one I will be making.


Thanks for looking.
LL

18 replies
Amia Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:25pm
post #2 of 19

I think it looks great! I don't see any flaws, but we are always our own worst critic, so you might see something no one else has, or will, notice. Too bad there isn't a better pic! I'd love to see it in better color and detail.

poshcakedesigns Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:34pm
post #3 of 19

I think it looks great. Can't see anything wrong.

chutzpah Posted 25 May 2008 , 5:00pm
post #4 of 19

It's a shame you didn't get a photo that you can ever use for anything like advertising.

Mamas Posted 25 May 2008 , 5:30pm
post #5 of 19

thanks everyone.

I think it sucks about the photo too. I just felt so bummed about the cake that I really didn't want to commemorate my disaster but at the last minute thought better of it. It really looks a lot better in the picture.

As for the flaws . . . it is wrinkling on one side because it wasn't adequately supported. I spent tooo much time putting all the supporting dowels on the opposite side of the tilt on each tier and completely forgot about making sure there was enough support for the sheer weight of it all. . . . the scroll work is sloppy, the fondont is cracking in some places, . . . you know the usual ways in which it could go wrong.

psanders76 Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:28pm
post #6 of 19

This cake looks great!! You should be very proud of yourself.

tammycake Posted 26 May 2008 , 12:28am
post #7 of 19

It's lovely, I think the biggest problem is you are being WAY too hard on yourself. This cake is really not making yourself sick over. I hope you feel better.

Scox Posted 26 May 2008 , 1:53am
post #8 of 19

It's beautiful!! Love the little butterflies!

Kate714 Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:06am
post #9 of 19

I think it looks Great!!! thumbs_up.gif

ladyonzlake Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:13am
post #10 of 19

From the photo you gave us it looks GREAT! Did you make it using the tutorial on CC? I made a topsy turvy 50th Anniversary cake and made it like the tutorial but had problems with my dowels so I ended up using the SPS system and it worked like a charm! It was very sturdy! You can get them at www.oasissupply.com or www.globalsugarart.com

ladyonzlake Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:16am
post #11 of 19

Oh, and I have a great tip on how to cut the slant evenly on the cakes. I took a notebook (the slanted ones) and placed my cake on it at the angle I wanted. The I used the large Wilton cake cutter and with it resting level on the counter (remember your cake is at an angle on the notebook) just start cutting straight across and you have a perfectly angled cut in your cake!
LL

ANicole Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:19am
post #12 of 19

Jacqui - great tip! You're talking about those binders, right?

ladyonzlake Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:33am
post #13 of 19

Yes! 1 1/2" or 2" binders. It was my husband's idea and it worked like a charm! icon_wink.gif

Mamas Posted 26 May 2008 , 10:05am
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladyonzlake

Oh, and I have a great tip on how to cut the slant evenly on the cakes. I took a notebook (the slanted ones) and placed my cake on it at the angle I wanted. The I used the large Wilton cake cutter and with it resting level on the counter (remember your cake is at an angle on the notebook) just start cutting straight across and you have a perfectly angled cut in your cake!





SHUT UP! Where were you when I needed you!

No I didn't use a tutorial. I kinda did my own thing. I didn't trust myself to actually cut the cake because the way I saw it I only had one shot and this lady was a little bit of a pain in the butt about things. So when things started going kinda wrong I was really nervous. Not sure if I would have been otherwise.

The other thing that added pressure was the fact that it was for a baby shower. I always have it in my head that if the cake isn't right I am going to totally ruin somebody's happy event (as if friends, family and the occaision don't matter and my cake is the main event). I know it is silly but I have this scene play out in my head that people are standing around angry, shouting crying and pointing and the whole event is ruined because of my mess up. Yes, I KNOW IT IS INSANE!

What I did was leave the cake exactly as it was, straight on top, and cut a cake dummy on a slant attached it to a cake board with a glue gun and then I attached the cake to the cake dummy with royal icing. So that what I ended up with was a wedge between two cake boards and the cake on top. I then covered the whole thing in fondant.

I will definately try the binder method next time though!

ladyonzlake Posted 26 May 2008 , 2:37pm
post #15 of 19

Isn't it funny! We LOVE what we do but it "stresses" us out to no end!! I'm like that too. My husband always says "Why do you do this"? I just love too but I stress out cuz I know they're paying big bucks so it better be a good one!!

You'll do even better the next time you make a topsy turvy. I learn from every cake I do and the next one is always better! I'm sure they lOVED your cake, it really looks great!

ANicole Posted 26 May 2008 , 3:23pm
post #16 of 19

Seriously, Jacqui, your little tip about the binder makes doing a topsy turvey seem possible. I was too scared to try it before. I am going to read up on that article. I want to make sure I know what I'm getting into, especially as far as supports go. But I might just try one soon.

ladyonzlake Posted 26 May 2008 , 3:39pm
post #17 of 19

Oh, one more tip...I place my cake on a cake board and I also use a nonslip pad. You know the kind you put in your drawers so things don't slide around. That way your cake doesn't move while you're cutting.

They're are many ways to stack a topsy turvy but I like the tutorial on here because then you can place your support system "level" (SPS system) on your cake and that helps in the transporting. I transported mine about 15 miles stacked.

Mamas Posted 27 May 2008 , 3:54am
post #18 of 19

I knew you guys would understand. Ladyonzlake you hit the nail right on the head.

I wouldn't allow my son or my husband anywhere near the kitchen for two days. for two days they ate out or waited until I could go into the refrigerator to get them what they were loooking for. He hasn't come right out and said it but I know he thinks I am insane to continue this self inflicted torture but I LOVE IT!

Experiences like this are just gonna make me figure out how to take a class or two. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Maybe the experts can teach me how to do it with less angst.

Mamas Posted 27 May 2008 , 4:02am
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber0717

Seriously, Jacqui, your little tip about the binder makes doing a topsy turvey seem possible. I was too scared to try it before. I am going to read up on that article. I want to make sure I know what I'm getting into, especially as far as supports go. But I might just try one soon.




Make absolutely sure you support the hell out of the bottome tier because it has to be able to hold up two tiers of weight. This was one of my mistakes. The bottom tier of my cake started to buckel a little and I had to lift the top two tiers to try and get some more dowels into the cake to stop the slide. Everyone who saw it thought the wrinkling (after I pointed it out to them) was intentional and a part of the design but it was one of the occaisions where I thought I would pass out.

Anybody have any articles to post or other advice please pass it on. I just found out that I am going to be doing two more of these cake. I think I can do it better this time but . . .

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