Does Everyone Travel With Already Assembled Cake?

Decorating By laurascakedesign Updated 26 May 2008 , 7:24pm by mamacc

laurascakedesign Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:43pm
post #1 of 16

Ok, after reading several posts on different topics, it seems to me that the majority of you gals out there put your cake together at home and then hop in the car and deliver. HOLY CRAP! That scares the bejesus out of me! Not only are cakes RIDICULOUSLY heavy, but I would absolutely crap myself if that thing fell over in the car! In my opinion it is a lot easier to repair a squish on a single layer than try to piece a whole cake together.
So, I'm seeing that there are wonderful ways to keep your cake from wobbling, so tell me how you lift that heavy-a** cake in and out of a vehicle. I'm really curious...
And will someone tell me about straws instead of wood? Wood dowels are what I use, but they always seem so unsanitary to me....

15 replies
indydebi Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:49pm
post #2 of 16

First, wood dowels that are sold in the cake supply section or at your local cake supply store are designed for use in cakes, so they are NOT unsanitary.

I only started delivering some cakes fully assembled in the past few months. I will do no more than 3 tiers, due to the weight. It's about the max I can carry (and I still recall one that had my arms totally numb by the time I set it on the cake table!). Since a number of my cakes are 4 tier, I may transport it in 2 tiers assembled and then put it together at the site.

The dowel down the center really works like everyone says it does. I can even impale a cake with my eyes open and everything! icon_biggrin.gif

I've spent most of my life assembling on site, so it's pretty much my preferred method. I can set up a cake and be out of there inside of 10 or 15 minutes, so assembling it on-site doesnt' take me much longer than just a simple Drop-n-Run.

tonedna Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:51pm
post #3 of 16

I use cardboard or plastic for dowels.. But I still need the wood to hold all my tiers together.
As for lifting I use my forehands...and of course there is a always handy dandy DH if is too much..
Edna icon_biggrin.gif

jammjenks Posted 25 May 2008 , 2:15am
post #4 of 16

I don't make a habit of it, but I have traveled with them assembled on several occasions. Actually, just a week or two ago, I delivered a 5-tier cake assembeled. I was the slowest driver on the road that day for sure!

Here it is:
LL

brnrlvr Posted 25 May 2008 , 3:05am
post #5 of 16

If I can lift it, I try to fully assemble, then deliver. Piss off lots of other drivers! Get the horn a lot! icon_smile.gif

Cool race car cake!! How long did it take to do all the grass?

(sorry, off the subject!)

sugarshack Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:21am
post #6 of 16

assembled all the way.

DH carries and if too heavy we 2 man carry.

and yes, it is nerve wracking on the drive.

MelZ Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:38am
post #7 of 16

I am so glad this topic is being discussed. I have my first wedding cake to do in August. I have been trying to decide if I should deliver it assembled or not. The whole thing really freaks me out. It is 3 tier square cake with no decorations to hide imperfections. There are only going to be fresh flowers in the front of each tier and on the top. Hubby is going with me to deliver it and I am taking a repair kit. It will be delivered on a wing and a prayer. Not looking forward to the drive, I think I'll make a test run to look for pot holes.

sugarshack Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:47am
post #8 of 16

make sure it is level and supported well; drive carefully and you will be fine!

lisa78332 Posted 25 May 2008 , 4:51am
post #9 of 16

The quinceaner cake I did, I delivered in pieces and set it up entirely on site. I also did a wedding cake that was 3 tier, that one, was delivered in one piece BUT had a down straight down the middle. I also bring a repair kit just in case.

jammjenks Posted 25 May 2008 , 12:42pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by brnrlvr

If I can lift it, I try to fully assemble, then deliver. Piss off lots of other drivers! Get the horn a lot! icon_smile.gif

Cool race car cake!! How long did it take to do all the grass?

(sorry, off the subject!)




It took me an hour to do the grass. My right arm was almost numb! Thanks for the compliment. I had no choice but to deliver it assembled. I couldn't decorate until it was carved, couldn't carve until it was assembled, and didn't have time to do all that on site.

ThatsHowTcakesRolls Posted 25 May 2008 , 12:55pm
post #11 of 16

Something else that really helps if you have the space is to refrigerate the cake for several hours to overnight before delivery. It really stiffens the cake and make a huge difference. No wiggling!

Tammi

dee-lite Posted 25 May 2008 , 1:12pm
post #12 of 16

I have traveled once with a 3 tier wedding cake with a dowel all the way through and it was fine but in the future i will put a magnet sign "wedding cake in transit" which I saw for sale through CC to keep the Beepers under control ......

LusciousCakes Posted 25 May 2008 , 6:38pm
post #13 of 16

So is it alright to refrigerate a fondant covered cake? I have my first Wedding cake in August 3 tiers and have to transport it a day ahead one hour drive to the ferry 1 1/2 hrs on the ferry then 1/2 hr to sister in laws place.

Leona

MelZ Posted 25 May 2008 , 9:46pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbroskoski

Something else that really helps if you have the space is to refrigerate the cake for several hours to overnight before delivery. It really stiffens the cake and make a huge difference. No wiggling!

Tammi




So when you do this you don't have any condensation problems when it starts to return to room temperature?

imacook Posted 26 May 2008 , 6:54pm
post #15 of 16

I found that a 2-3" piece of foam (like a foam mattress) works like a charm. You place the cake directly on the foam without a cover. The cake will slightly "give" to the movement of the car. I've done some 3 tiered cakes this way and find it works great.

mamacc Posted 26 May 2008 , 7:24pm
post #16 of 16

I do a lot of sculpted cakes that I deliver assembled since there really is no other way to do it... I also use central dowels or other internal supports and haven't had any problems.

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