Way Off Topic

Lounge By Amanda518 Updated 24 May 2008 , 2:12pm by mbelgard

Amanda518 Posted 22 May 2008 , 1:22pm
post #1 of 32

I am wondering if anyone here knows any good information about advance kids my son is 7 years old and when he was 6 was tested for his IQ at school and he has an IQ of 141 I am not sure where that is on a scale other then He has been placed in a GT (gifted and talented) class and I am just trying to find out as much information as I can about this being he is my oldest and I want to better him in every way I am capable of doing so. I know he has a drive to do big things and be smart I just don't know all of the resources and ways of finding more information.. Any advice would be great..

(I posted this in the general section but no one has replied back so I thought I should try another one.)

I hope someone has some information in this topic, Cool web sites for him to go, where to find books about GT, How to keep him thinking positive about his abilities, anything you can think of .. I would love to read and hear about. Thanks in advance.. thumbs_up.gificon_biggrin.gif

31 replies
costumeczar Posted 22 May 2008 , 1:42pm
post #2 of 32

IQ isn't really stable until age 8 or 9, but the fact that he scored that high shows that he has a higher than average IQ in general. Don't worry about the specific score so much, just give him a lot of opportunity to get into the subjects that he likes. The library is a good place to start, take him and let him get books about his interests and you can get some books on gifted kids at the same time!

PM me if you have more questions...In my pre-cake life I got a Master's Degree in Psych and was working with kids, and both of my kids have been placed in the Gifted programs at school, so I've dealt with the school system and how they handle it for the last four or five years. I don't know how they do things where you are, but it's probably relatively similar everywhere.

smoore Posted 22 May 2008 , 2:13pm
post #3 of 32

I'd just have him read as much as possible (I have a set amount of time the kids have to read at home during the school year and an even longer amount they have to read during the summer). I think at that age kids will absorb a lot, so reading will help them broaden their vocabulary and understanding of different things. I also think that the important thing for kids is that they are allowed to be kids for as long as they can (they are growing up too quickly these days) and that they get a lot of social interation with a lot of different age groups (nothing like being brilliant, but not able to interact with others, right?). Make sure he gets a good amount of play time -- he won't always have that. As long as you support him, he'll excel. Gifted programs are generally geared to work with your child so they always remain challenged and that's great! But they also need time where there's no challenge and they can understand their worth isn't reliant on moving up to the next level -- just them being there is priceless.

Amanda518 Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:54pm
post #4 of 32

Thanks so much on the advice and information. Ive had to deal with a few things like them wanting to move him up a year but I went against that. He is smart but he is such a goofy goofy kid I know he is to immature right now to be moved around in grades. I don't think that would ever be an option unless he scored real high in middle school or something but right now with him only being in 1st I don't think its a good idea right now.

I am big on him being a kid I don't want him to feel like because hes smart he has to be like an adult. Which is weird because when he was younger and did not realize how other kids acted he was so so well mannered lol now he is a goober which is fine but sometimes I miss how he use to act but I don't want to push that one him since hes not getting in trouble or doing anything but being silly I don't see where I need to be like you better act like this..

Hes a huge reader thats how I noticed he was a little smarter then I thought. He reads books so fast. We just bought him a lot of books from the book fair on Monday and he has almost finished 2 (reading some after school is over and before bed time) One was 220pages this second one is probably around 100 or little more maybe. We are big readers so I try really hard to read to him and show him new words and help him sound things out.

I am just super amazed somethings he uses word that you wouldn't normally hear come out of a 7 year olds mouth and he worries about so many things that he does not need to right now things adults need to worry about. I am just confused sometimes with what I should do I don't want to smother him but at the same time I don't want to neglect the abilities he has. I feel like what if I don't continue to put him in the right opportunities will this above average just go away. i don't want to fail him some how cause I am not as above average. Or because I am not pushing as much as I should.. Oh its confusing. icon_cry.gif

smoore Posted 22 May 2008 , 4:40pm
post #5 of 32

You're being there for him and encouraging him ... that's what he needs at this age. Reading isn't just good for reading's sake and learning vocabulary. They broaden everything from geography, history, science ... whatever they are reading about can teach them something new! That will help him with everything he'll face in school in the future. The only thing I would also suggest there is pre-reading some of the books that your child reads. My daughter is advanced and is now limited in the books from her school library that are at her reading level. There are times that she'll bring a book home that is perfectly fine for her reading level, but the content is for older kids. I have litterally told the school that I will personally buy books for her to read and to be put in the library for advanced readers before I have her reading some books just because it's the only ones left that they have in her level. Classics are great too. And, don't forget those books you and your husband loved while growing up (I loved Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys Mysteries, and now I get to see/read them again!) icon_smile.gif Oh ... one more thing .... I wouldn't make any big deal of the "gifted and talented" class at school with him ... it's just what he needs to do because he's told to go there. I tell my daughter all the time that I expect her to do her best at all times, no matter what class she's in and I'll know if she's doing her best regardless of her grades - it's the effort she puts in that I'm concerned about. I've also tried to teach her the value of time, so if she's done her work, she should look over it again and make sure she didn't miss something. She's got a boy in her gifted class that continually lets everyone in the regular class time know how he's supposed to be in the next grade, how he's always done first (sets his pencil down and huffs and puffs like he's bored waiting for everyone else - "Look at me!"), and basically how he's better than all the other kids. Humility is a good thing! The kids in her class resent the boy that's gifted because he makes them feel like dirt. They don't have a problem with my daughter because she doesn't even bring it up. "Be proud of what you did without making others feel bad about their accomplishments," I tell her, because "to whom much is given, much is required."
You'll do fine! Spend some time with him exploring, treasure hunting (my daughter likes to look for different rocks and look them up or to look for Indian Heads) ... there's many times we come back empty handed, but the time was well spent together. Your kids will learn more from you than they will a program. You're not just helping develop a brain, but a kind, imaginative boy ... who will one day be a man and husband. Teach him to care, be kind and generous and to notice things outside the books ... he'll learn the things in all the books with time. Those other things can't be taught any other way but by example and practice. Enjoy them while they're young. Since you want the best for him, give him the best of yourself while he'll still let you icon_smile.gif

Amanda518 Posted 22 May 2008 , 4:59pm
post #6 of 32

Thank you so much that is very good information. I was so confused with what I should do with him and how I should do things. I am so happy that he is not snobby (sp) about his things. he does he finished first something but me and the teacher have told him to look over his stuff and if hes still done before hand to draw on the back of the paper until she is ready to take the paper up.. I think I am just so concerned I dont want him to fail because of me.. But I know I am trying and doing what he needs. I have to set more time for just me and him cause I just had a baby so there is a new one here in the house and I think he is feeling a little left out cause he has been say a few rude things lately. I think he is pushing for me to pay attention to him and I do I just think he wants so alone time no one else around like DH and little brother. I am a stay at home mom so he does get a lot of time with me but I always have the baby with me also. SO I think over the weekend I will take him to the movies and dinner.

thanks again.. you sound liek you are doing great with your daughter.. to bad you dont live close to me and our kids could be friends..lol icon_lol.gif

Amia Posted 22 May 2008 , 5:38pm
post #7 of 32

I was GT all through my school years, and the one thing I always noticed was that I was more likely to get in trouble (talking in class kind of trouble, not drugs or anything!) when I was bored. I would finish assignments and have nothing to keep my mind occupied. Then I worked it out with my teachers so I could read when I was done. Maybe his teacher would let him read when he finishes assignments too, as an alternative to drawing. Just encourage your son, make sure the work is still challenging him, but not overwhelming him, and he'll do fine.

As for the new baby, I hear ya on that one! I have a 2 year old and a 4 month old. I try to involve my older son as much as possible. He helps me change diapers, give baths and feed the baby (sometimes he tries to change the baby's diaper when I'm not around...icon_lol.gif). Maybe your older son could read to the baby, since he loves books?

mbelgard Posted 22 May 2008 , 6:00pm
post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoore

The only thing I would also suggest there is pre-reading some of the books that your child reads. My daughter is advanced and is now limited in the books from her school library that are at her reading level. There are times that she'll bring a book home that is perfectly fine for her reading level, but the content is for older kids. I have litterally told the school that I will personally buy books for her to read and to be put in the library for advanced readers before I have her reading some books just because it's the only ones left that they have in her level.




I second the problem with age appropriate books. My oldest had read a Harry Potter book before first grade, decided Narnia was too easy to finish the series before the year was out, started second grade reading the Hobbit and read Lord of the Rings during that year. Now he's just finished third grade and has read the entire "His Dark Materials" series and is begging for me to allow him to read Beowulf. I'm not so sure about that one.

My mother and some of my siblings are good at finding fantasy that isn't too bad so I don't have to screen so much. We have had to relax some things to be able to find him books that are hard enough.

I wouldn't worry too much about the abilities fading, my son hasn't had a teacher instructing him at his reading level since kindergarten and he still advances every year. He's been basically doing independent stuff since then and I don't instruct him at home either.

My biggest concern right now is keeping him active, he'd rather read than do anything else and exercise is important. We bought him a dirt bike to get his nose out of the books a couple years ago. icon_lol.gif

I also have problems with my brat coming up with interesting ways of squirming out of trouble. A couple months ago he had been telling his brother that there really are werewolves. When I yelled at him he told me that he has the right to believe what he wants based on the first amendment and he wanted to believe werewolves were real. And freedom of speech meant he could tell his brother about them.

Amia Posted 22 May 2008 , 6:15pm
post #9 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard


I also have problems with my brat coming up with interesting ways of squirming out of trouble. A couple months ago he had been telling his brother that there really are werewolves. When I yelled at him he told me that he has the right to believe what he wants based on the first amendment and he wanted to believe werewolves were real. And freedom of speech meant he could tell his brother about them.




I think I see a future lawyer in your midst. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

smoore Posted 22 May 2008 , 6:25pm
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by amia1024

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard


I also have problems with my brat coming up with interesting ways of squirming out of trouble. A couple months ago he had been telling his brother that there really are werewolves. When I yelled at him he told me that he has the right to believe what he wants based on the first amendment and he wanted to believe werewolves were real. And freedom of speech meant he could tell his brother about them.



I think I see a future lawyer in your midst. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




Or politician icon_confused.gif

Amanda518 Posted 22 May 2008 , 7:20pm
post #11 of 32

[quote="smoore"]

Quote:
Originally Posted by amia1024

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard


I also have problems with my brat coming up with interesting ways of squirming out of trouble. A couple months ago he had been telling his brother that there really are werewolves. When I yelled at him he told me that he has the right to believe what he wants based on the first amendment and he wanted to believe werewolves were real. And freedom of speech meant he could tell his brother about them.



I think I see a future lawyer in your midst. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




Lol that is so clever.. I hear ya on those little ways of getting out of things also there is always some reason to WHY this happened no matter what.. lol its so funny. I am like hhhmmm does he really think Im going to believe that one.. hahaha

About the pre-scanning books I have not had that problem just yet. His teacher only allows them to get books out of their grade level no higher so he comes home with book that do not have anything bad in them right now. I normally go to his book fairs and help pick out books he was on a series that is huge I think it has like 39 books right now It is really neat they have them at Barnes and Noble.. I can not remember the name but they are awesome imagination book. Its about a brother and sister that find this club house and when they read books in the clubhouse they travel to what ever time period that book is about. They have adventures and have to figure things out its a very good book and priced just right I think it was only 4 dollars.

He is really good with his brother I see no hurt feelings coming out of him towards his brother. I think its more of a mommas boy thing hes been my little man forever, now hes my big man and I think that transition might have been a little more harder on him. I know he really enjoys being with me so I think I need to set up once a week just me and him time, something like crafts or cooking or going some where.. I know with summer coming up we will have a lot of time to spend together..

costumeczar Posted 22 May 2008 , 8:06pm
post #12 of 32

mbelgard--Tell your son that the 1st amendment protects freedom of POLITICAL speech, not freedom to scare your brother speech! Maybe you could give him an assignment to study the history of the constitution if he's so interested in it! icon_twisted.gif

smoore Posted 22 May 2008 , 8:26pm
post #13 of 32

The books are Magic Tree House ... My daughter used to like those, too. He'd probably like Ready Freddy, too!

I think the biggest thing with the spending time with them is confidence in other areas of their life. They are confident in reading, math, other studies, but yet still have self esteem issues at this age. They just need you. icon_smile.gif The time you invest in them will instill their value as a person regardless of what they accomplish. I think that's why the other kid in my DD's class does the things he does. He's insecure in dealing with other kids, so he's constantly trying to prove to them how much better he is. His mom is in school every other day talking to the administration and teachers about how gifted he is and how they need to do more for him and he knows that she's there and what she's saying -- reinforcing to the kid that no only does he deserve special treatment, but in some ways the authority at school is undermined instead of respected. It's sad, really. He'd probably be an ok kid if he wasn't so pressured at home and then hear over and over again from his mom how everyone is doing him a disservice. I dread the day he grows up and gets a job!

Our school has reading cabinets that are geared to elementary reading levels that are age appropriate for all ages - they get points for each book and are tested on the computer to ensure comprehension is there. My DD's problem is that she's read everything in the cabinets (she gets a pizza party with the other top 10 readers in the school tomorrow, infact), so they send her to the school library to pick out her books, as those books are also in the computer. The library here is shared - elementary, middle and high school. Even if it wasn't, she read out of the cabinets by the beginning of 3rd grade .... I don't want my 3rd grader reading 5th grade content. They push the boyfriend/girlfriend thing so early as it is! LOL

mbelgard Posted 22 May 2008 , 8:58pm
post #14 of 32

I know what books you're talking about, the Magic Tree House series. Our problem with them was that they got easy way too quick and he gave them to his brother sometime in first grade. They are very cute and if your son is into them you won't have to screen what he's reading. The problems will come in time, enjoy not having to screen right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoore

Quote:
Originally Posted by amia1024

Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard


I also have problems with my brat coming up with interesting ways of squirming out of trouble. A couple months ago he had been telling his brother that there really are werewolves. When I yelled at him he told me that he has the right to believe what he wants based on the first amendment and he wanted to believe werewolves were real. And freedom of speech meant he could tell his brother about them.



I think I see a future lawyer in your midst. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif



Or politician icon_confused.gif





That was right about the time he came home and told us all about how wrong he thinks the pledge is for mentioning a monotheistic God in a country with freedom of religion. He had a real issue with it not mentioning multiple gods if it was going to mention any because he felt it should include all the gods that people in this country might worship. Not something he heard at home, I might not be religious but I was raised Army and it's just part of the pledge to me so I've never thought about it. Remember this is a third grader and yes he uses the word "monotheistic".

What I told him about the werewolf thing is that as his mother I get to tell him what beliefs he's allowed to express in my house. He can THINK whatever he wants but he just can't say it.

I've heard from his culture teacher that he comes up with questions that she can't believe a kid his age thinks about so he's not just doing it at home.

Amanda518 Posted 22 May 2008 , 9:03pm
post #15 of 32

I agree on those books, he has ventured off of them and now I understand why I thought they were as cute as can be I guess he thinks they are to easy.. I have not found a good series since those he just picks up what ever book looks interesting to him at the time. lol We will see what he picks next he just finished one of his other books..

indydebi Posted 22 May 2008 , 11:37pm
post #16 of 32

My son was tested with a genius IQ in about 4th grade. High IQ kids think very very different and it's a challenge sometimes.

For example, I asked what his IQ had to do with him not doing his homework and not turning it in. I was told "John has proven to himself that he can do the work .... he sees no need to prove it to a teacher." We battled this throughout his school life .... right down to his senior year!! So watch for this. It's not that he can't do the work ... he will find the work insulting and too easy "....so why bother doing it?"

High IQ kids are great with younger kids but seem to be socially inept at dealing with kids their own age. It was explained to me that it's because JOhn's brain was running at Ferrari speed and kids his age were running at Ford Pinto speed. John couldnt' relate to those kids. But John remembered what it was like to be 5 years old, so he was GREAT with younger kids!

They solve problems different. Instead of taking 2-3 plates from the dishwasher to the cabinet, John would set a bar stool in the middle of the kitchen and carry ALL the plates from the dishwasher to the stool, then carry them from the stool to the cabinet. Drove me nuts! Until I realized "the job is getting done, what do you care HOW he does it?"

John's expertise proved to be computers and computer games. It proved to be good Marine training since all of the equipment he used as a marine was computerized! We didn't force reading ... we were a heavy reading household anyway and it was always encouraged, but we made sure to encourage whatever he was interested in.

Just to let you know, this littel genius kid of mine is the son who was a 2-tours-of-Iraq, twice-decorated-including-the-purple-heart Marine. He set Marine history by being the first to score perfect on 2 tests the Marines have been giving for 20 years. His platoon were the top ten percent of test scorers and he was the platoon leader because he had the highest score of all of them.

Can you tell I'm a proud mama?? icon_biggrin.gif

mbelgard Posted 22 May 2008 , 11:57pm
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

High IQ kids think very very different and it's a challenge sometimes.

High IQ kids are great with younger kids but seem to be socially inept at dealing with kids their own age. It was explained to me that it's because JOhn's brain was running at Ferrari speed and kids his age were running at Ford Pinto speed. John couldnt' relate to those kids. But John remembered what it was like to be 5 years old, so he was GREAT with younger kids!





My son's PE teacher notices a difference even in a class where the kids are only with him for 30 minutes once or twice a week and are basically just running around. He doesn't quite fit in.

With my son part of it depends on his mood and what's going on, at times he does fine with kids his age, others he's better with older children or adults and he is good with little kids.



I was a gifted child too and my friends tended to be either gifted or older so I haven't really been surprised with my son bouncing around different age groups.

indydebi Posted 23 May 2008 , 12:10am
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbelgard

I was a gifted child too and my friends tended to be either gifted or older so I haven't really been surprised with my son bouncing around different age groups.




I also preferred hanging out with the adults instead of with "the kids" .... even when I was 6 and 7 years old (my son inherited his IQ and it was NOT from his dad!! icon_twisted.gif heh heh heh heh! Back in my day, they didn't call it "gifted" ... my parents refused to let them skip me ahead a grade.) So it was not surprising that my first husband was 18 years older than me (although when I grew up and he didn't .... well, that's a topic for the "Lounge" section! icon_lol.gif )

costumeczar Posted 23 May 2008 , 12:26am
post #19 of 32

Another problem that gifted kids tend to face is that because they "get" everything so quickly, they don't ever learn frustration tolerance. When a time comes that they DON'T understand something the first time they get very frustrated and just want to quit without trying again. I have to tell both of my kids that it's okay to be wrong sometimes, and that you won't learn everything the first time in life! You should have heard my daughter when she started taking piano lessons and saw a piece that she couldn't play right away. You'd have thought that she had been wounded with all of the caterwauling and the "I'll never learn this" sobbing. They just need to be pushed sometimes, and encouraged to try something new and allow themselves to fail. A lot of times gifted kids are considered lazy in school until the teachers realize that the problem is that they're bored, not lazy.

And they do think differently, too...When my son was in 2nd grade his teacher told me that they were talking about a story of some cats who were cooking a meal. She asked the kids if the story was real or fictional, and the other kids said things like it's fiction because cats can't talk, or because they don't wear clothes. My son said it was fiction because cats don't have opposable thumbs so they can't pick up pans to cook with. icon_lol.gif

mbelgard Posted 23 May 2008 , 12:47am
post #20 of 32

[quote="costumeczar"]Another problem that gifted kids tend to face is that because they "get" everything so quickly, they don't ever learn frustration tolerance. When a time comes that they DON'T understand something the first time they get very frustrated and just want to quit without trying again. [quote/]

I've found that my son just doesn't understand that other kids actually have to work at learning to read or spell. Because it was so easy for him his idea of "work" is messed up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar



And they do think differently, too...When my son was in 2nd grade his teacher told me that they were talking about a story of some cats who were cooking a meal. She asked the kids if the story was real or fictional, and the other kids said things like it's fiction because cats can't talk, or because they don't wear clothes. My son said it was fiction because cats don't have opposable thumbs so they can't pick up pans to cook with. icon_lol.gif




They do think outside the box. icon_lol.gif

Amanda518 Posted 23 May 2008 , 1:42am
post #21 of 32

Lol it is true that they do think out of the box my son comes up with some very complex situations when asked questions about stories or other things. Thay do a thing called the story with holes and its a store but its all twisted up and the kids have to figure out how this does not work and my son is the first one in the class that figures it out.(this is the GT class to and hes the youngest) Robert tends to hang out with kinds older then him.. He even has a crush on a girl from the neighborhood and she is 12..and very very tall so its funny when you see him talking to her. He is super sensitive and wants to love everyone. He is so sweet. He made sure he even gave the girl a valentines gift.

Do any of you guys know of web site that have games or things for him to mess around with that are more challenging and for gifted kids?

I can seriously agree to the getting mad when he cant do something sometimes I get so upset and him cause he is so mad and annoyed with whatever is is and I tell him he has to practice and figure things out sometimes, but I guess its hard for him to see that cause it takes no time at all for him to figure math and school things like that out.. He scored all 100's on the school's first grade benchmark test.. and his reading level is a 24 but he cant catch a football..lol and he wont even concider learning it either.. its so funny cause hes gets great grades but gets mad cause he cant so a very simple task.. got to love the kid..

I am a very pround mother also.. I am a young mother I had my son very young I was 18 when I had him. and I tend to see people looking and the saying oh shes a young mom.. So I have always been worried about people thinking that way of me.

tchrmom Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:10am
post #22 of 32

Regardless of your age, you obviously want what is best for your child and are considering more than just his intelligence in making decisions. That really shows a lot of wisdom and foresight, in my opinion. Many of the things you (and others) mention are things that are very common characteristics of gifted children- worrying about "adult" topics, asking advanced questions, seeing no need to do "boring" work, not handling frustration well (mainly because they are not used to it). I teach in our gifted program, and it is really hard to handle some of these.

Here are some ideas, some of which are from my experience, and some of which are from others that I have worked with and talked with (teachers and parents of gifted kids:

1) Keep feeding his obsessions, even if they change by the month. Let him read/investigate whatever he is interested in.

2) Ask his gifted ed teacher for the kinds of brainteasers he likes best.

3) Your problem about finding books that are appropriate for content is VERY common. Look at Newbery Medal winners and honor books for things for him to read. The Newbery is given to the best children's book of the year. You would still need to screen, but most would probably be OK. Here are some books that your child might like:

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C O'Brien (and its two sequels by the author's daughter, whose last name is Conly
The Toothpaste Millionaire by Jean Merrill
The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene duBois
The Great Brain series by John D. Fitzgerald -- GREAT, but preview first as there are some tough issues. You might be fine with it if you read it to him or discuss it with him-- or you may want to wait a few years.
Encyclopedia Brown series by Donald Sobol

Magazines are often good sources of reading material since they are on topics kids like. Kids love getting mail, so it's great in two ways.

4) Keep challenging him so he DOES have some things that are frustrating. The hardest thing about kids coming into our program in first grade is teaching them that it's OK not to be the smartest, the best, or the fastest at everything. There are things you can't do well, or as well as others, but most things that are worth doing take work and effort-- not just talent. It's a hard lesson for kids, since it really hits at their self-esteem. You can also be very sure that you let him know you love him JUST BECAUSE he's yours- not because he is smart. In fact, the less you talk about that the better. Sometimes it also helps to model making mistakes yourself so he can see how to handle them.

5) If he likes brainteasers, websudoku.com is a good site. Also setgame.com. Set is the name of a game that you can order. My students LOVE it, and it's one of those games that the whole family can play, and the adults don't have too much of an advantage. If you can find the 24 game it's also great, but I think you need to be able to multiply and divide, so you might have to wait a little on this.

6) He might like learning sign language, and the Signing Time videos are a fun way to teach them. They might be a little babyish, but they might not be.

7) Take him to museums and national parks and theaters and anything else that expands his horizons.

icon_cool.gif If you see signs of perfectionism, the book Perfectionism: What's Bad about being too good? has some good ideas. Also, there are some books called something like " THe gifted Kids' Survival Guide" and one for parents with a similar title.

9) The National Association for Gifted Children may also have some good ideas-- They have a website.

Good luck! Gifted kids need help, love, support, and challenge-- just like other kids. Hope some of this helps.

costumeczar Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:30am
post #23 of 32

Check out funbrain.com and mrnussbaum.com. They both have a lot of things for kids to do and some links. The Mr. Nussbaum site has popups but I didn't notice any on the funbrain one. Kidsgeo.com has some matching games where they have to move the states and countries around into the region where they fit, so it's good for geography and fun too.

I also wanted to suggest that you get him some nonfiction books for kids, as well as the fiction. My son has never been interested in fiction, but he read the magic tree house books because they have a little basis in reality. He loves the World Almanac for Kids and one called "Uncle John's Bathroom Reader for Kids Only." Make sure to get the kids only edition! The Uncle John's has little facts and stories in it that are short enough for bathroom reading icon_confused.gif which is gross, but since it's factual it's educational too, in a strange way.

indydebi Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:38am
post #24 of 32

I LUV Encyclopedia Brown books!! icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:43am
post #25 of 32

I loved Encyclopedia Brown too! And I have all the Nancy Drew books (still) up until the ones in about 1980. I had visions of my daughter happily reading them, but NOOOOO, she refuses. I once asked her if she just won't read them because I told her that she would like them, and she flat out said yes! icon_mad.gif

tchrmom Posted 24 May 2008 , 3:08am
post #26 of 32

Also, having re-read your post, you mention maybe not being as smart as he is. Research shows that parental IQ is typically within 10-15 points of the child's. While this is not a statement of absolutes in any specific case, make sure you don't sell yourself short. Also, regardless of "intellgence", or whatever IQ really measures, YOU are the parent-- with the wisdom and experience that comes with age. That is what matters in the end.

more books:

The Way Things Work by David Macaulay (not sure of spelling of last name)- It's also a website

The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles by Julie Andrews

BIographies might also be something he likes to read, and there are lots written for kids, so that controversial content is minimized.

All those sci-fi types series really hold high interest for some kids; you may need to be a little careful of the "nightmare factor" more than anything else:

Harry Potter (The later ones get MUCH darker. I don't have religious objections, but quite honestly the end of #4 creeped me out a bit, and the later books do get more violent.)

The Dark is RIsing series by SUsan Cooper (5 books, I think, some of which have won Newbery awards) It's based on Welsh legend, and I can't remember anything objectionable, but it's been a LONG time since I read them.

Redwall by Brian Jacques- I haven't read, but I have had kids tell me they like them

The SPiderwyck Chronicles - I read the first couple, and they were fine.

Narnia series by C.S. Lewis

The HObbit and Lord of th RIngs- Tolkien

Amanda518 Posted 24 May 2008 , 3:33am
post #27 of 32

Thanks so much for all the website I will check them out tomorrow so he can start enjoying them.. Thanks also for all the advice. It is nice to be able to talk with other moms or teachers that are in the same situations. I like hearing what other people did for some situations cause it is nice to be prepared for some of these things that I have not had to deal with yet.

Robert loves nonfictional things. He loves watching discovery channel and shows about space, global warming, animals, things about god and different religions, all kinds of stuff. He likes books about dinosaurs and space and fact books. He is even into suduko we have a few of the books laying around that he picks up here and there.

I Think it is very important to show them love no matter what we tell him when he does goofy things that he is very smart and he knows that is not a good thing to do and he knows it, but we dont ever say oh your so so smart this and that trying to boost him up and things cause. I do try to make it a point to him that everyone is equal it doesnt matter race gender or intellegence. In our family everyone is equal there are not male chores and female chores we do what ever need to be done. Like cooking is not only for girls he is learning how to cook(which he loves) and I help mow the yard and do yard work.. I am very proud of him I have never seen him be mean to kids or anything and he never puts anyone down. I even notice when he is getting on the bus that he allows the girls to go first I finally asked him what he was doing and he said girls are suppose to go before him that it would not be nice of him if he got on and left them behind.. hes a sweet heart..

thanks again for all the links and info on this.. thumbs_up.gif


Added I agree I know I have smarts its just that I sometimes tend to blow them off, my smarts are with way different things then math and school I can hold patterns and memory things very well but I spell and add not so great.. lol I wish I had those skills..like my son and husband and brother can all look at a math problem and tell you the answer with out think but for a second. My little brother is on the smarter side also he use to put puzzles together with out the picture just looking at the back of the puzzle piece..

mbelgard Posted 24 May 2008 , 4:52am
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amanda518

Added I agree I know I have smarts its just that I sometimes tend to blow them off, my smarts are with way different things then math and school I can hold patterns and memory things very well but I spell and add not so great.. lol I wish I had those skills..like my son and husband and brother can all look at a math problem and tell you the answer with out think but for a second. My little brother is on the smarter side also he use to put puzzles together with out the picture just looking at the back of the puzzle piece..




I had a gifted teacher who used to complain that the only gifted classes my school had were for lit and english. He said that not all of us belonged in advanced lit and they should have had gifted programs for all the academic subjects.

Spelling was always my worst subject, my husband's the same way and both of us have been known to confirm spelling with our 9 year old. icon_redface.gif

tchrmom Posted 24 May 2008 , 12:30pm
post #29 of 32

SOme of you might be interested in reading some of Howard Gardner's work on Multiple Intelligences. He originally identified these 7. I put in parentheses the words I use to explain them to the kids.

visual- spatial (art, shapes)
verbal linguistic (words)
logical-mathematical (numbers)
kinesthetic (body-- sports, athletics)
interpersonal (people)
intrapersonal (self)
musical-rhythmic (music)

Then he added "naturalist".

We discuss that these are some various ways to be smart, and that we all have all of them to some degree, but we often have more of one than of others. They then have a point of reference to talk about them.

Also, spelling is mostly an indicator of great visual memory-- not intelligence. You can certainly learn phonics rules and become a better speller, and those in the national spelling bees that do it with word roots are certainly smart, but that ability to just be able to spell, is mostly visual memory. I know plenty of really smart people who have to think pretty hard about whether "cat" starts with "c" or "k". Also, I have a theory that many kids who have that visual memory also learn to read mostly by sight and the shape of the word rather than by phonics. They often need phonics later as words get longer and harder and in order to figure out new words, but they initially learn by sight. I haven't tested it-- just what I think.

barbara-ann Posted 24 May 2008 , 1:45pm
post #30 of 32

My youngest daughter was in the GT program in the Cy-Fair school district in Houston. It was great until she started going to middle school. They were putting under acheivers into the GT classes. My daughter started getting bored because they would spend so much time with the under achievers, a majority of the class time was spent with the UA so the GT kids would finish their work and have nothing else to do the rest of the class period.

My daughter could do the school work, got 100's on tests, but wouldn't turn in her homework. Now that she is in high school, she recently decided that the GT(k-level) is not for her. She is in the band and will be getting a job this year. I would rather her be in on-level classes and passing than be in GT(k-level) and struggling because she has too much on her plate(band, after school band practice, games, work, friends)

As for skipping a grade...I would watch that too. My oldest daughter skipped a grade when she was younger. It kinda hurt her in high school only because when everyone else started to drive, she had to wait a whole year because of her age. Also when her friends started to date she had to wait again.

Barbara

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