How To Tell If It's Done?

Decorating By CakesbyBecca Updated 22 May 2008 , 8:09pm by aswartzw

CakesbyBecca Posted 22 May 2008 , 12:56am
post #1 of 11

I've read a lot of posts that have said to NOT open the oven door during cooking time. How do you know your cakes are done without opening the door? With 8" rounds, I know how long it usually takes and take them out after 30 mns and never have a problem. But what do I do for odd shaped cakes, like ovals, half-balls, other cakes where the time is not specified in the recipe?
TIA!

Becca

10 replies
Shola Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:17am
post #2 of 11

Well I always end up opening the door 2 or 3 times! Lol icon_lol.gif I stick a toothpick in and check if it comes out clean, the cakes always come out ok in the end, I don't think opening the door really hurts too much! The best sign for cakes being fully cooked without opening the door I found is the sides of the cake have come away from the side of the pan, you need a window in your oven for this check though! icon_biggrin.gif

ccr03 Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:24am
post #3 of 11

ditto, ditto, ditto!!!

I always open the door and thankfully nothing has ever happened!

leah_s Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:24am
post #4 of 11

Meh . . .I open the door, take the cake out, stick a toothpick in and if it's not done, open the door again and put it back in. Cake is just not that sensitive. At least mine aren't.

Now, souffle is a different story.

fondantfrenzy Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:38am
post #5 of 11

I also read somewhere that sticking a toothpick in the cake will allow moisture in your cake to escape,I dont know how true that is, but ever since i read that I freaked out. So what I do is,

1) Touch the top lightly. If it springs back, the cake is done.
2) Check to see if the cake will shrink from the sides of the pan.

kansaswolf Posted 22 May 2008 , 3:48am
post #6 of 11

I thought opening the door made more of a difference if it's a scratch cake... But I could be wrong.

I can usually guess how long it'll take to get done, but I usually tap the top of the cake lightly and see if it springs back well. I use a long wire cake tester for dome or ball shaped cakes, anything that's deeper than a couple inches!

leah_s Posted 22 May 2008 , 1:32pm
post #7 of 11

I only bake from scratch.

Seriously, you guys are making this way harder than it really is.

CakesbyBecca Posted 22 May 2008 , 7:09pm
post #8 of 11

Thanks for the responses. I did end up using a toothpick several times. I put too many pans in the oven at once and it took twice as long to bake as I thought, but the cakes were fine.

Becca

ziggytarheel Posted 22 May 2008 , 7:21pm
post #9 of 11

Believe it or not, my oven doesn't even have a window in it! When we bought this house (new), I just assumed it had a window. It LOOKS like it has a window, but it doesn't.

So I have to open my oven door more than most. And it does cause the temperature to drop and then heat back up. So I try to have the door open for as little time as possible as infrequently as possible.

But if I had a recipe that sensitive, I would have to just put it aside. I don't generally bake anything, cakes or otherwise, that is that sensitive.

Cakebelle Posted 22 May 2008 , 7:39pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I only bake from scratch.

Seriously, you guys are making this way harder than it really is.





Exactly! icon_biggrin.gif

aswartzw Posted 22 May 2008 , 8:09pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakebelle

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

I only bake from scratch.

Seriously, you guys are making this way harder than it really is.




Exactly! icon_biggrin.gif




Ditto! Once it's set (in other words: the majority of the baking is done) you can do whatever you want to with it. I think that's just to keep it from falling. I always use toothpicks and never had dry cakes. Like a little pin prick in your cake is going to release all the moisture?

In fact, I leave my oven door open when I stick the toothpick in and never a problem. icon_biggrin.gif

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