Cakes That Are Moist

Decorating By hwnhulahands Updated 23 May 2008 , 12:07am by cakenewbiekgm

hwnhulahands Posted 21 May 2008 , 6:54pm
post #1 of 21

I have a wedding cake to do on friday and the bride specifically said that she wants the cake moist (more than what I have done in the past and what she had tasted of mine). I use the box mix and she said that was alittle too dry and if I could make it more moist. How can I do this? I will be making a 12" double layer square in white, 10" double layer in yellow and a 8" double layer in strawberry. Each layer is about 2 inches high. I will be using 3 boxes of white per layer, 2 boxes of yellow per layer and 1 1/2 box of strawberry per layer, how much of whatever I need to make it more moist per layer do I need (if that makes any sense)? Please help with any suggestions ASAP TIA

20 replies
puzzlegut Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:00pm
post #2 of 21

I usually use the cake mix extender recipe from this site and the cakes are always moist. I also make sure to bake them 25 degrees lower then what the box says, use bake even strips/flower nails, and after I flip the cakes out of their pans, I wrap them in plastic wrap while they are still warm.

smoore Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:06pm
post #3 of 21

I agree - use an extender such as the White Almond Sour Cream cake on this site. It's very moist. You can adapt it for any type mix you're using.

srodts Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:13pm
post #4 of 21

I always put mine in the freezer for atleast a day and they come out soooooo moist. HTH

tracycakes Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:13pm
post #5 of 21

One of the things I learned only on is that when you test your cake for doneness, use a toothpick and when you pull it out, you should have a few crumbs on the toothpick. If it comes out clean, it is overcooked. Mine have always been wonderfully moist and last for several days when i do that. If I happen to overcook and the toothpick comes out clean (rarely), I think the cake is too dry.

yummymummy Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:18pm
post #6 of 21

I also wrap mine in plastic wrap while still warm. I let them cool for 10 min in the pan, then turn them out and wrap them really good and refrigerate...although the refrigeration isn't necessary. My last customer said it was super moist and a week later was still moist! She said it was the best cake she's ever had! thumbs_up.gificon_biggrin.gif

toodlesjupiter Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:20pm
post #7 of 21

You can also add a box of the same flavor pudding (or a complimentary flavor), and an extra egg per mix, bake @ 325 instead of 350.

Mommaskip Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:21pm
post #8 of 21

also in your cake mix recipe instead of using water replace it with milk that helps with the moistness. i also agree to bake at a lower temp. until done to avoid over baking.

mjballinger Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:25pm
post #9 of 21

Have you tried a simple syrup wash? These can really add some much needed moisture. I just cook together 1 c. water and 1 c. sugar, stirring to dissolve the sugar and boil it a minute or two. Remove from heat and add in some flavoring - something that compliments the cake - or just vanilla. Then you brush it on the cake. I usually do mine a few times, letting it soak in between brushings, especially if it's from scratch. With boxed mixes, I usually just to it once or twice or it gets too moist.
Good Luck!

RRGibson Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:35pm
post #10 of 21

These are the things that I've found help make a cake more moist:

sour cream
buttermilk
using some oil in place of a portion of the butter
dry pudding

Also, now, I always freeze my wedding cake layers for at least a day. It really does help with the moistness of the cake. And also baking at a lower temp help with the moisture as well as leads to a flatter top on your cake.

diane Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:46pm
post #11 of 21
diane Posted 21 May 2008 , 7:55pm
post #12 of 21

oh...i forgot to mention this...
i was watching food network a few weeks ago. they were at a famous bakery somewhere...can't remember where. anyway, the baker had been in business for over 30 years and he was sharing some of his secrets. one of his secrets to getting a moist cake was this:

after you take the cakes out of the oven, flip them upside down(i don't remember what he put them down on...i'm guessing something that wouldn't stick. anyway...he said that the steam goes back into the cake and keeps it moist.
isn't that a neat tip??!! icon_eek.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif i couldn't believe it. it made perfect sense.
hope this helps you! thumbs_up.gif

yummymummy Posted 21 May 2008 , 8:00pm
post #13 of 21

Yup, that tip does the same thing as wrapping the cakes in saran wrap. And it's an excellent tip! thumbs_up.gif

mayamia Posted 21 May 2008 , 8:08pm
post #14 of 21

Ditto to the tip of wrapping in the plastic for me it works wonders

Cakebelle Posted 21 May 2008 , 8:11pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by diane

oh...i forgot to mention this...
i was watching food network a few weeks ago. they were at a famous bakery somewhere...can't remember where. anyway, the baker had been in business for over 30 years and he was sharing some of his secrets. one of his secrets to getting a moist cake was this:

after you take the cakes out of the oven, flip them upside down(i don't remember what he put them down on...i'm guessing something that wouldn't stick. anyway...he said that the steam goes back into the cake and keeps it moist.
isn't that a neat tip??!! icon_eek.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif i couldn't believe it. it made perfect sense.
hope this helps you! thumbs_up.gif




I've used this "trick" for many years now it works everytime! I just flip the cakes upside down on a wax-paper lined cooling rack. Another advantage to this is that the top crust comes off too with the wax paper. This is best for cakes that do not have a dome on the top though.

janebrophy Posted 21 May 2008 , 8:12pm
post #16 of 21

I agree - bake at 325, Just until the top springs back, and wrap while warm. I tried some of the extenders on this site, and my family/friends just like the plain ol'box mix! But using these tips, I've learned to make a mean Betty Crocker! icon_smile.gif

Cakebelle Posted 21 May 2008 , 8:13pm
post #17 of 21

Oh, and for the cakes that do dome, I just cool them on the cooling rack, as you would normally do, and then when I torte them I brush on a simple syrup to add moisture to the cakes.

HTH

hwnhulahands Posted 22 May 2008 , 11:55pm
post #18 of 21

Thank you so much for your tips and ideas. I will try them. Thanks again.

hwnhulahands Posted 22 May 2008 , 11:55pm
post #19 of 21

Thank you so much for your tips and ideas. I will try them. Thanks again.

hwnhulahands Posted 22 May 2008 , 11:56pm
post #20 of 21

Thank you so much for your tips and ideas. I will try them. Thanks again.

cakenewbiekgm Posted 23 May 2008 , 12:07am
post #21 of 21

I posted a question on here about simple syrup and it sounds like using a simple syrup in a complimentary flavor could be the right touch to your normal recipe you use.

What a great post - lots of great tips to use!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%