Covering And Transporting Wedding Cakes

Decorating By cakewanda Updated 23 May 2008 , 3:30am by steplite

cakewanda Posted 21 May 2008 , 2:45pm
post #1 of 18

I am looking for some expert advice from all the wonderful experienced bakers. I am doing a wedding cake (12", 10", 8", 6") stacked. I will transport these and stack them at the reception hall. But here is my question, what do I use to cover and transport these cakes - particularly the large 12" and a large sheet cake to go with these?

Thanks for all the help and advice
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17 replies
leah_s Posted 21 May 2008 , 2:58pm
post #2 of 18

Well, of course I would suggest that you use SPS for stacking/support and I never - never - box a cake for transport. Never.

Tona Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:09pm
post #3 of 18

I agree with leahs. I just did a cke the same sizes you are doing. I used the SPS system stacked it at home and took it stacked to the church. No problem This is the first time I had used the system and I love it. Leahs thanks for the instructions on the use of the system. I will never use another system this was great.

KHalstead Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:14pm
post #4 of 18

I would stick separate cakes in bakery boxes personally!

twooten173 Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:18pm
post #5 of 18

ok call me slow... what's the SPS System?

mindywith3boys Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:19pm
post #6 of 18

I just put them in the back of my van. I put down a towel first and then I put the cakes on top of shelf liner. I also don't remove the cakes from the plastic cake boards I iced them on until I get them there.

TC123 Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:22pm
post #7 of 18

When I did the wedding cake for my sister and brother-in-law, I stacked it at home. I put it on the back floor of the truck on a non-skid, level surface, and drove very carefully. I think I held my breath the whole trip. icon_razz.gif I did not box or cover it. (The truck used for transportation was thoroughly clean and never had any pets in it.)

I don't know what the SPS sytem is, but I'm going to go & research it now... Good luck with your project! icon_smile.gif

CakeDiva73 Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:22pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Well, of course I would suggest that you use SPS for stacking/support and I never - never - box a cake for transport. Never.




a couple questions....(potentially dumb icon_smile.gif )

Since the SPS doesn't have a long dowel that runs thru it, I am confused as to how all the sep. tiers stay together. I understand your instructions (thank you!!) about pressing the cake board to make a nub but how big is this 'nub'? Big enough to keep a 12" securely on a 16" and so on?

Also, for those really big tiers, are you custom cutting foam core instead of cardboard so it doesn't bend?

And lastly, if you don't box your cake, what are you using to prevent it from getting dust, etc? I know you are a big baker so maybe you have a commercial van or something but what about when we need the use the family mini-van for a cake delivery? In the summer, you need to a/c on and no matter how clean that car is, dust is always flying around.

Thanks for all your help, I am just finishing up ordering all the SPS pieces at GSA and wanted to make sure I understood.

(P.S. I was going to PM you but I thought it might be information that other people could use too icon_smile.gif )

TC123 Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:34pm
post #9 of 18

P.S. For those cakes that are separated tiers, I box them individually in cake boxes and assemble at the site. thumbs_up.gif

tamrick Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:34pm
post #10 of 18

I would also like to know what sps is?

vicmic Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:43pm
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeDiva73

Quote:
Originally Posted by leahs

Well, of course I would suggest that you use SPS for stacking/support and I never - never - box a cake for transport. Never.



a couple questions....(potentially dumb icon_smile.gif )

Since the SPS doesn't have a long dowel that runs thru it, I am confused as to how all the sep. tiers stay together. I understand your instructions (thank you!!) about pressing the cake board to make a nub but how big is this 'nub'? Big enough to keep a 12" securely on a 16" and so on?

Also, for those really big tiers, are you custom cutting foam core instead of cardboard so it doesn't bend? )




Would like to know these things also. What is the "nub" thingy about?

vrmcc1 Posted 21 May 2008 , 3:49pm
post #12 of 18

Sps is single plate separator system you can order it from bakery crafts. It is similar to wilton plates and pillars but much steadier. and the plates had a point in the center, you put a hole in the center of your board and then the point holds your board on the plate. I wont use anything else!!

When I transport I stack the bottom largest 2 or three tiers depending on how big they are (this is because if the cake is really big stacking them all would be too heavy) then sit the rest seperately to stack on site.

I fold the back seat of my van down and use a single fitted sheet and put it over the seat and on the floor then put down a piece of non skid mat. the sheet helps with any dirt and dust that my be on the floor or under the seats.

Val

cakewanda Posted 21 May 2008 , 4:20pm
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by vrmcc1

Sps is single plate separator system you can order it from bakery crafts. It is similar to wilton plates and pillars but much steadier. and the plates had a point in the center, you put a hole in the center of your board and then the point holds your board on the plate. I wont use anything else!!

When I transport I stack the bottom largest 2 or three tiers depending on how big they are (this is because if the cake is really big stacking them all would be too heavy) then sit the rest seperately to stack on site.

I fold the back seat of my van down and use a single fitted sheet and put it over the seat and on the floor then put down a piece of non skid mat. the sheet helps with any dirt and dust that my be on the floor or under the seats.

Val


Thank you for this nice detailed explanation. Are there pictures of a cake stacked using this method that I can see. I am guessing that the cakes are stacked on each other without separations in between? I would normally use dowels in each cake and one big one through the entire four cakes.

TC123 Posted 21 May 2008 , 4:38pm
post #14 of 18

Thank you so much for sharing Val! icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 21 May 2008 , 9:07pm
post #15 of 18

I am happy to send the instructions for using SPS to anyon who sends me their email.

I deliver in our SUV which is quite clean.

I have never custom cut foam core. Cardboards work just fine.

Larger tiers stacked, will stay in place by their own weight.

I delivered 5 cakes last weekend, and had one completely assembled 3 tier picked up by a "civilian." I did vacuum out the back of his SUV, then put down some non-skid and set the cake on top of that. No problems.

twooten173 Posted 22 May 2008 , 4:16am
post #16 of 18

Is this the SPS system? I feel silly asking but just want to make sure we are talking about the same thing.
http://globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=17686

vrmcc1 Posted 23 May 2008 , 2:42am
post #17 of 18

Here is a link to bakerycrafts. http://www.bakerycrafts.com/Catalog.aspx?np=10380,10423&PageNumber=2

This page has the sps system on it.

cakewanda
I am having trouble uploading pics but if I do cakes stacked directly ontop of each other I use the 4 inch columns I have also used the 9 inch ones so that there is a space between each layer (either 5inches between or less if I trim the columns shorter) depends on the style I am doing. If I use the longer columns I assemble the cake on site.

Val

steplite Posted 23 May 2008 , 3:30am
post #18 of 18

I do the same as TCarra. I place each cake in a seperate cake box and assemble at the site. No problems.

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