How Big Is A 1/2 Sheet Cake?

Decorating By kelsiedelizzle Updated 16 May 2008 , 10:48am by Mike1394

kelsiedelizzle Posted 15 May 2008 , 10:44pm
post #1 of 9

I read somewhere online that a 9" x 13" cake is considered "1/4 sheet cake." Would two 9" x 13" cakes put together equal a "1/2 sheet cake"? Or is there a specific pan that I can get at Michael's for 1/2 sheet?
Publix says that 1/2 sheet is approx. 40 servings. Does this sound right to anyone?

Thanks!
~~Kelsie

P.S. Would $50 be reasonable/unreasonable for a cake with a FBCT 1/2 sheet chocolate cake w/ red icing accents from a cake decorator who's only sold 2 other cakes ever?

8 replies
kelsiedelizzle Posted 15 May 2008 , 11:07pm
post #2 of 9

Next Question:

Wilton sells "perfomance" and "decorator preferred" pans... which is better?
The sizes are 11" x 15", 9" x 13" and 12" x 18"
so one of those must be "1/2 sheet" right?

indydebi Posted 15 May 2008 , 11:28pm
post #3 of 9

I refuse to use the terms "half" or "full" sheet cakes. Most cake civilians don't know what they are. .... they just use the lingo and have no idea what they are ordering.

2 examples: My neighbor asked to borrow my "half sheet pan". I said, "What size pan is that?" SHe said, "I have no idea!" Imagine her surprise if I had given her my 14x22, which serves over 75 people, when all she needed was cake for about 25!!! icon_surprised.gif

A friend asked for a price on a "full sheet cake". I asked how many people he needed to feed. He said "about ten". TEN?????? Did you say FULL sheet cake.....which feeds about 100?????? icon_surprised.gif

So I don't even use the terms. I ask them how many people they need to feed and then I tell them what size cake they need.

kelsiedelizzle Posted 15 May 2008 , 11:36pm
post #4 of 9

Yup, it's pretty confusing.
Thanks for your advice. I went ahead and asked the lady who ordered the cake how many people she wanted to feed.
Whether she needs 20 or 40 servings, I still need to buy a new pan. But it would be nice if I bought the right one icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 16 May 2008 , 12:25am
post #5 of 9

As Indydebi said, don't use the 1/4, 1/2 or full 'sheet cake' termsicon_sad.gif They are sooooooo confusing to everyone.
To me a rectangle shape cake that is one cake mix is a 1/4 (pan size 12x8x2); any pan size that uses 2 mixes is a 1/2 sheet (11x15).
Also I keep telling everyone if you match the pan size to the board & box sold as a 1/4 or 1/2 you will find the above mentioned sizes fit best.
A 12x18 just bearly fits on a 1/2 sheet board, leaving no room for a bordericon_sad.gif And a 9x13 cake does NOT fit on a 1/4 sheet board.

kakeladi Posted 16 May 2008 , 12:28am
post #6 of 9

As Indydebi said, don't use the 1/4, 1/2 or full 'sheet cake' termsicon_sad.gif They are sooooooo confusing to everyone.
To me a rectangle shape cake that is one cake mix is a 1/4 (pan size 12x8x2); any pan size that uses 2 mixes is a 1/2 sheet (11x15).

kelsiedelizzle Posted 16 May 2008 , 12:49am
post #7 of 9

So, Kakeladi, you prefer 11 x 15 for the "1/2 sheet" and it uses 2 cake mixes?

kakeladi Posted 16 May 2008 , 6:40am
post #8 of 9

Yep. As I said, it fits the board and box much better than the other sizes some use.

Mike1394 Posted 16 May 2008 , 10:48am
post #9 of 9

I thought it was the same size as a 1/2 sheet tray 12x18.

Mike

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