Do You Make Double Layers W/ Your 3" Pans?

Decorating By yummymummy Updated 16 May 2008 , 3:03pm by hotmamatigger

yummymummy Posted 13 May 2008 , 8:31pm
post #1 of 9

I'm making a 50th Anniversary Cake soon and was going to go with a 10", 8", and 6" from 3" deep pans. But, now I'm thinking of just doing 10" and 6" because I like the 4" difference. So my question is, if I make a double layer of each size to give more height to the cake, would it give me double the servings? It seems like a lot of cakes have more height, so I'm assuming this is standard? icon_confused.gif This sounds like a really stupid question, but I want to make sure I'm not figuring something wrong. I'm going by the Wilton serving chart...which confuses me. It needs to serve 55 people. Thanks for all of your help! icon_smile.gif

8 replies
yummymummy Posted 13 May 2008 , 9:50pm
post #2 of 9


Jayde Posted 13 May 2008 , 10:41pm
post #3 of 9

Most vendors cut cake as a slice. They cut a thin slice of the entire tier.

So, if you took a 3 inch and stacked it on top of a 3 inch for a total of 6 inches in height, technically it would not give you more servings. The servings would be bigger, taller rather, because most cakes have a combines height of 4 inches, unless the orderer specifies differently. If you didnt cut the cake like that in slices, then people wouldnt get the filling along with the 2 layers of cake.

kimmyboo925 Posted 13 May 2008 , 10:59pm
post #4 of 9

I did that once.. and they did cut the cake in slices... so its double the amount of cake but you cant charge them for it if they are paying by the serving. It looked nice.. PM me and ill send the pic.. for some reason my pics are too big and cant post them. icon_cry.gif

gigger Posted 13 May 2008 , 11:01pm
post #5 of 9

When I use my 3' pans I do all the tiers 3' and each tier is 3' no filling.
Once they are iced they measure about 3 1/2'.

TexasSugar Posted 13 May 2008 , 11:21pm
post #6 of 9

According to Wilton the 6 and 10 3in will serve 50 people, so that is really close. Maybe 5 people won't eat cake. icon_smile.gif Are you serving it? If so then just cut a few of the pieces a little smaller. HeHe.

Personally I wouldn't do two of them together. That's 6ins of just cake. By the time you added the filling and icing you are talking 6.5 to 7 inchs. That won't fit on most dessert plates.

I'd do the 6 and 10in and torte them twice giving you three layers of cake and two layers of filling. If you are worried about the servings, then I'd make another 6in as a side 'kitchen cake'.

yummymummy Posted 13 May 2008 , 11:37pm
post #7 of 9

Thanks for the tips! I think I'll go with my original plan. since I don't want to be short on cake. icon_smile.gif Planning out servings is a pain in the rear! If you're going for a certain look, you either end up with too much or too little cake! icon_mad.gif

gateauxdamour Posted 16 May 2008 , 1:50pm
post #8 of 9

I've done it both ways. I've made a 3" layer, torted and filled for a final cake that winds up being about 4" tall after icing. To me that winds up looking almost identical to the cake I get when I use 2 - 2" layers with filling in between.

I've also made 2 - 3" layers with filling in between. That makes for an extremely impressive cake. After filling and icing, the tiers were close to 8" tall. That one was for my cousins wedding, so I was pulling out all the stops! I'm just glad we thought about it beforehand and bought 9" dessert plates! It was cut to give the same size servings as a one layer 3" cake on the Wilton chart (in other words BIG servings!).

hotmamatigger Posted 16 May 2008 , 3:03pm
post #9 of 9

I'm working on the design for Baby Block Cakes. To get the cube look I'm doing 4 layers of 2" cakes with a piece of foam board in the middle to separate them. When I cut the cake then I will have a divider so I'll still get those short slices. Just another take on it.


Quote by @%username% on %date%