Writing On Cakes Which Do You Prefer?

Decorating By aundrea Updated 24 May 2008 , 3:47am by penguinprincess

aundrea Posted 10 May 2008 , 3:04am
post #1 of 10

i am making a mothers day cake and will have a lot of writing to do on the top. probably adds up to about 5 lines.
im debating what to use for the lettering.
just piping gel or a combo of pipping gel and frosting. or whatelse can i use?
my hand writing is horrible, and i really want this writing to come out as nice as possible.
i will probably tint it to a soft/med. pink to match the border.
thanks in advance,
darlene

9 replies
MissMoore Posted 10 May 2008 , 4:18am
post #2 of 10

I always use thinned buttercream. that works the best for me!

JudyDP Posted 10 May 2008 , 4:45am
post #3 of 10

I hesitate writing on cakes, also. I even bought a book explaining how, but I'm still too afraid of messing it up. Here is the most beautiful cake with writing. She was kind enough to share her technique. I haven't tried it, yet. Hope it works for you!


http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=55379

springlakecake Posted 10 May 2008 , 11:11am
post #4 of 10

I was surprised to click on that photo and see that it was mine LOL! thanks!

I don't usually do that method anymore because I use the tappits (letter cutouts that you can use fondant or gumpaste)

But the royal icing will work, but you need to have a day or so to let it dry. Also there will be breakage, so you need to make at least double. So with a lot of writing that might be difficult.

You could do the pin prick method where you print out your message and prick little holes with a pin and then smooth it gently on your cake and then trace with buttercream.

I hate writing. Sometimes I will just put it on the cake board to save myself the torment.

Erika513x2 Posted 10 May 2008 , 11:50am
post #5 of 10

writting isn't that bad . at first i hated the writting part b-c i would have this nice cake and crapy writting but i just got comfortable with it and just thinned my icing alot very very thin and just let it flow. relax its all in the wrist, even at times i will hold my elbow with my right hand b-c i'm left handed to keep my left hand steady lol and just move the wrist. there are days when i had to just use my pracice board and flow on that to practice and kind've warm up. but even if mess up just let it dry and use a toothpick to take it off then you can either re-ice that area or just use ur finger to smooth it out and write on it again.. i usually use script instead of print. also when you are about to finish a letter go back up into the letter so you won't have a little tail. or you can just like apply a bit more pressure and dig ur tip into the end part, i like really curvy writting and i might do that at times. GL i hope i helped you b-c i rememeber my first real cake my hand trembled and my heart was racing lol. anyway people will be so amazed with the actual cake then the writting and remember only YOU know the mistakes ...

have_your_cake Posted 11 May 2008 , 12:11am
post #6 of 10

my Wilton teacher said to add a bit of piping gel to the thinned buttercream. It makes the icing smoother and a little more elastic so it doesn't break as easily when you are writing. Also practice it a few times on a piece of waxed paper to get the feeling of it and see what works or doesn't before starting to write on the cake.

mrs_morton Posted 11 May 2008 , 3:17am
post #7 of 10

I don't like writing either. I wanted the text for my Mother's Day cake to be neat so I just printed what I wanted on the computer and used colorflow to copy over each letter. I did doubles of everything to allow for breakage but none of the letters broke. I really like how the color flow letters look in comparison to my attempts at writing with icing. It does take a bit of planning ahead so they dry for a couple of days but I think it's worth it.

have_your_cake Posted 11 May 2008 , 4:13pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs_morton

I don't like writing either. I wanted the text for my Mother's Day cake to be neat so I just printed what I wanted on the computer and used colorflow to copy over each letter. I did doubles of everything to allow for breakage but none of the letters broke. I really like how the color flow letters look in comparison to my attempts at writing with icing. It does take a bit of planning ahead so they dry for a couple of days but I think it's worth it.




I must do something wrong. My RI & color flow pieces always break. Do you have any tips?

aundrea Posted 24 May 2008 , 2:46am
post #9 of 10

thank-you for all your suggestions.
the writing, came out ok. i had to leave one line out because i ran out of room. i used thinned buttercream w/pipping gel.
i must have been so worried about the writing, that i didnt properly support the cake.
a 6-layer red velvet cake.
when i lifted it to put it back into the refrig. it collasped.
it tasted good, and by then the writing didnt matter! LOL.
but i will definatley try the techniques suggested here.
thanks again!

penguinprincess Posted 24 May 2008 , 3:47am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by merissa

I was surprised to click on that photo and see that it was mine LOL! thanks!

I don't usually do that method anymore because I use the tappits (letter cutouts that you can use fondant or gumpaste)

But the royal icing will work, but you need to have a day or so to let it dry. Also there will be breakage, so you need to make at least double. So with a lot of writing that might be difficult.

You could do the pin prick method where you print out your message and prick little holes with a pin and then smooth it gently on your cake and then trace with buttercream.

I hate writing. Sometimes I will just put it on the cake board to save myself the torment.




Where do you get your tappits? I have seen some on cakes and have asked where they get them, but have never had a response. I would love to get some. How do you like them. I would love to also try your parchment paper technique

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