Covering Dark Rum Cake

Decorating By Limpy Updated 7 May 2008 , 11:43pm by terrier

Limpy Posted 5 May 2008 , 10:21pm
post #1 of 14

Help! As a favour to a friend, I am covering a dark, heavy 9"X13" cake with fondant. The problem is is that she used so much rum, that the cake is "weeping". It is covered in almond paste, but the alcohol is seeping from the corners. I was thinking of covering with a crusting buttercream in the hopes that this will "seal" the cake & then I can cover with fondant,which is what she wants. What do all you experts out there think?. I have to do this for next week, so I am hoping that I get a speedy reply. Thanks in advance.

13 replies
terrier Posted 5 May 2008 , 10:47pm
post #2 of 14

I would cover it in royal icing then sand it smooth, apply another, sand again and then put the fondant on top. Good luck!!

Cake_Princess Posted 6 May 2008 , 3:28am
post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Limpy

Help! As a favour to a friend, I am covering a dark, heavy 9"X13" cake with fondant. The problem is is that she used so much rum, that the cake is "weeping". It is covered in almond paste, but the alcohol is seeping from the corners. I was thinking of covering with a crusting buttercream in the hopes that this will "seal" the cake & then I can cover with fondant,which is what she wants. What do all you experts out there think?. I have to do this for next week, so I am hoping that I get a speedy reply. Thanks in advance.




Is this a traditional black cake/west Indian rum cake/black pudding?

If you can take the marzipan off this should allow some of the moisture to evaporate. Then you can cover it again.

If it's black cake I would not suggest covering it in buttercream. Also, if it is a black cake and you are going to use royal icing (which it's traditionally covered in) do not cover it in fondant.

Limpy Posted 6 May 2008 , 8:30am
post #4 of 14

She insists that it be covered in fondant, so I am hoping that if I cover it in royal as suggested, that it will be o.k. once covered in fondant.

Limpy Posted 7 May 2008 , 9:03am
post #5 of 14

How & what do you use to sand royal icing to make it smooth?

Limpy Posted 7 May 2008 , 9:14am
post #6 of 14

O.K. I am looking at the site for royal icing recipes. They are either made with raw eggs (which I don't want to do) or it states that the icing is good for decorations, but not for icing a cake. Help! What recipe do I use to seal this cake? Time is running out & I am starting to turn grey.

bashini Posted 7 May 2008 , 9:28am
post #7 of 14

Don't you have ready to use Royal Icing Sugar, to buy from a Super Market?

terrier Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:25pm
post #8 of 14

* 3 Tablespoons Wilton Meringue Powder or any Meringue Powder
* 1 lb. (4 cups) confectioners' sugar (about 1lb.)
* 6 Tablespoons warm water*

Beat all ingredients until icing forms peaks (7-10 minutes at low speed with a heavy-duty mixer, 10-12 minutes at high speed with a hand-held mixer). Recipe makes 3 cups.

NOTE: Keep all utensils completely grease-free for proper icing consistency.

* For stiffer icing, use 1 tablespoon less water.

**When using large countertop mixer or for stiffer icing, use 1 tablespoon less water.

Thinned Royal Icing: To thin for pouring, add 1 teaspoon water per cup of royal icing. Use grease-free spoon or spatula to stir slowly. Add ½ teaspoon water at a time until you reach proper consistency.




You would apply it over the almond paste/marzipan.

Limpy Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:33pm
post #9 of 14

Thanks Terrier. I am going to give it a try. I still don't know how to sand the royal icing smooth though.

terrier Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:36pm
post #10 of 14

To Flat Ice a Cake
1. Apply on top of almond paste. Spoon almost half the icing on top of the cake and spread it evenly with a palette knife, using a paddling motion to help remove any air bubbles.

2. Draw an icing ruler at an angle of about 30° across the top of the cake applying light, even pressure. Remove any surplus icing. If possible leave to dry for 24 hours.

3. To ice the sides, place the cake on an icing table. Spread the icing on the sides and smooth roughly with a small palette knife. Hold a cake scraper or palette knife at an angle of 45° and draw it towards you around the cake to smooth the surface.

4. For a square cake apply each side separately. Neaten the edges with a palette knife and leave to dry for 24 hours.

5. For a really smooth finish apply a second thinner coat. Use fine sand paper to rub and smooth down any imperfections before re-coating. Brush off any loose icing with a clean pastry brush.

Limpy Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:36pm
post #11 of 14

Sorry, when using the Kitchen Aid to make the royal icing, do I use the wisk or the paddle attachment? Thanks again.

terrier Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:39pm
post #12 of 14

I use my wisk.... because you want the air.
Good Luck!
Cheers,
ally

Limpy Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:43pm
post #13 of 14

Thank you, thank you,thank you. I feel more confident now knowing what I have to do. I will post pictures once completed. Thanks again.
p.s. I am in Oshawa, Ontario, so not far from you.

terrier Posted 7 May 2008 , 11:43pm
post #14 of 14

Hope to see the cake after you are all done! icon_biggrin.gif

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