How Much Can You Earn Being A Wilton Teacher?

Decorating By Katied75 Updated 16 May 2008 , 6:18pm by tabbiekat

Katied75 Posted 4 May 2008 , 3:55am
post #1 of 36

There may be a Wilton job opening up near me a few towns away. I'm only in course 2, but it will open up just as I'm finishing course 3. I'm not sure whether to apply or not. Do you get additional training on the Wilton way of teaching? How much are you paid?

Katie

35 replies
CeeTee Posted 4 May 2008 , 5:36am
post #2 of 36

It doesn't pay enough to pay the bills, if that's what you're wondering. It's roughly $130-$150 ish per class depending on how many students you have. I dont have the pay chart on me so I cant give specifics.

You do get DVDs and training books. Wilton also has training seminars throughout the year you can attend.

So far I've really liked it! I only had one student for my Course I, but we had a lot of fun and it was a good start for me. I'm doing Course I again for May, and then will move on to doing cookie bouquet and candy making classes.

CakeDiva73 Posted 4 May 2008 , 5:41am
post #3 of 36

Do you get paid regardless of how many students you have?

CeeTee Posted 4 May 2008 , 6:12am
post #4 of 36

Yep, as long as you have one student, you get paid for the full amount. icon_biggrin.gif Wilton scales the pay, so the more students you have, the more you make. But by scaling it they still make it worth your time to teach small classes.

Personally I like classes that are 6 students or less. You can give more personal attention that way. icon_smile.gif

kakeladi Posted 4 May 2008 , 12:11pm
post #5 of 36

<...Do you get paid regardless of how many students you have?...>
<...as long as you have one student, you get paid for the full amount...>

It depends on you, the store and the mgr.
I made a good amount by teaching day and night classes; keeping each class to a max of 10 students. If more then we split the class into 2 (more $$ icon_smile.gif

According to Wilton your pay should be based on how many people show up on the 1st night of any set of 4 classes. So if you start w/10 and by class 3 there are 6 you still get paid for the 10 who started. Still it depends on the store manager. I have had some mgrs say you must have a mim of 6 students in EACH weekly class and refused to pay me! icon_sad.gif

KeltoKel Posted 4 May 2008 , 12:53pm
post #6 of 36

Um yeah, it depends on the store. I am guessing you work for Michaels? They are one of the better stores to work for in my opinion.

I was offered a job from Joanne Fabrics and I turned it down. They hadn't run a course in months b/c they required 6 people and never got enough people. They couldn't keep instructors b/c of this. Their classroom was also super tiny and I wondered how they were even going to fit 6 people in their classroom.

The more people who sign up for classes, the more money you make. Well, I asked Joanne's how they would even fit 10 people in their class if I were to drum up interest and they couldn't answer that for me. I also asked them to move classes onto the store floor (and not in the back) and they weren't willing to do that. They only do that for their sewing classes!

So, ask many questions! Another reason why I didn't go with Joanne's was b/c they required weekend demos from time to time and you don't get paid for them. Well, forget that! Why would I work and not get paid? They said it was to get interest in the class, but Michael's pays their employees for weekend work so I just didn't agree with Joanne's when it came to that. Needless to say, I turned down the job.

Yes, Wilton offers seminars but the closest one to me was 3 hours away. With the cost of gas, the cost of a hotel, the seminar, etc. forget it. You won't make a ton with being an instructor (plus you have to buy your own supplies to buy when teaching - fondant, etc. ) that I just didn't think it was worth it.

Best of luck with whatever you decide.

KeltoKel Posted 4 May 2008 , 12:54pm
post #7 of 36

Um yeah, it depends on the store. I am guessing Cee Tee, you work for Michaels? They are one of the better stores to work for in my opinion.

I was offered a job from Joanne Fabrics and I turned it down. They hadn't run a course in months b/c they required 6 people and never got enough people. They couldn't keep instructors b/c of this. Their classroom was also super tiny and I wondered how they were even going to fit 6 people in their classroom.

The more people who sign up for classes, the more money you make. Well, I asked Joanne's how they would even fit 10 people in their class if I were to drum up interest and they couldn't answer that for me. I also asked them to move classes onto the store floor (and not in the back) and they weren't willing to do that. They only do that for their sewing classes!

So, ask many questions! Another reason why I didn't go with Joanne's was b/c they required weekend demos from time to time and you don't get paid for them. Well, forget that! Why would I work and not get paid? They said it was to get interest in the class, but Michael's pays their employees for weekend work so I just didn't agree with Joanne's when it came to that. Needless to say, I turned down the job.

Yes, Wilton offers seminars but the closest one to me was 3 hours away. With the cost of gas, the cost of a hotel, the seminar, etc. forget it. You won't make a ton with being an instructor (plus you have your own supplies to buy when teaching - fondant, etc. ) that I just didn't think it was worth it.

Best of luck with whatever you decide.

Tiababe Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:19pm
post #8 of 36

I'm not an instructor but I did take a class at Michaels. I got the feeling that my instructor could earn some extra cash if we purchased Wilton products. If we made a purchase, we showed the clerk our registration form and got 10% off. It has been over a year since I took the first class, and I wish I could remember what she said that made me draw the conclusion that she benefitted from our purchases. Anyway, just something to ask about if you interview for the job. Goodness knows, I made enough purchases during those four weeks to put some CHA-CHING in somebody else's pockets!!!!

mcassada Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:24pm
post #9 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiababe

I'm not an instructor but I did take a class at Michaels. I got the feeling that my instructor could earn some extra cash if we purchased Wilton products. If we made a purchase, we showed the clerk our registration form and got 10% off. It has been over a year since I took the first class, and I wish I could remember what she said that made me draw the conclusion that she benefitted from our purchases. Anyway, just something to ask about if you interview for the job. Goodness knows, I made enough purchases during those four weeks to put some CHA-CHING in somebody else's pockets!!!!




At JoAnns I do NOT make anything off what the students purchace
I don't know about Michaels

saberger Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:34pm
post #10 of 36

It does depend on the store, for sure. Michaels is MUCH better. AC Moore requires a minimum of 3 students and I only taught 2 classes there in the past year! Now I am at Michaels and it is better. They get products 1st, you actually get PAID for making your displays, for demos (got gift certificates at AC Moore), etc.

Tiababe - We don't get anything if students buy Wilton products (no commission or anything) - it benefits the store, not the instructor. -
Instructors get a discount through Wilton for products and the school. We get the training videos and if they offer a new course, then we would get trained for free. The pay scale is okay, depends on the # of students. Otherwise, it is just fun and a great way to get out of the house of you have kids (WHOO-HOO!!!) icon_smile.gif Hope that helps and answers some questions.

saberger Posted 4 May 2008 , 1:40pm
post #11 of 36

Keltokel, every store (or Wilton) pays for demos. AC Moore didn't pay for demos (esp. not like Michals does), but I got paid through Wilton. It is my understanding that some stores ask people to do them (or tell them) and some employees HAVE done it for free, but it is NOT required. Actually it is discouraged because when new instructors start at a store and the previous one did freebies, then it makes it hard for the new one to say no. Make sense?! So NEVER do them for free!!!

KeltoKel Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:10pm
post #12 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by saberger

Keltokel, every store (or Wilton) pays for demos. AC Moore didn't pay for demos (esp. not like Michals does), but I got paid through Wilton. It is my understanding that some stores ask people to do them (or tell them) and some employees HAVE done it for free, but it is NOT required. Actually it is discouraged because when new instructors start at a store and the previous one did freebies, then it makes it hard for the new one to say no. Make sense?! So NEVER do them for free!!!





Oh yes, it is coming back to me now. I would have been considered an independent contractor at Joanne's. I didn't have to do demos, but they were important in order to get people to take the classes. However, it mas made clear to me that I would not be paid for the demos since they were optional. It was a catch 22 in my opinion - do the demos on a Sat, and don't get paid, but hopefully get some students in your next classes.
This was last year that I was offered the job. Things may have changed a bit since them. But I know for sure I would not have been paid for Sat./demo work.

KeltoKel Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:17pm
post #13 of 36

I posted a similar topic last year when I was contemplating the job at Joanne's. You might want to check it out - many people said that Michael's in the best to work for.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-3884133-.html#3884133

Katied75 Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:21pm
post #14 of 36

Thanks everybody. I filled out an application. Of course, I'm only in Wilton course two, lol... so not really experienced enough yet. However they do need instructors in a couple of towns near me so I figured "what the heck". We'll see if anything comes of it.

Katie

CeeTee Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:30pm
post #15 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeltoKel

Um yeah, it depends on the store. I am guessing Cee Tee, you work for Michaels? They are one of the better stores to work for in my opinion.




Yep, I work for the Michael's where I took my classes at. I guess I am lucky. They let us run classes no matter how many sign up. They think its better to treat the customers well than herd them up to make more money.

As for promotion Wilton products in the class....well, to be frank, that's what the classes are all about. Wilton wants you to buy their stuff. It's business. I don't mind putting a bit of hard sell on their stuff cause I genuinely like their product. But I'm also honest about which are the good buys and which are not worth it ( the fondant!! *eek* )

Tho that's really odd about Joann's not paying you for demo time. When I used to teach at Joann's long long ago (I taught various kids projects and comic drawing then, not Wilton) I was paid for my time. They also gave me the supplies to make my demo board for the front of the store. Again, that may come down to the individual store. But either way, Wilton pays $40 for two hour demos independent, no matter which store you work for. At least that's what I understand.

tonedna Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:33pm
post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CeeTee

It doesn't pay enough to pay the bills, if that's what you're wondering. It's roughly $130-$150 ish per class depending on how many students you have. I dont have the pay chart on me so I cant give specifics.

You do get DVDs and training books. Wilton also has training seminars throughout the year you can attend.

So far I've really liked it! I only had one student for my Course I, but we had a lot of fun and it was a good start for me. I'm doing Course I again for May, and then will move on to doing cookie bouquet and candy making classes.




Do you mean per 4 class course..Cause I dont get paid this much per class! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif

CeeTee Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:42pm
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Do you mean per 4 class course..Cause I dont get paid this much per class! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif




Ack, yes I do mean that icon_redface.gif It was late when I made that post. I made sense in my mind! icon_razz.gif

tonedna Posted 4 May 2008 , 4:49pm
post #18 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by CeeTee

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

Do you mean per 4 class course..Cause I dont get paid this much per class! icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif



Ack, yes I do mean that icon_redface.gif It was late when I made that post. I made sense in my mind! icon_razz.gif





icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif I was about to move to your store!! icon_wink.gif

Katied75 Posted 4 May 2008 , 6:37pm
post #19 of 36

For those that are Wilton teachers, how much experience did you have before being hired? I'm wondering how much better I need to get before being considered to teach. Also, do they train you?

I am just starting the second Wilton class, btw, so I'm not ready to teach yet. I am interested in getting good enough to teach though. It seems like a fun way to indulge my hobby (and I'm a past high school teacher so it would combine my skills perfectly).

Katie

TexasSugar Posted 4 May 2008 , 7:57pm
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiababe

I'm not an instructor but I did take a class at Michaels. I got the feeling that my instructor could earn some extra cash if we purchased Wilton products. If we made a purchase, we showed the clerk our registration form and got 10% off....Goodness knows, I made enough purchases during those four weeks to put some CHA-CHING in somebody else's pockets!!!!




I've been teaching at Michaels for 4 years now, and I can promise you the WMI DO NOT MAKE ANYTHING on your purchases. When you purchase something the 'Cha-Ching" goes into Michaels Pockets, which is why they offer the classes.

tonedna Posted 4 May 2008 , 7:57pm
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katied75

For those that are Wilton teachers, how much experience did you have before being hired? I'm wondering how much better I need to get before being considered to teach. Also, do they train you?

I am just starting the second Wilton class, btw, so I'm not ready to teach yet. I am interested in getting good enough to teach though. It seems like a fun way to indulge my hobby (and I'm a past high school teacher so it would combine my skills perfectly).

Katie





To be honest I have a big problem when someone finishes Wilton and starts teaching a class next month.. I dont think for as good as a person is that the amount of classes is enough to be an expert on the subject and start teaching.. I was really good and I didnt think it was a good idea. My teacher tried pushing me to it and I refused.
A year later after gaining a lot of experience she ask me again and after some begging I said yes.
I see a lot students leave teachers cause they see the inexperience of those teacher. I have heard people complaining cause they didnt learn enough for that same reason.
I am not trying to hurt anyones feelings. But in all honesty 3 months of classes 2 hours a week is just not enough to be good.. You need experience and the desire to keep learning more and get a lot further so you can actually stand in front of a class and tell them how things are done without one single doubt that what you are saying is correct.
Those are my 2 cents!..
Edna

tonedna Posted 4 May 2008 , 8:02pm
post #22 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiababe

I'm not an instructor but I did take a class at Michaels. I got the feeling that my instructor could earn some extra cash if we purchased Wilton products. If we made a purchase, we showed the clerk our registration form and got 10% off. It has been over a year since I took the first class, and I wish I could remember what she said that made me draw the conclusion that she benefitted from our purchases. Anyway, just something to ask about if you interview for the job. Goodness knows, I made enough purchases during those four weeks to put some CHA-CHING in somebody else's pockets!!!!




Quite honestly I understand this and for as much I wish I got some CHA-CHING from it...No we dont.. I tell my students very honestly what is good and what is not worth to buy.. The problem with the cake decorating is that is not just about a cake and icing..Tools become very important.
Anf even after you stop the classes you will find out that tools will make decorating your cakes a lot more enjoyable..And they dont have to be Wilton!

Edna icon_biggrin.gif

TexasSugar Posted 4 May 2008 , 8:06pm
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katied75

For those that are Wilton teachers, how much experience did you have before being hired? I'm wondering how much better I need to get before being considered to teach. Also, do they train you?




I took Course 1 in 2001 and the other classes after that. I started teaching 4 years ago and was glad I had the experince of practice before I started teaching. Yes maybe there are some people that are complete naturals that can go straight into teaching, but I do think having some practice time can really help you help your students. Not only do you need to know how to do things right, you have to help people that are doing the wrong thing learn it right.

TexasSugar Posted 4 May 2008 , 8:40pm
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katied75

There may be a Wilton job opening up near me a few towns away. I'm only in course 2, but it will open up just as I'm finishing course 3. I'm not sure whether to apply or not. Do you get additional training on the Wilton way of teaching? How much are you paid?

Katie




My first question is do you want to teach the classes to share the art of cake decorating or are you doing it to make money? I always say that teaching the classes are a great part time job but wouldn't pay the rent every month.

Something to really factor in right now is the price of gas. I'm not sure how far the 'few towns' away are, but depending on how many times you teach a week that could really eat up your pay with just getting to and from the classes.

At Michaels you get paid $134 for a course, which is 4- 2 hour lessons. You get paid $33.50 a night for 2.5 to hour 3 hours. Not bad for a part time job. Plus after a certain number of students the pay goes up. 7-9 students will give you $144 for the course and then it goes up like $3 for each student after that. This is based on the first night of class.

At Michaels you are allowed to teach with only 1 to 2 students, but at other accounts you have to have atleast 4. If you teach 1 or 2 students you could get screwed, especially if you have to travel a distance to class because I have had students not show or call me. Which means I go to the store and wait for them to show up. If you teach just one or two students and no one shows for the class, you only get paid the hourly for what you were clocked in for and not the $33.50 for the class. And I can tell you of several times I have gone up there and waited for a student or got a message when I got ther that the student wasn't coming in. All my students have my number and email but there are some that will not call you.

At Michaels you are also required to do demo's every other month. This are Saturday afternoon, the date and time picked out for you. You get paid $39 for these.

The reason I say it is not a job to pay the bills because you do not know until the first week of the month how much you are making that month. One month you may have 1 or 2 courses running while the next month 3 to 4. This also depends on where you teach and how often the classroom is available.

Everything you see your instructor carry is hers, and I'd say atleast 95% of it she has bought. Wilton does give us freebys now and then, but most of the stuff I carry to class are things I bought. You also have to bake a cake for Course 1 and make icing in it. In Course 2 you make Royal icing and in C3 and F/GP there is the fondant as well as other things. For the demo's you do cupcakes/cake/cookies and icing. Again this comes out of your pocket. Wilton did give us a $14 pay increase this year to help cover those things, but it is still things you have to buy.

Now depending on what store you work out you could get a employee discount. At Michaels it is 25% which makes it a little easier to buy the things you use in class alot. And if you order directly from Wilton you get 40% off what you buy, but you do have to figure in shipping and handling. Wilton does give you ways to earn gift certificates to use when you order from them as well.

As far as training, Wilton sends you DVD's to watch that go through teaching the classes. They also do Training sessions. These are 3 day training meetings that are done in the fall and winter. You go through teaching the Course 2, 3 and the FG/P in these three days. You pay for your hotel for 3 days and your travel to get there and I think like $35 to attend. You do get each of the Course Kits and a few other nice things when you attend. I haven't been to a training meeting yet, other than the Course 1 Day thing they did last year. They always fall at the wrong time of year for me where I don't have the money to go, or there is something else I have to do that weekend.

They also do a meeting in the summer. These are more of a business meeting than a trainging meeting. Yes we do learn something new or something to help us teach the classes better, but it is nothing like the 3 day training meetings. These cost like $25 plus travel and hotel stay (if you have to.) At these meetings we get to see alot of the new products and even get to go home with a few.

I love teaching the Wilton classes, so don't get me wrong. I just want you to be aware of everything involved and not just what the pay is. It is a great part time job. There is not may jobs you can go make $10+ an hour for doing something you love and not having to go to school for it. But because it is all based on having a course make and how many students you have it is really hard to count on that money to pay a bill. Yes you could pay a bill one month, but the next month you may not be able to.

Hope these helps. I'm not trying to scare you away from it, just want you to have all the information to think about.

Katied75 Posted 4 May 2008 , 8:52pm
post #25 of 36

Thanks everybody.

I am a student right now, so I'm not ready to be a Wilton instructor. I did fill out an application though and hopefully they'll respond and give me information on how skilled I should be to be a Witon instructor.

I am a former high school teacher, and teaching is in my blood. I love cake decorating now that I'm getting into it, but I've found it to be an expensive hobby.

My thought was that since I'm currently a stay at home mom and will be for at least 3 more years since my kids are so young, this might be a good way for me to combine my love of teaching and cake decorating, and earn enough money to pay for some of the cake tools I want (right now I want a kitchenaid mixer, lol).

I'm not looking to get rich, and like I said... it could be 6 months or a year before I feel I know enough to teach. I just thought this might be a good way to eventually pay for all of the stuff I am buying right now.

Katie

DoniB Posted 4 May 2008 , 8:58pm
post #26 of 36

Thanks for all the info, Texas Sugar. Lots to think about! icon_smile.gif

TexasSugar Posted 4 May 2008 , 9:13pm
post #27 of 36

When I was first asked by the WMI before me about taking her place I freaked out. I questioned if I was good enough to do it and all that. After I got over that I questioned why she was leaving. I wanted to know if it was something to do with the store or what not. I also found a WMI on a message board I was on and picked her brain about it. I wanted all the information I could get. I trusted the WMI that I was going to be replacing, but wanted an outside view of someone else too.

I think knowing all the nitty gritty helps you decide if it is for you, and it is better to go into it with all the information than to get surprised along the way.

This month marks my 4 years of doing it. When I have students leave after completely the courses or ones that have to take a break in the middle I always tell them to come back and see me because I will be there as long as the store lets me. icon_smile.gif I really enjoy teaching the classes and watching applying what they learn and know I helped them do that.

DoniB Posted 4 May 2008 , 10:14pm
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

icon_smile.gif I really enjoy teaching the classes and watching applying what they learn and know I helped them do that.




See? That's what it's all about, isn't it? If you don't love what you're teaching, your students know it. I haven't taught cake decorating (yet... working on that!), but I've taught a number of other crafts, and I love the 'Aha!' moments, when people just suddenly 'get' what you're trying to teach them. The smiles on their faces when they realize they really CAN do this, are just amazing to me. That's worth the drive to get wherever I go to teach. icon_smile.gif

If I'm accepted as a teacher and matched with a place that needs one, I think I want to save up to go take the Master Course at Wilton! That'll be the goal...

shadowgypsie Posted 4 May 2008 , 10:54pm
post #29 of 36

Just thought I'd add some info on teaching Wilton Classes. If you are picked to teach at a Hobby Lobby they do not pay for displays or demo's and you are considered an independant contractor by them.

CeeTee Posted 4 May 2008 , 11:42pm
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

To be honest I have a big problem when someone finishes Wilton and starts teaching a class next month..
(...)
I am not trying to hurt anyones feelings. But in all honesty 3 months of classes 2 hours a week is just not enough to be good.. You need experience and the desire to keep learning more and get a lot further so you can actually stand in front of a class and tell them how things are done without one single doubt that what you are saying is correct.
Those are my 2 cents!..
Edna




That's exactly why I waited a year before accepting a WMI position at my store. My instructor was encouraging me to sign up as one before I was done with Course II, but I wasn't ready yet. I'd done craft teaching before, so I know it's a lot of work, but I wasn't familiar enough with cake decorating still to feel qualified to teach it. After winning first place Amatuer at the AZ Cake Arts show this year, I felt I'd finally come far enough, especially since until that point I was still convincing myself I was a total noob icon_razz.gif

It's so not about the money for me. I just like having a chance to go play with icing for two hours with others who want to have fun with sugar as well! icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif It's the best stress relief one could ask for! (especially considering my day job *LOL*)

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