Do You Think Fondant Is Over Used?

Decorating By elfgirl1968 Updated 8 Jul 2013 , 3:10pm by slapsappyhappy

elfgirl1968 Posted 8 May 2008 , 2:10am
post #61 of 87

I think my biggest pet peeve with fondant when it is used to the hilt is that it looks "so fake". It doesn't look natural. It can come across, in my opinion, as garish and gaudy when it is "overused" on one cake.

Kerry Vincent's cakes, to me, look like they should be in a museum, not at a special occasion.

Colette goes over the top also. Yet, they are quite eye popping!

Yes, there is great creativity in fondant, I agree with everyone on that. But lets not forget that before fondant EVERYTHING was done with buttercream! Fondant is, in my opinion, an easy way to a quick fix of gorgeous.

Maybe I'm just too much of a traditionalist, but I just wish buttercream would get the recognition it deserves. Which is, it takes mega, mega skill and patience to work with buttercream. Buttercream is to Michaelangelo or Boccaccio, as fondant is to Picasso or Chagall.

indydebi Posted 8 May 2008 , 2:11am
post #62 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminiRJ

When was the last time the decorators had to serve a sample of their cake to the "clients" and gave them a slice that was covered in fondant? Never. Even my kids found it interesting that all the cakes were fondant, but not a single sample used it.




I never noticed that! Now I"m gonna be watching for it! Thanks!! icon_biggrin.gif

DDiva Posted 8 May 2008 , 2:40am
post #63 of 87

Like trends in other areas of our life, it's fondants day now. I LOVE working with fondant!! It allows for an artistic expression that simply can not be duplicated using any other medium.

If decorated cakes is your business, these cakes are the money makers. I thank Food Network, the Cake Challenges, and Ace of Cakes daily!! They allow people to see what is possible. And people will pay extra for an extra special cake. And when done well, including the taste, you will have repeat business and new business as a result.

I teach cake decorating and strongly urge my students to learn as many techniques as possible....especially if they're in business. The more you know, the more options that you can offer your customers.

I use FondX, Satin Ice and Chocopan. I've tested every brand available in the US. These are my favorites.

No, I don't think it is overused. I think it is finally getting a fair break. I also think that some (some) of the naysayers aren't comfortable working with it and therefore don't like it.

Like anything else, practice, practice, practice. It's great to work with, the brands I mentioned taste great (all can be flavored), and are reasonably priced. I DO NOT charge extra for fondant...because I prefer using it.

Wendl Posted 8 May 2008 , 2:45am
post #64 of 87

I say to each his/her own. I prefer fondant, even though I really didn't know it existed until a few years back. I am not going to bust up on someone who does awesome buttercream just because I am more fondant-friendly. I respect that talent. But I like the sculpting and painting I can do on fondant, it suits my artistic training best. Plus, it travels better where I am at. If the box lid brushes against it...it doesn't make a mark - whereas on a buttercream cake - it's 'get out the repair kit'. And, since I have started using non-Wilton fondant, I have had no drive to really do any other type of cake. My friends and family love them.
Which reminds me, time to knock out some 50/50 items for the cake on Saturday!
icon_smile.gif
Enjoy the sugar arts, whatever suits your pleasure and your palate! icon_smile.gif If you don't like fondant or buttercream, don't use them. It's easy, really. Just don't look down your nose at someone that enjoys it.
Peace, Wendl
(personally, what I am sick of is Topsy-turvy and purse cakes! And the sculpted baby and pregnant belly cakes creep me the heck out! Putting a knife in them is just not right in my book - it's like you are summoning a c-section or a surgery for the baby - but that's me - I just won't do one.)

BCJean Posted 8 May 2008 , 3:05am
post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendl


(personally, what I am sick of is Topsy-turvy and purse cakes! And the sculpted baby and pregnant belly cakes creep me the heck out! Putting a knife in them is just not right in my book - it's like you are summoning a c-section or a surgery for the baby - but that's me - I just won't do one.)




I guess that would be a real plus for using fondant. After they remove all of the fondant to serve it, it no longer looks like whatever the original cake was.

xstitcher Posted 8 May 2008 , 3:40am
post #66 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendl

And, since I have started using non-Wilton fondant, I have had no drive to really do any other type of cake. My friends and family love them.

(And the sculpted baby and pregnant belly cakes creep me the heck out! Putting a knife in them is just not right in my book - it's like you are summoning a c-section or a surgery for the baby - but that's me - )




Hey Wendl,

It's not just you, I've had the same thought too. I think it's neat how well people can get them to look so life like, but at the same time because they look so life like it would kinda freak me out if I had to cut the cake!

P.S. What kind of fondant are you using now?

Take care!

icon_biggrin.gif

kansaswolf Posted 8 May 2008 , 4:08am
post #67 of 87

It's not overused in my neck of the woods, because NO ONE uses it... Probably because they can only find Wilton... Ick.

I make my own fondant with cream cheese, which is SO TASTY, I don't have any trouble selling my cakes with fondant! I just have to get people to realize what it is, because (again) NO ONE else uses fondant much here.

loriana Posted 8 May 2008 , 3:33pm
post #68 of 87

Here is an inspiring image of amazing buttercream cake. I think this picture below is from a competition in Russia. I would love to meet these folks! I am going to start another thread with all of these pictures which are amazing, about 75% are fondant but many have incredible buttercream detail.

Also, here is a link to Jacques Pastries. I am pretty sure he uses IMBC or SWBC, but he is quite an artist with buttercream too:

http://www.jacquespastries.com/
LL

Wendl Posted 8 May 2008 , 7:16pm
post #69 of 87

Pam (and anyone else),
I use Satin Ice primarily (tho' someday, I dream of using Fondx) and love it. I have some packets of Pettinice that I haven't been disappointed with.
As I have said in another thread, I haven't dared to try to make my own...I have enough things going on in my apartment kitchen. I take the 'order' way out. icon_wink.gif Which reminds me, I have a ton of crumbcoat buttercream to make...as well as the rest of the cakes to bake...the water was off at my apt building yesterday evening!??!?! I was not cracking an egg if I couldn't wash hands/surface right away! Nothing like being a couple of evenings behind! Pressure, hey, it got me through my Fine Arts degree! icon_wink.gif
Peace love and almond filling!
Wendl

xstitcher Posted 9 May 2008 , 4:55am
post #70 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendl



Hi Wendl, thanks for responding! I've looked on-line and so far haven't seen any websites that sell Satin Ice in Canada (I'll keep trying & hopefully I'll find someone who does soon icon_biggrin.gif )!

P.S. I hope your water is turned on again!

Thanks!!



Wendl


icon_biggrin.gif

elfgirl1968 Posted 9 May 2008 , 8:21am
post #71 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by loriana

Here is an inspiring image of amazing buttercream cake. I think this picture below is from a competition in Russia. I would love to meet these folks! I am going to start another thread with all of these pictures which are amazing, about 75% are fondant but many have incredible buttercream detail.

Also, here is a link to Jacques Pastries. I am pretty sure he uses IMBC or SWBC, but he is quite an artist with buttercream too:

http://www.jacquespastries.com/




Wow! I love these cakes. These will give me great inspiration. I just ordered the Cakegenie lessons, so I'm very excited to "learn, learn, learn" some new stuff for my loyal customers.

Curtsmin24 Posted 9 May 2008 , 9:05am
post #72 of 87

I like them both equally but I do understand where you are coming from. I just ordered a 1954 wilton book because I have been dying to figure out how to make buttercream calla lillies and everyone I ask doesn't know how!!! I was told it couldn't be done icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Well I found a way icon_twisted.gif In the book I also noticed that there were flowers that I have yet seen on cakes done in buttercream. I miss those pulled sugar flowers. Roses weren't the only thing you could make but I guess over the years they became more popular and people forgot about the other beaties and as time passed they wanted the 3-d look of fondant. I know times change and it is what's "in" but I am trying to learn as much as possible so that I can combine a little bit of this and that. I don't mind the hard work involved in anything pastry or cake. It's the final product that makes me happy and the look on my customers faces that matter the most. ( except those darn PITA's ) I don't know but I miss the yummy ribbon candy. mmmm. I am so old school and I am not even that old. I tell hubby I had to have been reincarnated or something because I love my nanas oldies and I love the vintage stuff. It had more quality and sure lasts a lot longer than half the crap they make now icon_redface.gif

fontastic Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 6:43pm
post #73 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtsmin24 

I like them both equally but I do understand where you are coming from. I just ordered a 1954 wilton book because I have been dying to figure out how to make buttercream calla lillies and everyone I ask doesn't know how!!! I was told it couldn't be done icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Well I found a way icon_twisted.gif In the book I also noticed that there were flowers that I have yet seen on cakes done in buttercream. I miss those pulled sugar flowers. Roses weren't the only thing you could make but I guess over the years they became more popular and people forgot about the other beaties and as time passed they wanted the 3-d look of fondant. I know times change and it is what's "in" but I am trying to learn as much as possible so that I can combine a little bit of this and that. I don't mind the hard work involved in anything pastry or cake. It's the final product that makes me happy and the look on my customers faces that matter the most. ( except those darn PITA's ) I don't know but I miss the yummy ribbon candy. mmmm. I am so old school and I am not even that old. I tell hubby I had to have been reincarnated or something because I love my nanas oldies and I love the vintage stuff. It had more quality and sure lasts a lot longer than half the crap they make now icon_redface.gif

Which book were you able to find the buttercream calla lillies?

BakingIrene Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 7:18pm
post #74 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by fontastic 

Which book were you able to find the buttercream calla lillies?

There are several books that show the same information.

 

You start with "flower buttercream" made from white shortening and powdered sugar and corn syrup.  You add more sugar to stiffen (this makes it the same recipe as "rolled buttercream").  You colour some of this dough yellow, roll strips, and dip them into yellow sugar for the centres.  Then you make the flower petal from the white dough. This flower needs to be put onto layers of paper towel to air dry.

 

One source is Richard Snyder "65 Buttercream Flowers" long out of print but available used and in some big city libraries.

bostonterrierlady Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 10:00pm
post #75 of 87

YES!!!  I always frost my cakes in buttercream.  Love piping too.  I do like fondant accents though.

remnant3333 Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 10:58pm
post #76 of 87

I guess it is a matter of preference. I prefer buttercream.  You can make just about any kind of border or flowers with buttercream.  Here is one below that does cala lillies.  I love all of her videos on how to make flowers with buttercream. I have nothing against fondant because I have seen beautiful cakes with fondant.  I have never tasted fondant but people that I know who have say they always take it off their slice of cake and never eat it because they do not like it. I guess that is why I never tried it yet.

 

http://seriouscakes.com/wordpress/?page_id=399

AZCouture Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 11:09pm
post #77 of 87

I would LOVE to do more buttercream only designs. Problem is, I find that most people want cakes that require fondant, and I am not one of those people who want to knock themselves out making it "almost the same" with buttercream. I use SMBC, so can't/won't color it darker than pastel shades, so that really limits what I do.

 

I do love getting all bc requests though.

tdovewings Posted 26 Dec 2012 , 11:24pm
post #78 of 87

I love both or different reasons. However, I do have a peeve with cupcakes decorated in all fondant. A cupcake just screams frosting/buttercream unless it is just a show piece.

cazza1 Posted 27 Dec 2012 , 2:30am
post #79 of 87

Buttercream for decorating has always been an American thing in my mind and the thought of eating buttercream made with shortening of any sorts puts me off.  I do use buttercream on cupcakes and in layers but I make it with all butter.  We have always used fondant for special cakes in Australia and that is what most people expect.  Virtually everyone I know loves it and eats it but even though I am a sweet tooth I peel it off and throw it in the bin.

Chellescakes Posted 27 Dec 2012 , 2:55am
post #80 of 87

different strokes for different strokes, I don't do buttercream , if I have clients insist that they don't want fondant and want buttercream , I just say I am sorry I am not your decorator.   Usually it is young couples that have been on American sites or reading American magazines, as it is just not really all that common here in Oz , we tend to associate buttercream with "homemade" or yucky supermarket cakes. 

StaceFaceCakes Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 6:56am
post #81 of 87

AI love the taste of Satin Ice Vanilla fondant.

planetsomsom Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 7:13pm
post #82 of 87

I think it's kinda weird that fondant has the reputation of looking good but tasting bad.

 

Why not just use fondant that tastes good??? And put a nice, slightly-salty italian meringue under it for balance?

 

Though making marshmallow fondant is a lot of work, ugh. Sometimes I just crave that awful bucket buttercream slathered on a cake and crusted overnight in the fridge. Good times.

slapsappyhappy Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 7:58pm
post #83 of 87

Is there any place/book that I could read the history of cake decorating (similar to history of fashion, like each decade has a certain style)? I have googled many things, but there is nothing really good that explains when fondant became popular, etc. I know that Wilton, Lambeth, and Australian style cake decorating all were popular at some point, but I wish there was something that would explain the history of cake decorating because it is so interesting. Do different trends go in and out of style like fashion does?
 

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 8:09pm
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by planetsomsom 

I think it's kinda weird that fondant has the reputation of looking good but tasting bad...

 

i haven't tried wilton fondant in some time but it used to stink so bad--omg--you'd never eat it

 

one of those gums in there went south big time so the reputation was warranted in some cases

 

then trying to get america to get over the no-melt-in-your mouth thing at the same time

 

din go over too good huh

slapsappyhappy Posted 8 Jul 2013 , 12:22pm
post #85 of 87

AI am curious about the history of fondant, like where/when it originated, when it first started being popular to use etc. I googled it several times but there is not much at all! I am really curious because I have vintage Wilton yearbooks and they don't have any fondant cakes, then in the 90s-2000 yearbooks it started to be mostly fondant. Idk if that is a US thing or international. Just curious... Anyone have more info?

cakefat Posted 8 Jul 2013 , 1:38pm
post #86 of 87

http://rosesen.wordpress.com/2010/07/19/the-history-of-rolled-fondant/

 

http://cakecentral.com/t/25360/fondant-history

 

 

http://www.ehow.com/info_8716669_history-fondant-cakes.html

slapsappyhappy Posted 8 Jul 2013 , 3:10pm
post #87 of 87

AThank you, I have to get that Toba Garrett book because it sounds like it has the details I am looking for. All of the sites basically say the same thing, that it was used since the medieval times to decorate cakes and that it became popular in the US just recently. If they have been using it for so long why is it just now becoming popular in the US? And why do most of the commercial ones taste terrible? It just seems strange that it pretty much disappeared from the cake scene in the US for such a long time because before women started working outside of the home they had more time to bake and would have been able to make amazing fondant cakes!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%