KTsmom1 Posted 30 Apr 2008 , 4:39pm
post #1 of

I have a customer that has requested "old fashioned white wedding cake". She said she doesn't want filling or that "fluffy" white cake that everyone is so fond of.

Any recipe ideas?

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

24 replies
KHalstead Posted 30 Apr 2008 , 5:37pm
post #2 of

I'll bet she's looking for the good ol' standard white pound cake! Nice and dense and delicious!!

JanH Posted 1 May 2008 , 6:21am
post #3 of

Sounds like she's asking for a scratch white cake.

Here's an old Southern white cake recipe:

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2371-White-Trillium-Cake.html

If she wants pound cake, I like Elvis Presley's favorite; but it's not white:

http://www.recipezaar.com/36806

When she says she doesn't want filling, I'm assuming she wants frosting between the layers.

HTH

KTsmom1 Posted 1 May 2008 , 3:14pm
post #4 of

Thank you both! icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 1 May 2008 , 10:31pm
post #5 of

I dont' know how you guys deal with folks like this. icon_eek.gif

I probably would have leaned back and asked her "just what IS 'old fashioned' wedding cake?" and made her define it.

KTsmom1 Posted 1 May 2008 , 11:38pm
post #6 of

LOL! I did, and that's what I got. I'm going to give it my best shot. Hopefully she'll like it and come back. If not, apparently I won't be the first one who couldn't give her the "old fashioned wedding cake" that she is looking for. From what I understand...I'm the sixth try.

NO PRESSURE!!! icon_smile.gif

vteventrider Posted 1 May 2008 , 11:51pm
post #7 of

A good scratch dense white cake that is sort of what she may want is the white butter cake from the Cake Bible. That is what I think of when I think of old fashioned wedding cake.

topaz176 Posted 2 May 2008 , 12:02am
post #8 of

No filling means, nothing inside.
Just plain butter cake. (pound cake)

indydebi Posted 2 May 2008 , 12:20am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by vteventrider

.....when I think of old fashioned wedding cake.



I think my hang up is when people use the term "old fashioned". For anything. What exactly does that mean? icon_eek.gif

When my son was born, all the new mommies were going thru the 'fad' of "We're going to pick an old-fashioned name!" Well, if everyone TODAY is using the name, doesnt' that make it the modern name? (So among all the Jerimiah's and Zachariah's being born then, I named my son "john". Plain John" Good ole, regular all american "john"! icon_biggrin.gif )

I've seen threads where buttercream as been defined as the "old fashioned way" to decorate a cake. Been doing BC-only for 25 years .... I'll probably do it for another 25. (Pry that decorating bag out of my cold dead hands!) So..... What's the "old fashioned" part? It's still being done today! icon_confused.gif

Likewise when I get brides who claim "we're non-traditional!" I lean back and ask them: You wearing a pretty white dress? You wearing a tux? Church? Music? Friends standing up with you all dressed alike? Dad giving you away? Big party afterwards? Gifts? Now that's a tradition I KNOW you're into! So ... what part of you is non-traditional again? icon_confused.gif

Just an observation...... icon_wink.gif

vteventrider Posted 2 May 2008 , 12:27am

Good point indydebi. Also what makes something old fashioned and not just classical and traditional? I should have said that is what I think of when I think of traditional wedding cake, and yes I did have it at my wedding 10 years ago, but I freely admit to being traditional.

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 2 May 2008 , 12:52am

If you're doing a tasting for her (it sounds like you are) I'd do that 'old fashioned butter pound cake' that was mentioned previously with a good 'old fashioned' seven minute frosting. JMHO. Good luck and let us know what happens.

JanH Posted 2 May 2008 , 1:45am
Quote:
Originally Posted by topaz176

No filling means, nothing inside.
Just plain butter cake. (pound cake)





I think the customer probably means no fancy-schmancy filling. icon_lol.gif

If no filling is requested, b/c is the "default" filling. icon_smile.gif

(Have to use something to glue the two cake layers together when making a layer cake.) thumbs_up.gif

indydebi Posted 2 May 2008 , 2:06am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

(Have to use something to glue the two cake layers together when making a layer cake.) thumbs_up.gif




Had a bride last week who asked for "no filling" and I told her the same thing ... you really need a filling to hold the two cakes together. But I did say I'd use a really thin layer of filling! thumbs_up.gif

JanH Posted 2 May 2008 , 2:57am
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Had a bride last week who asked for "no filling" and I told her the same thing ... you really need a filling to hold the two cakes together. But I did say I'd use a really thin layer of filling! thumbs_up.gif




I can understand the bride (& groom) declining filling for themselves. icon_rolleyes.gif

But declining filling for ALL the guests, too. icon_confused.gif

I like b/c, and I really like really good b/c. icon_biggrin.gif

(If I was a guest at their wedding, I'd be like, "where's the filling"?) icon_lol.gif

If you don't like b/c, you can always scrape it off, but if it's not there..... icon_sad.gif

CakesbyMonica Posted 2 May 2008 , 3:14am

Reminds me of those Hostess commercials, "Where's the cream filling?!"

YummyFireMummy Posted 2 May 2008 , 3:23am

Don't any of you come over here to Australia lol...don't get many cakes at all with filling over here!!

lorijom Posted 2 May 2008 , 3:29am

I just flipped thru 3 of my books from the 1950's, 2 Australian 1 Wilton, and all of them call for wedding cakes to be made of light or dark fruit cake. So I don't think the bride wants "old fashioned"...I doubt she knows what she wants icon_rolleyes.gif

dragonflydreams Posted 2 May 2008 , 3:32am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijom

I just flipped thru 3 of my books from the 1950's, 2 Australian 1 Wilton, and all of them call for wedding cakes to be made of light or dark fruit cake. So I don't think the bride wants "old fashioned"...I doubt she knows what she wants icon_rolleyes.gif


Yup . . . fruit cake is what I think of when you say "old fashioned wedding cake" . . . guess that reeeeaaaalllly dates me, eh??? icon_confused.gif

lorijom Posted 2 May 2008 , 3:40am
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonflydreams

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijom

I just flipped thru 3 of my books from the 1950's, 2 Australian 1 Wilton, and all of them call for wedding cakes to be made of light or dark fruit cake. So I don't think the bride wants "old fashioned"...I doubt she knows what she wants icon_rolleyes.gif

Yup . . . fruit cake is what I think of when you say "old fashioned wedding cake" . . . guess that reeeeaaaalllly dates me, eh??? icon_confused.gif




Dragonfly, we're not dated we just have plenty years of experience and wisdom icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

JanH Posted 2 May 2008 , 4:01am

While researching something else....

Wedding cakes served in America from Colonial times to the mid-19th century were thick, rich spice cakes that included alcohol, dried fruit and nuts. They were more like Christmas fruitcakes than the light, fluffy cakes we now associate with wedding cakes.

The multi-tiered white on white cake Americans now eat are Victorian customs.

HTH

dragonflydreams Posted 2 May 2008 , 4:33am
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Wedding cakes served in America from Colonial times to the mid-19th century were thick, rich spice cakes that included alcohol, dried fruit and nuts. They were more like Christmas fruitcakes than the light, fluffy cakes we now associate with wedding cakes.




. . . EXACTLY . . . Grand Marnier was a nice choice for the alcohol . . . icon_biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by lorijomh

Dragonfly, we're not dated we just have plenty years of experience and wisdom icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




. . . nicely put . . . I'll have to remember that . . . experience and wisdom icon_cool.gif

KTsmom1 Posted 2 May 2008 , 4:42am

I bow to all of the experience and wisdom! icon_smile.gif

Thanks to everyone for the wealth of knowledge shared! I had no idea I would get such a wonderful response on my first question that I posed in the forum. I guess I know where to go for any future cake dilemas. icon_biggrin.gif

Sugar_Plum_Fairy Posted 2 May 2008 , 6:09am

Hey, if she doesn't want BC to 'glue' the layers together, tell her you could use something else that would cost a lot less - Elmer's! lol

Sorry, I just couldn't resist this. Takes a lot of patience to deal with so many different people.

topaz176 Posted 2 May 2008 , 1:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by YummyFireMummy

Don't any of you come over here to Australia lol...don't get many cakes at all with filling over here!!








Here in the Caribbean, we do not have all that filling for wedding cakes.
It's common. Because of the hot weather here I would not do it eighter.
I have done one in December with NO filling. 3 inches high yellow cake with buttercream icing.
Maybe she's looking at something like this.
Just an idea!
LL

topaz176 Posted 2 May 2008 , 1:16pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

While researching something else....

Wedding cakes served in America from Colonial times to the mid-19th century were thick, rich spice cakes that included alcohol, dried fruit and nuts. They were more like Christmas fruitcakes than the light, fluffy cakes we now associate with wedding cakes.

The multi-tiered white on white cake Americans now eat are Victorian customs.

HTH





We have the multi-tiered cake and the caribbean black cake(full of rum) thumbs_up.gif .The black cake goes in the cake box for the guest to take away.

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